Worry free one-pan meals

For enthusiasts of one pot cooking (and who isn’t during the busy holiday season), Cook’s Country “One-Pan Wonders: Fuss Free Meals for Your Sheet Pan, Dutch Oven, Skillet, Roasting Pan, Casserole and Slow Cooker,” by the editors at America’s Test Kitchen, is a 138 recipe-filled page turner. With four–color photographs throughout, you’ll not only know how to make a dish, but what it should look like after it is cooked

Typical of America’s Test Kitchen format, the recipes are preceded with “Why this recipe works” notes, the compilation of comprehensive recipe testing and experimentation to offer no-fuss simplified recipes for meals that are full of vibrant, fresh flavor made from a variety of readily-available ingredients.

As a preview to the book’s diverse, easy to pull together meals, you’ll find recipes here for Breakfast Pizza and Sausage Lasagna. Satisfying and good for serving to family or overnight guests, the pizza (made with store-bought pizza dough), is a good vehicle for an egg and bacon breakfast or brunch , while the lasagna (making use of no-boil lasagna noodles), may just prove to be the most laid-back lasagna you’ve ever assembled. The lasagna calls for whole-milk ricotta cheese and because I really do love making homemade ricotta cheese, you’ll find my recipe for the cheese here, as well. It, too, is made with just one pot.

If one of your resolutions for the New Year includes finding ways to streamline your time in the kitchen, consider giving this brand new title a serious look. For further details, including how to purchase, visit https://americastestkitchen.buysub.com/homepage/pre-order-today-one-pan-wonders.html.

Sue Ade is a syndicated food writer with broad experience and interest in the culinary arts. She has worked and resided in the Lowcountry of South Carolina since 1985 and may be reached at kitchenade@yahoo.com.

Breakfast Pizza

Servings: 6

 

6 slices bacon

8 ounces (2 cups) mozzarella cheese, shredded

1 ounce (½ cup) Parmesan cheese, grated

4 ounces (½ cup) small-curd cottage

¼ teaspoon dried oregano

Salt and pepper

Pinch cayenne pepper

1 pound store-bought pizza dough, room temperature

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

6 large eggs

2 scallions, sliced thin

 

Adjust oven racks to middle and lowest positions and heat oven to 400 degrees. Place bacon in single layer on rimmed baking sheet and cook on upper rack until crisp, about 15 minutes, rotating sheet halfway through baking. Transfer bacon to paper towel–lined plate, let cool slightly, then crumble. Transfer rendered bacon fat to small bowl and reserve. Let sheet cool to room temperature, about 10 minutes.

Increase oven temperature to 500 degrees. Combine mozzarella and Parmesan in bowl. In separate bowl, combine cottage cheese, oregano, ¼ teaspoon pepper, cayenne and 1 tablespoon reserved bacon fat. Brush 1 tablespoon bacon fat over cooled, now-empty sheet.

Press and roll dough into 15 by 11-inch rectangle on lightly floured counter, then transfer to prepared sheet and push to edges of pan. Brush edges of dough with oil. Bake on lower rack until top of crust appears dry and bottom is just beginning to brown, about 5 minutes.

Remove sheet from oven and press on air bubbles with spatula to flatten. Spread cottage cheese mixture evenly over crust, leaving 1-inch border around edge, then sprinkle with crumbled bacon and cheese mixture. Using back of spoon, hollow out six 3‑inch-wide holes in cheese. Crack 1 egg into each hole and season each with salt and pepper.

Continue to bake pizza until crust is light golden around edges and eggs are just set, 9 to 10 minutes for slightly runny yolks or 11 to 12 minutes for soft-cooked yolks, rotating sheet halfway through baking.

Remove sheet from oven. Transfer pizza to cutting board and let cool for 5 minutes. Sprinkle with scallions, slice, and serve.

