Current weather

  • Clear sky
  • 64°
    Clear sky
Home > Feed aggregator
  • Syndicate content

Board member takes issue with Sullivan endorsement

AP Alaska News - Wed, 07/09/2014 - 5:11pm
Board member takes issue with Sullivan endorsement Associated Press - 10 July 2014 01:11-04:00 News Topics: General news, Government and politics, Senate elections, Elections, Political endorsements, State legislature, Legislature, State governments People, Places and Companies: Mark Begich, Joe Miller, Alaska, United States Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Sterling says he won't sell team, calls wife pig

AP Sports News - Wed, 07/09/2014 - 5:10pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Donald Sterling denounced his wife, her lawyers and the NBA from the witness stand Wednesday, saying he would never sell the Los Angeles Clippers and vowing a lifetime of lawsuits against the league. 2014-07-09T21:11:27-04:00 2014-07-09T21:07:24-04:00

Column: Now sober, De La Hoya still keeps fighting

AP Sports News - Wed, 07/09/2014 - 5:10pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — The day after winning the only gold medal for the U.S. boxing team in the 1992 Olympics, Oscar De La Hoya was pulled out of bed to sit next to swimmer Janet Evans and talk about the success of American athletes in Barcelona. 2014-07-09T21:11:27-04:00 2014-07-09T17:06:39-04:00

AP Source: Cavs agree to multiplayer, 3-team trade

AP Sports News - Wed, 07/09/2014 - 5:10pm
CLEVELAND (AP) — The Cleveland Cavaliers have cleared a path for LeBron James to come back home. 2014-07-09T21:11:27-04:00 2014-07-09T19:39:34-04:00

Police detectives, meth king vie for Emmy nods

AP Entertainment News - Wed, 07/09/2014 - 5:02pm
Police detectives, meth king vie for Emmy nods Associated Press - 10 July 2014 01:02-04:00 News Topics: Arts and entertainment, General news, Television programs, Entertainment, Celebrity, Emmy Awards, Sitcoms, TV dramas, Television awards, Award shows, Events People, Places and Companies: Matthew McConaughey, Woody Harrelson, Bryan Cranston, Taylor Schilling, Seth Meyers Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Science Friday: Robot Garage

Juneau Public Library Blog - Wed, 07/09/2014 - 3:45pm
Friday, July 11th 1-3:30 at the Valley Library The Summer Reading Program this year includes, among other things, Science FRidays, with exciting new themes each week. This Friday, July 11, the theme is “Robot Garage”: kids will use robotic kits to explore the basic engineering required to build a successful terrestrial rover. Students will also […]
Categories: Arts & Culture

From the archives: 49 Writers Interview with Melinda Moustakis

49 Writers - Wed, 07/09/2014 - 7:00am

In 2010, Deb interviewed Flannery O'Connor Short Fiction Award Melinda Moustakis. At the time, she was living in Kalamazoo, MI, but she writes about Alaska, where she lived as a child and where she retains strong ties.   Her collection Bear Down, Bear North, for which she won the Flannery O'Connor award, features stories set in Alaska, one of which appeared in the 2009 Spring/Summer issue of Alaska Quarterly Review , and another in the Spring 2011 AQR. 

Melinda will be reading at the UAA Bookstore in Anchorage on Monday, July 14 from 4 - 6 pm.

Imagery associated with rivers and fish runs through your stories. What makes these images important to you?

About six years ago, I started going up to Alaska in the summers to go fishing with my uncle and stay at his cabin on the Kenai River. He knows that river inside and out and I am extremely lucky that he takes me fishing and is an expert fisherman. I don’t know if there’s anything better than when you’re on a drift, dragging for rainbows, there’s no wind, the midnight sun is setting, and all you hear is the flick of a fly rod as you mend your line. I also don’t know anybody who tells a better hunting or fishing story than my uncle. I think this all explains my love of fishing and my love for fishing stories and fishing banter.

In many of your stories, sinister family relationships create tension that’s a lot like a fish running a line under the water – you never know when it will surface. In terms of crafting a story, how does this tension evolve?

