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Nikiski community hopes to address junk cars

Posted: January 6, 2013 - 4:49pm  |  Updated: January 16, 2013 - 11:26pm
Richard McGahan, 76, Dale McGahan's brother, has cluttered his work shop with parts from more than 200 sitting on his property.
Richard McGahan, 76, Dale McGahan's brother, has cluttered his work shop with parts from more than 200 sitting on his property.

To some they are trash, rusting in yards and crumbling in fields. To others they are heirlooms, treasures of a time past, reminders of what was.

Trash or treasures, though, removal of the thousands of junked vehicles scattered about Nikiski is a top priority for the area’s community council, according to its action plan. The ongoing endeavour is also part of the council’s effort to improve the community’s image.

“There’s people living in absolute filth with their yards cluttered the way they are,” Council President Fred Miller said. “Hopefully we can offer an opportunity for people to say, ‘Hey, can you help me? We don’t have the money to get rid of all this stuff.’”

The vehicles are also a potential threat to the environment, said Steve Russell, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation environmental program manager for prevention and emergency response. Russell said while the vehicles do not pose an immediate threat to Nikiski’s groundwater reserves, due to their broad distribution, they could damage plant and animal life with long-term leaking fluids.

On the state level, there is nothing profound about Nikiski’s junked car collections, said Lori Aldrich, DEC solid waste program regional coordinator. But, for areas with council ordinances addressing the matter, Nikiski ranks high.

In December the council ratified the community’s action plan, which sent $100,000 in a state grant and $27,756 in a community revenue sharing grant to its Junk Car Removal Project. Already the council has spent four years and $53,000 in state grants hauling roughly 300 abandoned vehicles from woods, fields and yards.

But there are still more, said Charlie Rediske, owner of Reddi Towing and Junk Car, the towing company that removes the cars.

“You get up in a small plane and fly over the area, and you’d be surprised, especially in the summer time. It’s like glitter,” he said. “There’s cars everywhere. It doesn’t seem like you’ve done much.”

From the Sleepers Trailer Court — once a retrofitted junk yard — Rediske said he has likely hauled about 2,000 cars. And that location, he said, probably held about 4,000.

But clearing the cars from Nikiski needs to be done delicately, Miller said.

“I just can’t walk onto someone’s property and say, ‘Hey, you got potential ground water contamination here for your neighbor.’ I mean, he’s going to shoot me off with a shotgun,” he said.

The owners of the cars, or those that inherited the vehicles with their property, do have to nominate them for removal, Miller said.

Often property owners are thrilled to see the junked cars go, Rediske said.

“In fact, I get wives who are waiting for their husbands to leave so they can call me,” he said. “You got to be pretty careful; you can get some pissed-off people.”

But there are also those who do not see the rusting wreckage as front-yard flotsam.

“You read about these guys,” Miller said. “I got to laugh, but they said they remember Gramp going over to Grandfather’s house and, anytime something of Grandfather’s broke down, he’d just go rummage around the yard until he found the part that he needed.

“So there’s this mindset that these things are these little treasure piles, and of course as people get older or they pass away or move on, you get all these legacy deposits.”

Those “legacy deposits,” he said, for many are vestiges of the homesteading era, when families in the 1950s and ‘60s would collect the family, pack the truck and drive north into a land unknown.

The McGahans are one of those families. Dale McGahan and his two parents and eight siblings left from Michigan when the government closed their farm. They drove to the end of the road.

When McGahan was 17, after his family had settled on their claim, he bought what was at the time the fastest car on the Peninsula, he said — a 1957 Chevy with a 283 V8 engine.

He drove it at high speeds down the Peninsula’s graveled and potholed roads for three years, he said, until the transmission blew out and he had to lay it to rest in the field behind the house.

In those days in Alaska, he said, automobiles were so cheap and money was so plentiful that replacing a car was a causal investment. And, a new car meant old parts from the leftovers.

With “the type of roads out here, the gravel roads, I was buying a new car every year,” he said. “A new car or a new pickup. It was rough on the equipment. I drove them like a madman because I was young.”

