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New moose regs limit hunting

Posted: August 12, 2011 - 7:00am

New regulations adopted by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game’s Board of Game will limit the size of a legal moose for at least this season and the next in Game Management Units 7 and 15, which make up all of the Kenai Peninsula.

The restrictions limit hunters to only harvesting bulls that are 50-inch wide in antler spread, or with at least four or more brow tines on one side, said Alaska Department of Fish and Game Wildlife Biolgist Thomas McDonough.

“The purpose behind greatly restricting the harvest opportunities is based on recent and dramatic decline in bull-to-cow ratio in many parts of the Kenai Peninsula,” he said.

In doing so, Fish and Game is basically eliminating the spike fork harvest and a portion of the big bull harvest that was previously in regulation, McDonough said.

While the restrictions are in place, Jeff Selinger, another Fish and Game Wildlife Biologist, thinks hunters will have a difficult time finding a legal moose.

“It’s going to be a lot harder to find a legal bull,” Selinger said. “That’s the bottom line.”

The regulations will last two years, new options will be looked at in 2013 at the Board of Game meetings depending on how the moose population responds, McDonough said.

Although the restrictions are strict, McDonough said they were necessary.

“I think the general theme here is the department understands this is a hardship and a huge restriction on hunting,” he said. “The purpose is to help with the long-term management of moose on the Kenai. We feel, and the Board of Game feels this restriction is really necessary.”

The regulations also prohibit non-residents from hunting in Units 15A or 15C.

Hunters will also be required to have the antlers inspected and sealed by Fish and Game within 10 days of the kill. 

Hunters can bring their antlers to Fish and Game offices in Anchorage, Homer or Soldotna during normal business hours throughout the week. Antlers can also get sealed at the Wildlife Trooper offices in Seward, Cooper Landing, Soldotna or Anchor Point by appointment.

To coincide with the Board of Game regulations, the Federal Subsistence Board issued an Emergency Action to restrict moose harvests in Units 7, 15A, 15B and 15C to one antlered bull with 50-inch antlers or four or more brow tines.

The archery-only season in Units 15A and 15B started on Wednesday and will continue through Aug. 17. The general season starts the same as usual, Aug. 20 and runs through Sept. 20.

For more information call the Fish and Game offices in Soldotna (262-9368) or Homer (235-8191). 

Hunting regulations are available in ADF&G offices and on line at www.wildlife.alaska.gov.

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robert white
378
Points
robert white 08/12/11 - 10:36 am
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moose

their's no moose because theirs to many bears, this reg will have little effect on someone trying to feed his family...

bearbait
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bearbait 08/12/11 - 11:21 am
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The fed and bears

....and there are too many bears because there are too many regulations protecting them.This can be directly linked to the fact that there is too much federally controlled land on the Kenai peninsula.How's the population doing on the federally managed moose refuge doing?Or should we rename it the Kenai National Bear Refuge and Wilderness Area?

alaskagunhunter
8
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alaskagunhunter 08/12/11 - 03:33 pm
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50" or 4

Its gonna take big money to find one in that slot. Better glass and wait for it to turn towards you before letting her fly. Gonna be a lot of near 50's left in the woods dead when they almost measured up but wouldnt hold still so we could measure it before we shot.

keeneye
10
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keeneye 08/12/11 - 07:06 pm
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"Its gonna take big money to

"Its gonna take big money to find one in that slot. Better glass and wait for it to turn towards you before letting her fly. Gonna be a lot of near 50's left in the woods dead when they almost measured up but wouldnt hold still so we could measure it before we shot."

This is about the most irresponsible thing any ethical hunter could say. An ethical hunter would not say it! You've just described wanton waste in the last portion of your post. You do give good and ethical advice in the second sentence. "Make sure of what you are shooting at" is a golden rule of hunting.

akmscott
131
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akmscott 08/12/11 - 07:34 pm
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Fish and Wildlife crew are a

Fish and Wildlife crew are a bunch of idiots bent on zero fish taken and no game shot-but make sure you buy their licenses to pay their wages!

kenai-king
255
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kenai-king 08/12/11 - 07:44 pm
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Moose Kenai Kings

Oh so its okay to take food off of our table for the right thing, but do not to take away money makers for the kenai king salmon.
And yes there are way to many bears!!!!!!

Dabutcher
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Dabutcher 08/13/11 - 10:59 am
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what works

Increase the bear hunting and have two years of spike only hunting, the spikes and spike fork bulls are the product of late breeding cows and first year cows, they are weaker and less likely to survive winter. They did this with the eastern Washington elk and had great success increasing the herd and overall bull ratio, there were more big bulls for early rut so more cows got bred in time to fully raise out their calves. Then they went to a spike general season and a branch antler draw season, works great for management and you end up with a much stronger herd overall. Bear may not be as tastey as moose but if you want to feed the fam... hey it beats storebought pork if its early season!!

jsparky49
0
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jsparky49 08/15/11 - 10:42 pm
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too many bears?