I think my writing really came together when I started to marry the idea of fishing or hunting with family relationships. What I mean is, the structure of a fishing story became the vessel that allowed me to write about relationships. If you think about it, when you’re fishing, you have some idea that a fish could bite at any moment, you anticipate it, but, you have no idea exactly what will happen. The fish might bite. You might get skunked and never have a bite. You might hook into a little dolly and throw it back. You might be fishing for rainbows and hook into a monster king and have a story you’ll tell for the rest of your life. In my story, “The Weight of You,” there’s a similar tension built around what the character Gracie wants to tell her brother, Jack, while they are fishing for kings. You know she has something to tell him something. Will she tell him? Won’t she? Why doesn’t she want to tell him? How life-changing is this thing that she has to tell him? Is she making it out to be a bigger deal than it is? Fishing and fishing stories taught me how to structure tension and anticipation.

Alice McDermott advises writers to do what they can get away with. In your stories, you make effective use of second person (“The Weight of You”) and vignettes (“The Mannequin in Soldotna). To what extent do you advise emerging writers to push the conventions of story?

I taught myself how to think about and write different points of view and structures in this collection by pushing convention. You have to take risks in order to learn. My advice is to write the story in the way it has to be told, whatever that happens to be. Even if the story is a failure, you have learned something that will make you a better writer. I started many of these stories over again because the voice or the point of view or structure wasn’t working or clicking in. Then I would try a different point of view like second person or first person plural and suddenly, the story sailed. But there are definite reasons why these stories are in these varying points of view or structures. And all these things are working together to create compelling characters. For me, structure has to inform meaning and vice versa. When that happens, there’s magic. When that happens, a reader comes away from a story with their heart exploding and their brain buzzing. That’s what my aim is because that’s what I feel when I read something wonderful. I know I have fallen for a story when I have to shake it off and swim back to shore, so to speak. Or rather, I feel as if the universe has tilted. I don’t think you can achieve any of these things without taking risks in some way.

Clearly Alaska is important in your work. What keeps drawing you back?

I was born in Fairbanks and grew up in California, and both my parents grew up in Anchorage and my maternal grandparents homesteaded in Alaska. So all my family stories, the ones that were told over and over again, the ones that became part of the family mythology, were set in Alaska. It’s not that I keep getting drawn back, it’s more that I can’t escape it. And I am my best writer self when I write about Alaska. I have tried to write about other things, but they are never as good.

Part of what makes your work so compelling is an intimate tone that suggests you know what you write. To what extent is your fiction grounded in your own life experiences?

I have been fishing quite a bit so I can place the reader on the river. But more than that, my fishing expert uncle has shared his knowledge with me. I know the fishing jargon from listening to my uncle and his buddies and then from learning to tell my own fishing stories. The starting ideas for many of my stories are often inspired from my own life experiences or stories that I have heard or have been passed down to me. Then the process of writing turns that inspirational kernel into this whole new other thing. I write fiction because I like the freedom of changing what needs to be altered in order to make the story better -- like how every time you tell that story about that monster fish you caught, the fish gains a few pounds and inches. The story stretches. The fish stretches. I like to write in that slinky accordion of a space. Also, I know I often write to work through things I don’t quite understand and I think that gives my work a sense of intimacy as well.

With growing recognition of Alaskan-based fiction by writers like you and David Vann (Legend of a Suicide, Caribou Island), is there any sense that Alaskan fiction might one day be recognized as a regional force of its own, like Southern Ontario Gothic?

Absolutely. I think Alaskan fiction has been emerging with writers such as David Vann and also Seth Kantner, Nancy Lord, Lesley Thomas and others. There is a beautiful collection of diverse Alaskan writing and writers in a book I found called The Alaska Reader: Voices from the North. What’s strange is that although Alaska is part of the United States, Canadian literature seems to be more well-known in the lower 48. Some of my writer friends who are southerners have called my work “Northern Gothic.” I like the sound of that. I hope to be a part of the emergence of Alaskan literature – it would be an honor.
Categories: Arts & Culture