So his ’57 Chevy sat there, for 40 years, and he moved on. He bought other automobiles — a 1960 Plymouth Fury, Ford pickups, more cars — and the Chevy slowly crumbled into the ground and the grass grew tall.

In that same field four other vehicles still collect rust. And on his brother’s property are probably nearly 200 various vehicles, some with trees jutting through them.

Some of the vehicles collected by the McGahans — including that '57 Chevy — have been restored. Others have been sold for their parts.

“My five brothers, well, they had to park a rig or two up there, too,” Dale McGahan said.

When McGahan looks at the trucks, cars, graters, busses and tractors he recalls his homesteading days.

“It’s really sentimental value just where they are,” he said, “because they were there when we were young and kids. You go down there and look back. It brings back memories.”

Like the time he bought three cars off of Skip White's father for $25. Or how he and his brothers and sisters used to use the hoods from old cars to sled down hills. How he used to run into snow banks to get his brother’s nose out of books when they were driving together.

Or of the time he met his wife outside the movie theater in his ’57 Chevy. He said he rolled down his window to say hello, but she kept walking, he said. Then she turned around.

“Nice car,” she told him. He said that’s when he knew he had a chance.

“Those were good memories,” he said.

Dan Schwartz can be reached at daniel.schwartz@peninsulaclarion.com

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1coldalaskan
35
Points
1coldalaskan 01/06/13 - 06:43 pm
2
2

Resourceful

I have spent many, many hours pulling parts off of these vehicles. This article is a disgrace. This looks and smells to me like it is a poorly done piece of reporting that uses bits and pieces from different people to get what was wanted.
Where did the author come from, California? No. Massachusetts. He should maybe consider moving back, as they already have legislation, codes and every other type of government control. Why move to Kenai and try to make it like the East Coast. Please consider the following:

1. When I was much younger I drove a 1979 Chevy pick-up Often times I was too broke to buy parts when it broke, Richard McGahan gave them to me in order to keep my truck running.

2. I have watched as the McGahans have raced for decades, DECADES, at the Kenai Raceway circle track. They have pulled a-arms, wheels, frames and whole cars from Richard's property in order to keep their race cars and race truck running. This is a great family bonding experience. Subsequently, I have seen many other racers come out to get a much needed part for their car, often time Richard gives it to them in order to keep people racing.

3. I have children that know how to remove and replace and "make things work" because their grandfather has a shop and more importantly the homesteader mentality to get things done. Ask yourself if your 15 year old can remove and replace an engine....by himself. If your teenage sons daughters can build, maintain and race a truck, with just some oversight from a wise old homesteader grandpa.

4. I am disappointed to see the Clarion run an article on junk cars in Nikiski. If the intent was to have an article that focused on clean-up, run that article. If you want to interview Richard McGahan about his cars, then get the whole story.

5. There have been multiple high school students receive credit for a semester of shop as he gave them hands-on learning of practical auto maintenance skills.

6. As commercial beach set net fishermen, often times need a piece or a part to make something work. We have pulled pieces of aluminum, wheels, and various other components to get things done.

This story wasn't about Richard McGahan. This was an article completely made out of another persons interview and you used Richard to look like the proverbial "bad guy".

This should have been an article about the history, legacy and family traditions that the McGahan's have brought to Nikiski and the Kenai Peninsula over the last 55 years. The interview that you had with Richard was about racing cars, antique and collector cars and the truck he drove up from Michigan in the late 1950's. Instead you made the man who pushed the North Road through past Nikiski Beach Road look like a criminal. This was poor, sloppy and demeaning reporting.

Tony Jackson

spwright
1376
Points
spwright 01/07/13 - 12:57 am
5
1

Forget Pebble Mine 1/6/13

Sun. 1/6/13 Kenai Peninsula Residents Rant & Rave about the POSSIBILITY of a Pebble Mine being developed across Cook Inlet.
But these same local residents won't say a word about generation after generation of RUSTY OLE JUNK YARDS.
All of which started with the Homesteaders after WWII & continues to this day.