Are you all insane, do any of you really hunt? Brownies are definitely not abundant, and how many blacks take moose? Two black bears a year is not too many restrictions if you ask me. Too many cars on the road? Now that I can agree with, road kills, over hunting, harsh winters, and predation all factor in. Don't get me wrong I wont hunt moose again until the restrictions come off, but only because I like the tender younger moose. There is plenty of other opportunity if you want to work for it, caribou in the mountains, dall sheep, and black bear are delicious. But then you might have to actually get out of your truck or off your four wheeler.
I do agree with you though moose kenai kings, they will take this from us but not the kings when it means a loss of outa state dollars.

Hunt
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Hunt 08/16/11 - 12:08 am
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Bears and moose

Well first off to jsparky49, you are ignorant if you dont think there is to many brown bears on the Kenai. Obviously you dont hunt or get off your wheeler or you would know that. Right now there is one in front of my house that charged a lady on her horse yesterday. I had 7 different brown bears on my bait this spring and another 5 or 6 different bears on another bait not even a mile away. I spend a lot of time black bear hunting in the spring and believe me there is way to many bears around here. If you call Jeff sellinger he will tell you the same, but he wont do anything about it cause him and Larry Lewis are spineless. They try and blame our low moose numbers on everything but the bears. It amounts to nothing but poor wildlife management. They did the same thing in unit 16 look what happend there! They need to spend more time managing wildlife and not trying to manage people. I.E. bear awareness and bear proof garbage cans ext.. There wouldnt be bears in town if they had plenty of moose to eat. If they dont allow brown bear hunting soon you can look forward to more bears in town and more DLP'S and more maulings. Which I think if someone gets mauled or killed fish and game should be held accountable. Theres no doubt that there is to many brown bears around.

Our fish and wildlife officers conducted a bear bait survey two years ago to see how many brown bears were on the penninsula using DNA hair samples collected off of theese baits. They havent released the numbers yet and its been two years!! Wonder why?? My guess is there is way more bears than our brilliant biologist think there is, and they dont want to look like idiots by telling everyone??

Heres something else to think about, if our biologist new what they were doing we wouldnt be in this position with low moose numbers and way high brown bear numbers. There job is to manage our fish and game, and there obviously not doing it?

The theory of spike forks was to get rid of the bad genetics. Well just cause a year and a half old moose has a spike or fork doesnt mean he has bad genetics, it means he is a year and a half old moose. If they were allowed to live long enough to grow up so would there antlers!! By living longer they would get smarter and more of them would make it to maturity. That will produce more bigger bulls and therefore more breeding bulls which makes more moose. After the moose population recovers the regs should be any bull over 36" is legal. There is no doubt that this will produce more bigger moose to be harvested and breed.

The Penninsula has a lot of thick country and swamps. If every hunter was allowed one brown bear every other year there is still no way humanly possible to hurt our brown bear population. There is to much refuge land and state parks that limit a lot of access other than using horses.
They also say that there is little access for brown bears to move down on the penninsule beacuse of the narrow and mountainess area connecting the penninsula to the rest of the state. That is another reason they are protecting them. Thats another ignorant assumption beacuse there is no need for bears to move to the penninsula. There is more than enough food and breeding females here, there is no need for bears to move to the penninsula to keep a healthy number of bears around.

In my opinion there should be a state funded bounty on brown bears and wolves on the penninsula like there is in McGrath. They now have a very healthy moose population due to this and there are still plenty of bears around. We need to put pressure on Larry and Jeff our wannabe biologist and get something done before its to late. Feel free to call the commisioner also!!

For all you tree hugging Obama lovers that disagree with me come on over I'll take you out and let you play with the bears in my front yard!!

Dabutcher
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Dabutcher 08/16/11 - 12:50 am
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@ hunt

Hey Brother bear hunter, I'm with ya on there being way too many bears, I think a big part of it is the bad rap Bear meat gets in AK...hey it's good stuff in my book! As far as the spike moose, this is a hard one for alot of people to get around but follow me on this...the highest mortality rate on moose is the young right? it has to be because moose aren't born old right? so it follows that old moose are whats left from the young ones that were killed sooo the biggest population of moose are the young ones....these young moose die from 1---being dumb, I mean inexpirienced and 2--- being smaller; less fat, thermal mass and just easier to kill by the preds, heck they have less to eat than their older, taller relatives... our underdog loving American hearts want these little guys to grow up...BUT the truth is, if we kill the bigger moose..i.e. those better suited to survive winter kill and preds, and the winter and the preds eat the little ones, what the hell is left for next year? better to hunt the little ones in august-oct and let the bigguns kick some wolfy butt all winter for a couple years, then let a set number of big (truly big) moose be hunted there after...just like the diminishing size of the kenai kings by big fish killing natural selection... hunting only big moose will have a stunting effect on the gene pool...I've seen it work on elk, I was opposed to it when they did it (when i was a young hunter in Wa) but the proof is in the pudding...oh and as far as the small genetics in Washington elk...how do you think it got that way? rack hunting! yep, killing the biggest of the herd, or exactly what AK wants us to do to our moose now!!!!