Tlingit Language Learners Group

Juneau Public Library Blog - Sat, 07/05/2014 - 3:03pm
Every Thursday at 6:00 pm at the Downtown Public Library This is a study group facilitated by language learners who are dedicated to the goal of revitalization of the Tlingit language. The group is free of charge and open to everyone in the community. No previous language experience is required or expected from anyone. Join in […]
Categories: Arts & Culture

Summer Reading Book Review Winners

Juneau Public Library Blog - Sat, 07/05/2014 - 2:36pm
Each week throughout the summer, the Juneau Public Libraries, in collaboration with the Friends of the Juneau Public Libraries and local businesses, award young readers various prizes for writing book reviews about their favorite summer reads. During the third week of this fun Summer Reading Program activity, the Juneau Public Libraries received 51 different book […]
Categories: Arts & Culture

Accepting movies for summer JUMP

JUMP Society - Mon, 06/09/2014 - 11:29am
Download this awesome poster! You’ll never get bad advice from three adult men wearing pug shirts, so go ahead and submit your short film for the JUMP 2014 Summer Film Fest! Deadline is July 10 or so. Screening at the Gold Town Nickelodeon July 17-20. See the guidelines and submission form for more info.
Categories: Arts & Culture

Hannah Lindoff’s Book Signing

Clarissa Rizal: Alaska Native Artist Blog - Tue, 06/03/2014 - 6:01pm

An illustration by Nobu Koch and Clarissa Rizal in Hannah Lindoff’s children’s book “Mary’s Wild Winter Feast”

Juneauite author Hannah Lindoff first children’s book “Mary’s Wild Winter Feast” is hot off the press.  Illustrated by artists Nobu Koch and Clarissa Rizal, both Hannah and Clarissa will be doing a book-signing the weekend of “Celebration” at 11am on Friday, June 13th at the Juneau Public Library.  Come on by and buy a copy of the book!

Categories: Arts & Culture

Doggone If She Flipped For A Cat Skan

Clarissa Rizal: Alaska Native Artist Blog - Thu, 05/22/2014 - 6:46am

Clarissa heads into the cat skan to check for internal bleeding…

The assessment after the bike accident (that happened on May 12th) revealed that my front brake system on my bike had gone awry causing the brakes to clamp down on the front tire which hurdled me over the bike, bouncing me on the cement street and hit my head on the curb!  At the urgency of my youngest daughter, she took me to the emergency room to make sure I had formed no blood clots or bleeding on the brain.  (And do you know how many thousands of dollars that cost!?)

To her relief, I was clean of harm…BUT my body suffered multiple bruises and I had sprained both hands/wrists badly, especially my left hand…I have not been able to do anything with my left hand except that although still painful, I can at least WEAVE!  Slowly but surely I can weave as long as I take breaks to not cause additional strain.

I ice-packed the sprain the first four days to reduce the swelling.  In addition, to assist with the brusing and a speedier recovery, I used the famous “Skookum” salve made by Harlena Warford in Hoonah, Alaska that you may buy on line from www.gutsuwu.com.  I swear by this product.  I applied this salve to all my bruised areas and to my bruised brow and face; it was amazing to see and feel the results!

And for continual circulation and support, I used my trusty “Incredibrace” for both wrists—I travel with these companions; they have been life-savers over the past year!

I am reminded every day how precious an artists hands are!

X-raying painful hand/wrist for broken bones!—there were none!

Categories: Arts & Culture

Spotted

Please Note: You may have disabled JavaScript and/or CSS. Although this news content will be accessible, certain functionality is unavailable.

Skip to News

« back

next »

  • title http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/321268/ http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/321253/ http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/321248/
  • title http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/321243/ http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/321208/ http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/320593/
  • title http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/321173/ http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/321163/
My Gallery

CONTACT US

  • 150 Trading Bay Rd, Kenai, AK 99611
  • Switchboard: 907-283-7551
  • Circulation and Delivery: 907-283-3584
  • Newsroom Fax: 907-283-3299
  • Business Fax: 907-283-3299
  • Accounts Receivable: 907-335-1257
  • View the Staff Directory
  • or Send feedback

ADVERTISING

SUBSCRIBER SERVICES

SOCIAL NETWORKING

MORRIS ALASKA NEWS