& Yes these Rusty Ole Junkers leak Toxic Fluids.
Gasoline, Diesel, Battery Acid, Motor Oil, Transmission Fluid,Grease,Anti-Freeze,Brake Fluid, etc,etc,etc.

WHY do we accept this contamination of Our Alaska ?

Your Neighbor's collection of Rusty Ole Junkers is polluting your very own neighborhood.

These Junk Yards are literately Everywhere all over Our Peninsula. 3 are within a stone's throw of My Home.
Drive any where outside of any City Limits & you will find
these Butt Ugly Mountians of Rusty Ole Junkers.

Peninsula Scrap & Salvage 262-7258 K-Beach Road once would Pay $100.00 per vehicle. I don't know If that is still the policy ?

& Yes I hate the sight of Junk Yards & yes those should be eliminated from Our Peninsula.

Steve Wright, Soldotna, Echo Lake Road

motely
238
Points
motely 01/07/13 - 01:21 am
1
1

Re : resourseful

Oh yah mcgahans always the VICTIM,
They built Nikiski, and they are always the VICTIM,
I, along with a 1000 people could talk about how great they all are, guess what !! there not all that honest and great ! Richard Yes but all of them are not,

cheapersmokes
278
Points
cheapersmokes 01/07/13 - 08:31 am
2
2

Living in the Past

Folks, Unfortunately the world is constantly changing and you cannot press the "pause" button. People must take pride in ownership of their property and remove these junkers and other trash from their property! Unless your currently driving the same year and model as one non-running vehicle parked on your property then all others must go. When that vehicle dies then they both must go.

My first view of this area and also the Homer spit was that it was in great need of a massive cleanup week. Remove the parts you might need and then put the vehicles back into the recycling system to be used again and take some pride in the appearance of your property!

nikiskikaren
13
Points
nikiskikaren 01/07/13 - 09:10 am
2
2

Deceitful reporting

There is a lesson to be learned here. This reporter was very friendly and came and visited Richard. He never mentioned the purpose of this article or the council. Richard thought he was being interviewed about his antique cars and racing. Although Richard's picture is used, none of the article is an interview with him. The picture would have you assume the interview was with him. The lesson is: If you ever have an interview with Dan Schwartz, insist that you see and approve the article before it is printed. It's too bad, in a small community, that it's come to this type of reporting.

bigtalkahh
184
Points
bigtalkahh 01/07/13 - 09:15 am
2
2

Junk Cars

I love to explore junkyards. I think about the life that each individual once had... where it traveled and who it carried. I don't really think that old parked cars pollute our land any more than the ones that are running down the road today. Private property is sacred. Keep your nose out of other people's affairs and we will all be better off.

spwright
1376
Points
spwright 01/07/13 - 09:38 am
2
3

bigtaslkahh 1/7/13

fyi: Our very own Peninsula Land Fill was sued (early 80's) by the neighborhood residents because of pollution leaking from
RUSTY OLE JUNK CARS contaminating the drinking water
That forced the land fill to begin using a liner to prevent that pollution in the future.
So YES Rusty Ole Junk Cars are a source of pollution.

Yes You have the right to have your own Private Property but that does NOT give you the right to pollute & contaminate the land & water.
SPW

Carroll M. Knutson
7
Points
Carroll M. Knutson 01/07/13 - 04:11 pm
5
2

Junk Cars

I'm a homesteader's brat too and like to remind my fellow pioneers to the Peninsula, when we first settled here there weren't 5000 souls on the entire Peninsula. Now there are over 55,000 not counting visitors and snowbirds, and that many people create too darned much trash! Those who insist on keeping their "fond memories " in their yards are devaluing their neighbors property as well as their own and lack the respect for our land they profess to have for their country.
For those who came to Alaska to escape regulation and zoning, you need to realize that most of us came to escape the environmental and visual pollution created by your kind outside.
Let's all pitch in to clean up this mess from Nikiski to Soldotna, Seward to Homer and restore the Peninsula to a place of pride.
Carroll ( Madden) Knutson

shadowmt
78
Points
shadowmt 01/08/13 - 09:35 am
2
2

bs

Just who does this Fred Miller think he is? Just because a lot of people have old non running vehicles on their property DOES NOT MEAN THEY ARE LIVING IN ABSOLUTE FILTH. How did someone like this ever become Council President for Nikiski? Better wake up other council members he will be looking in your backyard next.Time to send him back to where he came from before he gets more power. I'll bet the last time his car or truck needed serviced or a new part he ran to mechanics shop and paid to have the work done.