Sausage Lasagna

Do not use nonfat ricotta or fat-free mozzarella here. You will need a 12-inch ovensafe nonstick skillet for this recipe.” – America’s Test Kitchen. Photo credit: Keller + Keller and Carl Tremblay

 

Servings: 6

3 (14.5‑ounce) cans whole peeled tomatoes

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 onion, chopped fine

Salt and pepper

3 garlic cloves, minced

¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes

1 pound hot or sweet Italian sausage, casings removed

12 ounces (1½ cups) whole-milk ricotta cheese*

1 large egg yolk

1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme or ¼ teaspoon dried

8 ounces (2 cups) mozzarella cheese, shredded

¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese

12 no-boil lasagna noodles, broken in half

3 tablespoons chopped fresh basil

 

Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 375 degrees. Pulse tomatoes and their juice in food processor until coarsely ground, about 10 pulses.

Heat oil in 12‑inch oven-safe nonstick skillet over medium heat until shimmering. Add onion and ½ teaspoon salt and cook until onion is softened and lightly browned, 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in garlic and pepper flakes and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add sausage and cook, breaking up meat with wooden spoon, until no longer pink, about 5 minutes. Stir in processed tomatoes, bring to a simmer, and cook until sauce is thickened slightly, about 10 minutes; transfer to bowl.

In second bowl, combine ricotta, egg yolk, thyme, ½ teaspoon salt and ½ teaspoon pepper. Combine mozzarella and Parmesan in third bowl.

Spread ¾ cup sauce over bottom of now-empty skillet. Shingle 7 noodle halves around edge of skillet and place 1 noodle half in center. Dollop one-third of ricotta mixture over noodles, then top with one-quarter mozzarella mixture and one-third remaining sauce (in that order). Repeat layering process of noodles, ricotta mixture, mozzarella mixture and sauce twice more. Top with remaining mozzarella mixture. (Lasagna can be held at room temperature for 2 hours before baking.)

Transfer skillet to oven and bake until cheese is golden brown and lasagna is bubbling around edges, 30 to 40 minutes, rotating skillet halfway through baking. Remove skillet from oven (skillet handle will be hot). Let cool for 10 minutes, then sprinkle with basil and serve.

*Kitchen Ade note: If you’d like to try your hand at making homemade ricotta cheese, recipe follows.

Fresh Ricotta Cheese

Equipment

8 quart covered stainless steel saucepot with heavy bottom

Thermometer (one that goes from 0 to 220 degrees)

Large strainer or colander for draining curds

Cheesecloth, or linen (non-terry cloth) dish towel for lining strainer

Pot or large bowl to catch draining whey

Mesh strainer, or slotted spoon, for removing curds from saucepot

 

Ingredients

1 gallon whole milk (do not use ultra-pasteurized milk)

1 quart full fat buttermilk

1 pint heavy cream, preferably not ultra-pasteurized

1 teaspoon kosher salt, more or less to taste, optional

 

Yield: About 2 pounds

 

Line a large colander or strainer with several layers of cheesecloth. Place the cheesecloth-lined strainer over a large pot or bowl; set aside.

Place milk, buttermilk, heavy cream and salt in a large, heavy saucepot over medium-low heat. Bring the mixture to a gentle simmer, stirring occasionally, cooking until little bubbles appear on the surface. Continue heating, without stirring, until the temperature reaches 190 degrees, being careful not to let the mixture boil over. (Large, billowy cloudlike curds will form in the pot.) Remove the pot from heat and allow to stand, undisturbed, for 1 hour. (You do not have to cover the pot.)

Using a mesh sieve, or slotted spoon, ladle the curds into the prepared cheesecloth-lined colander. Gently pour the liquid (whey*) left in the cookpot over the solids in the cheesecloth. Allow to drain for 1 hour. (Be sure cheesecloth is not resting in liquid while it is draining.) Once the cheese is drained, store in an airtight container, in the refrigerator, for up to 5 days.

*Kitchen Ade note: If you opt to save the leftover whey for other recipes, such as using it to replace the water for making bread, be sure to store it in the refrigerator. Like the cheese, it is best used within 5 days.

More

Wed, 03/22/2017 - 11:07

Pioneer Potluck: Keeping Bob the Butcher on his feet

Bob wears several hats. Bob the Builder. Bob’s Bonfires. Bob the Butcher-man. There is Bob’s Cave. Bob’s Cave-Cat. Bob’s Car. Bob’s... Read more

Around the Web