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Kenai woman indicted on drug, gun charges

Posted: February 2, 2012 - 9:42am

A 48-year-old Kenai woman was indicted by a federal grand jury Jan. 20 on multiple drug and gun charges.

Doris Jean Lageson faces seven counts, which include participating in drug trafficking conspiracy, using a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking offense, three counts of money laundering, providing a firearm to a felon and being a felon in possession of a firearm.

Lageson's earliest charged activity began in July 2009, when she sent the first of three Western Union wire transfers of alleged drug distribution proceeds to co-conspirators in Bakersfield, Calif., according to the indictment. The amounts listed were $600, $5,700 and $5,730.

The indictment further alleged Lageson conspired with others to distribute methamphetamine. In October 2010, Lageson, who is a convicted felon, unlawfully possessed a handgun, and gave the handgun to a person she knew was a convicted felon.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Homeland Security and the Bureau of Alcohol, Firearms and Explosives all participated in the investigation leading to the case's indictment, according to a Department of Justice press release.

Alaska State Troopers and the Kenai Police Department also were extensively involved in Lageson's case, said Assistant United States Attorney Kim Sayers-Fay in an email.

"The Troopers and KPD instigated the case, consistently pursued federal prosecution and facilitated many aspects of the investigation and eventual bust of Lageson's drug operation," she said.

Sayers-Fay presented the case to the grand jury.

According to court records, Lageson has been charged many times for fourth-degree assault and varying degrees of theft.

The drug trafficking conspiracy offense carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in jail, three years supervised release and a $1 million fine. The money laundering offenses entail similar maximum penalties, like up to 20 years in jail, three years supervised release and a fine not to exceed $500,000 or twice the amount laundered.

As a property that facilitated a drug trafficking offense, the prosecution also is seeking to forfeit Lageson's residence.

Lageson's trial is scheduled for April 2 in Anchorage.

Jerzy Shedlock can be reached at jerzy.shedlock@peninsulaclarion.com.

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kenaibear2001
119
Points
kenaibear2001 02/02/12 - 08:07 pm
0
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I feel really protected now

Wow,.... FBI, BATFE, Homeland Security ( who are these guys?) State Troopers and KPD. Only ones left out were Boy Scouts. No wonder drugs are so easily obtainable on the Peninsula. Everyone was working on this case since 2009.

msjinxie
131
Points
msjinxie 02/02/12 - 10:21 pm
0
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LOL

Kenaibear I loved your comment! I kinda started thinking the same thing through the article, then I read your comment LOL was awesome! Good job :D

motely
238
Points
motely 02/02/12 - 11:11 pm
0
0
Interesting

This particular fine citizen in our communtiy destroys peoples lives for years upon years and the thousands and thousands of dollars spent to make the big bust, what about all the Heroin killing the young kids, coming staight from anchorage, or how about the spice store selling the synthetic speed reeking havok in the schools, if the cops really wanted to do something productive and not spend 1/4 of a million dollars for 2 years undercover work on people like Doris, hahaha how about spending some of our tax dollars and run a dog through fed ex, Great Job men !! Doris is off the street it only took 10 years, yah righttttttttttt

BigRedDog
659
Points
BigRedDog 02/03/12 - 07:50 am
0
0
Failed policies

Now it's the BIG money time, and Doris is fixing to cost the tax payers what $30,000 a year to jail? What will be spent to do that for say 10,7, or even 5 years. It's really kinda scary to think there is somebody out there right now trying to pick up her slack! That it took 2 years and all this huge Federal resource to catch Doris is kind of disheartening. That 30K might be a little on the low side but who can afford it for 10 ,7,or 5 years? I'm not even going to mention the huge cost of these fine law enforcement agencies. But the system seems to be a self feeding ever gorging monster, eating us out of house and home. It's not that society condones Doris's actions, it's that we will soon be unable to pay for this type of correction policy.
The only way to really address the issue is to go ahead and say it like it is, "I'm tired of seeing so much of our tax dollars thrown, at this non-solution!" We need to spend every dollar we can wisely, and even then we may not be able to buy everything society is demanding from government. We as a state or republic would be better of to give Doris free drugs and sign her up for an outpatient rehab program. Current policy will someday put Doris back on the street with a huge burden of a felony rap sheet hampering employment greatly. You see Doris is not just going away,(well she is really going away for some time but she will be back) making her behavior cost the public so much money is the problem. This is being repeated everyday in small towns like Kenai and Soldotna all across the Nation.
How many more examples do we need before we must say please try another route to get where we're going. The fire- arms in this case greatly changes all aspects of this activity and Doris will soon learn it cost to play with guns! But the war on drugs is really a war on American's pocketbook and these tremendous cost are not going away with Doris.

CommonSense101
0
Points
CommonSense101 02/03/12 - 11:00 am
0
0
Good Work!

I have to admit that I am troubled by the above comments. Does it really matter how long a case takes or how much money it costs to rid a low-life woman whom pollutes our society? Regardless of how long it took, It is appreciated by this individual and all of my friends who go about life the proper way; Respecting those who protect us by working long hours makeing our world a better place to live. Your above comments are a slap in the face to those who already have a thank-less job. Kudos to our Federal Agents, Alaska State Troopers and Local Police. Thank You for what you do each and every day! Shame on those of you whose comments are based on not knowing a damn thing!