Hunt
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Hunt 08/16/11 - 01:37 am
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bears and moose

I agree with most of that but if we dont let the young ones live there wont be any moose to grow up? Most of the spikes and forks are healthy enough to make another winter if they made it through the first one. If they are spike forks during moose season that means they made it through one winter already because you obviously cant shoot them there first year. Most of them will live through winter time. If the are given a year or two to live and learn they wont be so easy to kill like the spikes and forks are. There is big bulls close to town but you really have to hunt to find them because they are smart. They have been shot at and had arrows flung at them. Therefore when they hear four wheelers everywhere they go noctournal during moose season. I saw several bulls during bow season last year that were 50 plus but good luck getting an arrow in one!

By not hunting spike forks it will help our moose population, but it will also cause more poaching and more 45-49 inch moose being shot and left. People will take more chances than normal on theese moose that are close to 50 because they know that they wont get a moose to feed there family if they dont.

Another problem is the amount of inefficient bow hunters wounding moose and not recovering them. I have found many wounded moose from this. I bow hunt myself and am totally for it but, I think they need a new instructor and stiffer regs and more frequent certifications. When I took my test they instructor seemed to relaxed and just wanted to get everyone in and out as fast as he could.
There was a lady shooting a recurve that missed just about every target on her first shot. She wasnt ready to get certified in my opinion and obviously hadnt practiced very much. They passed her though!! What [filtered word] me off is that the only guy they failed was an old timer that did an excellent job shooting his bow but couldnt shoot from a kneeling position. So what if he couldnt shoot from a kneeling posotion. If he cant do it in the coarse he damn sure isnt going to do it in the feild! It was so sad to see this old timer crushed because of a stupid rule and watch a woman shooting a recuvre get passed when she has no business in the feild.
Black bears are excellent in the spring and for the bonehead that thinks they dont kill moose I got news for you. I shot a 6'8" black bear on Tustamena Lake that was laying on a full grown cow moose that he had just killed by himself! He was also in bad shape. According to our biologist he was 25+ years old and was missing his two bottom k9's and only had one eye! Yet he still managed to kill that big cow by himself.

Hunt
0
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Hunt 08/16/11 - 01:39 am
0
0
moose and bears

Oh and we have been killing all the little ones for years now thats why there is no moose, thats obviously not working here.

keeneye
10
Points
keeneye 08/16/11 - 02:02 am
0
0
@Hunt

you talk about a bear killing a cow. I have pics of a blacky killing not one but two calves. IMHO I believe that it where the biggest mortality rate is coming from. I have seen fewer calves this year.

Hunt
0
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Hunt 08/16/11 - 02:22 am
0
0
@ Keeneye

I agree with you there bro. Black bears are very sneaky and quiet. They are hard to hunt locally inless you bait them. To all of you that think baiting is un ethical. You ever watch deer hunting on tv? Thats the same thing they plant a crop to lure deer and everyones just fine with that!
Part of there management program is havesting mature bucks and letting the little ones grow and it seems to be working really well for them. I think if we get rid of some bears and let the moose population get back up, that it wouldnt hurt to take spikes out but let fork horns and bigger live to a mature age. I have hunted some properly managed areas in alaska where spikes and forks were legal but there was way to many big bulls to ever have a need to shoot a little one. If the meat is properly taken care of and not in the rut the big ones taste just as good as the little ones.

Dabutcher
0
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Dabutcher 08/16/11 - 12:23 pm
0
0
WOW

Ok...follow what I am saying...the little ones have the highest mortality rate, they will die anyway, the big ones breed more cows, pass on better genes (they made it to "big" for a reason, right?) and survive natural predation better...stop thinking in terms of "letting the little ones grow up" the big ones WERE the SUCCESSFUL little ones, if you kill them and leave the small ones then you have a herd being bred by the runts and the untested young...one winter on Mom's teat doesn't make it a survivor... kill the smaller ones because they are going to die anyway...geez does it get easier? MANY WILL SURVIVE, BECAUSE THERE ARE MORE OF THEM THAN THE OLDER ONES... cleaner kills, because they are easier to kill (duh), less killed on the hwy, because the older ones know better, and less available easy kills for the preds...ALL of them...the size of the rack doesn't prove your "manlyness". Yearling moose aren't less moral to hunt, and frankly (as my username implys) I have seen ALOT of moose meat wasted getting a monster out of the woods/swamps that soured in the process and left to freezer burn year after year in the bottom of the freezer, check out the craigslist "free" section, freezerburned fish and meat given away as dogfood...kill what you "will" eat... eat what you kill... we only freeze good steaks, 100 lbs of burger and can ALL tough cuts (that meat always goes first!)

