Carey won't seek re-election

Borough mayor to focus on last months of term, not campaign

Borough Mayor Dave Carey announced Tuesday that he will not be running for re-election this fall.

 

That means the slate of candidates with signs around town and appearing at events is still four. The candidates so far are Dale Bagley and Fred Sturman of Soldotna, Debbie Brown of Kasilof, and Ron Long of Seward.

In his statement, which he said was timed to coincide with Flag Day, Carey said he cannot fulfill his oath to the borough and God to serve a 36-month term if he spends four of those months campaigning.

“Running for re-election could give me an unethical and even maybe an immoral advantage because I could make decisions that would help me get votes when I have taken an Oath of Office to serve everyone,” Carey said in a statement on Tuesday.

Carey also talked about his plans for the future in his announcement.
In the short-term, he is concerned with borough business, including implementing the 2012 budget.

“I will also be working with the Assembly on the process for how the borough decides on funding for non-profits and post-secondary education,” he said in statement.

Another of Carey’s priorities is to help the Borough keep pace with the internet-age. Carey said he wants to use technology to engage young adults.

Carey also mentioned an ordinance up for public hearing at the borough assembly’s June 21 meeting. That ordinance would prohibit the borough mayor from holding certain positions in any entity that receives a financial benefit from the borough. Homer’s Bill Smith brought the ordinance forward, and Carey said he thinks of it as the “Director Turner Ordinance.”

Effectively, the ordinance would prevent the mayor from teaching at Kenai Peninsula College, Carey said.

Neither Gary Turner, the director of KPC, or Carey were available for comment.

The mayor is also looking past the end of his term at what he plans to do next. Carey has served in public office since the 1980s, including a stint as Soldotna’s mayor. When he finishes this term, he may follow a religious calling, he said.

Carey said he intends to apply for a four-year program that would ordain him as a deacon. He has just finished a one-year program of discernment and training through the Catholic Church.

“I can think of no better way to spend the rest of my life than as a member of the Christian clergy trying to respond to God’s call,” Carey said in his statement.

Text of Carey announcement

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