BigRedDog
659
Points
BigRedDog 02/03/12 - 06:46 pm
0
0
101

That easy money is still there, and it would be foolish think that someone isn't right there to take what Doris left. Just like a revolver a new person in the barrel, but it's still Doris in persona. It is truly a shame that our legal system has come to where it required that much investment in these good officers lives and careers to put Doris out of commission. Again the weapons makes this case special. But the war on drugs has spiraled into a great class war against our own people.
Take the money out of drugs and you remove the criminal activity associated with it. But as long as there is an easy buck or even a hard one some fool will play for it! We as a society will pay for those like Doris and when we are done paying we will have an older less skilled and or unemployable burden on society. Maybe a little alternative treatment would take the profit out of the equation and interrupt the next Doris.

tyshee
2
Points
tyshee 02/05/12 - 04:02 pm
0
0
Prevention

The key word for preventing drug abuse is preventative treatment and counseling. Many users were from a home where drugs, alcoholism, sexual abuse, physical abuse, mental illness, incarceration of parent or other situations prevailed. The statistics for children of users is very high. With children of incarcerated mothers seventy five percent and up are likely to become incarcerated also. What are we doing to prevent this? We do not have even one long term facility in the state for hard core users (needles and opiates) and counseling is a joke. Many of these people have long term issues and seeing a counselor anywhere from every two weeks to every six weeks does little good. Incarcerated parents need to learn life skills, receive counseling and learn a trade. Anything less just cost more and more as the parent will end up returning to jail, the child ends up in the state system and eventually may be come incarcerated and a user. We need to look at spending more on preventative issues by targeting young children and using the wholistic approach on the entire family. We need methadone clinics, job training and then we need to look at quest cards and their misuse. People trade them for cash, drugs and so forth and they are not being used for food in many cases. We need better education on drug prevention in the schools. We need to educate the community on addictions, warning signs and symtoms and other drug related issues. This war on drugs is not working on every level. To be angry at the Doris' of this world will not prevent this disease that has spread across our entire nation. Incarcerating all these people and then letting them out only to have them continuously be returned to prison is a failure on our part and costing far more money than one realizes. Money that could be spent on rehabilitation. Many people in jail are mentally ill and began using drugs to try and feel normal and ease the illness. Yet we persist on spending money on incarceration and tighten on budgets on mental illness. We are the failures if we do not find a way to make the system work because the Doris' are just the people we have failed.

witchwitch
51
Points
witchwitch 02/06/12 - 02:01 pm
0
0
Criminal justice system has failed it's intended purpose...

If a criminal sells drugs to minors they should go to jail or if their drugs kill someone they should face manslaughter charges. Otherwise, until they start prosecuting beer truck drivers and cigarette vendors, it flat out amazes me that thinking adult Americans can accept such hypocrisy. Too many government policies don't work.

This amount to a hugely expensive government work projects for the drug enforcers, prosecutors and jailers, all for the benefit of government employees. People are losing respect for our system and those who are imprisoned are released to become better criminals, thus insuring that the government employees will never finish and their agencies grow larger and more expensive every day.

What we have, as a society is a result of failed and destructive policies. If you believe that drug use is harmful, then teach your children your values and don't use drugs. Expecting the current system to solve this problem is like pouring fuel on the fire.

We didn't find weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, but ex-VP Dick Cheney's friends at Halliburton made billions of dollars. This travesty is no different.

BigRedDog
659
Points
BigRedDog 02/07/12 - 09:12 am
0
0
We need to reach 101

Thanks for the support or at least thoughtful comments, and I just wonder if 101 read the last two comments. So from a budget perspective, I wonder what percentage of the entire war on drugs budget is being wasted on Prevention? If are we trying to prevent drug abuse, what percent of the budget in our war on drugs is going for just that, prevention? Seems a great deal of that money is going towards punishing those that abuse drugs, with a dime being spent on actually preventing or interrupting the cycle of drug abuse!
I know it's a hard question, but just what is being spent towards that goal of preventing not just punishing behavior. Is there a chance that taking the money out of the equation would remove the profit for the criminal activity associated with addictive behavior? It is very hard to make people look outside the box, and I know here we are asking that you also think outside the box just a little. I don't have all the answers to the mountain of questions and issues changes in the current policies would bring. However I think there would be oceans of difference in societies response if the money was just a little more balanced toward the goal of prevention. Maybe 101 has some thoughts about prevention that would make a difference.
I just think when we look at the big picture, just fighting the war on drugs is not enough! You see we need to WIN, the war on drugs. It is very hard to disassociate punishment from prevention, but I do think in the long run that will be the only effective method of overcoming drug abuse. Punishing behavior generally results in more radical or drastic actions in response. Maybe if we drain the swamp bye taking the money out of the equation we won't have to deal with all those gators. But be honest, is this "War on Drugs" really working?

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