Hunt
0
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Hunt 08/16/11 - 05:25 pm
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0
@ Dabutcher

Ok kinda makes sense, but it hasnt been working!! How hard is that to understand? If you kill all the little ones you wont ever have any moose to grow up and be big! Bigger moose are harder to hunt and way smarter therefore you wont hurt a damn thing by killing some of them. There will be plenty of big ones left to breed. Fish and game knows killing the small ones is hurting our moose population. Why do you think they closed it this year??
Either way they do it nothing will work inless we kill some brown bears. However by letting the little ones live for a couple years you will start seeing a higher bull to cow ratio without a doubt. Just look around in the next two years you will see more bulls.

Dabutcher
0
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Dabutcher 08/17/11 - 12:21 am
0
0
Ok...

The reason it hasn't been working is because we have been shooting the big ones AND the little ones...you can't kill ALL the young-uns just like you can't get all of the big ones...but...the reason why the big ones are harder to hunt is because in part of smarts, but also there just aren't as many of them... THAT ALL BEING SAID, it's not up to us... what we CAN do is take advantage of every opportunity to whack a pred! wolves, coyotes, bears...hell if you see a big enough vole, stomp that bugger too (hehe, just kidding) the point is we can do something as sportsmen (and women!)...how many hunters on the KP get all the bears available to them? how about wolves? food for thought...and good luck out there...hey don't forget to take out a kid to whack a bunny when the snow flies!!! I have three going this year!

denseyler@yahoo.com
46
Points
denseyler@yahoo.com 08/19/11 - 12:32 pm
0
0
I propose that we close the

I propose that we close the moose season totally. And then make it mandatory that all cars and trucks be equipped with moose bumpers. I'm sure all have seen the 'Give moose a brake' signs with a tally of the moose kills for the winter. Then the moose season will run all year long and be either sex. How much better could that be?

ak4hunters
0
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ak4hunters 08/20/11 - 02:08 am
0
0
You think this is bad

Anyone read the article in the Redoubt Reporter? Selinger thinks the problem with the declining moose population is the bunnies! And states predation is not a significant factor. Is this guy incompetent or what? How did we go from Spraker to Selinger, talk about one end of the spectrum to the other.

gunsrgood
0
Points
gunsrgood 08/25/11 - 11:56 am
0
0
overpopulation of brown bears

I've hunted in Alaska for over 10 years now and Moose out of Dillingham for the last 4 years. Each year we have seen the brown bear population explode! If memory serves we counted 38 different brown bears in a 10 day hunt last year. And we were hunting a lake!...not like we were floating. I'd jump at the chance to hunt a brownie but the cost of a guide is wayyyy out of my price range. I've killed a 7'3" black bear in SE and have LOTS of hunting experience. If they would open brown bears to non-residents without a guide for 2-3 years, it would be a great benefit to the moose populations which have declined horribly over the last 4 years. I don't understand why the regs allow a sibling of a resident to brown bear hunt without a guide but not an experienced hunter. It's just not logical. If they were really concerned with wildlife rather than the guide lobby, they'd make an exception to put a dent in the brown bear population to include non-residents without a guide.

Citizen17
21
Points
Citizen17 08/25/11 - 09:55 pm
0
0
Limited hunting

I have hunted in Alaska for 30 years and I have seen our freedoms continuously deteriorate to the point where the hunting rules and regulations seem to be coming from the lower 48, instead of from our own localities. This new 4 brow tine - 50" regulation is another attempt to discourage hunting in Alaska. What will happen is this: sublegal bulls will continue to be shot. This may be due, in part, to lack of experience, impatience, "buck fever", ignorance, willful poaching, or an honest mistake in identification. This new regulation will not solve the "bull/cow" ratio as our educated biologists are claiming. It will, however, decrease the hunting pressure until the subsistence season commences when the slope workers from Ninilchik go to "federal" lands with their $50,000 trucks and their high dollar 4 wheelers to decimate the moose population in the name of subsistence. Also, they keep telling us that the bears, both brown and black, are not a problem. It's obvious to this citizen that the federal government is really in control of all of Alaska's lands and laws. How else could it be so screwed up? BTW: If you shot an illegal moose, would you turn yourself in?

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