bigtalkahh
184
Points
bigtalkahh 01/08/13 - 03:04 pm
2
1

Lined Landfill

Old cars cause minor pollution. I don't know where Mr Wright got his info on our lined landfill but I know for a fact that he is way off base. Our "biodigestion" lined landfill is an experiment. That's right, check it out. EPA granted approval to see if this kind of technology would work at this latitude. Building it had absolutely nothing to do with parked junk cars. Steve, where did you ever come up with that?

spwright
1376
Points
spwright 01/08/13 - 03:28 pm
3
2

From the Residents

I was informed of this Drinking Water Pollution by a Resident
of the Arc Loop Neighborhood directly South of the Peninsula Land Fill on Sterling Highway.
Their wells & drinking water had been contamined by toxic waste from the land fill making their homes & property worthless.Turned that neighborhood into a Ghost Town.
No one could sell, no one would buy a Home there.

Kinda like when your neighbor decides to have Mountians of RUSTY OLE JUNKERS. That makes Your Property Worthless. Who wants to live next to a Junk Yard ?

SPW

Sam Von Pufendorf
1088
Points
Sam Von Pufendorf 01/08/13 - 05:04 pm
2
2

Pollutants from abandoned automobiles

Lead, sulfuric acid, mercury, asbestos, petroleum based lubricants, gasoline, glycol just to name a few.

cbeard
132
Points
cbeard 01/10/13 - 10:46 am
1
2

Wait on it.

Cleaning up Nikiski is a nice thought but they would just mess it up all over again. Let the old fogeys live out there lives in their junkyards and then clean it out when the population dips to 0.

Obfuscate
226
Points
Obfuscate 01/10/13 - 12:10 pm
2
1

Thanks!

Thank you! - To the two individuals that took the time to warn the community of the deceitful practice that Mr. Schwartz used during the creation of this article. It is nice to know when someone can not be trusted.

Dan Schwartz - You should be ashamed of yourself.

Peninsula Clarion - If you knew about this, you should be ashamed as well. If you did not, at least you know now and can do a better job policing your employees.

Watchman on the Wall
2893
Points
Watchman on the Wall 01/10/13 - 12:35 pm
1
2

NOW, NOW!!

Lets not be to rash with reporters who create or twist facts or leave many out in their indevor to create or push their view points, along with continual deletions of posts against their slanted one sided views, shall we?
It certainly does appear that N.Kenai has created a fire storm of contempt in the very young media staff at the clarion does it not? This of course does make others wonder what the End Game really is concerning stories like these, and if it has to do with GREEN PLANET BELIEFS by many in their push to save the world, with people like Al Gore leading the way?

jlmh
293
Points
jlmh 01/10/13 - 01:59 pm
1
2

That's how reporting works

When reporters write a story, it's for their readers; not to please their sources. They interview different people to get different perspectives, so hopefully we know where everyone is coming from on an issue. That doesn't obligate them to cater to those people. That doesn't mean their article has to agree with the sources, or even be the kind of story that those sources would have wanted to read. This reporter obviously wanted to do a piece about junk cars on the peninsula. That's a perfectly legitimate issue to write about, and he did just that. Interviewing a popular "junk car" collector was a crucial part of the reporting process. If he didn't do it, people would complain that he didn't connect with anyone on the "other side" of the debate. But he did. Now we know McGahan's views. If you want to read a story about vintage car restoration and racing, then write it yourself, or suggest it to the staff. Just because McGahan acquiesced to an interview doesn't mean he gets to tell Schwartz what to write.

Watchman on the Wall
2893
Points
Watchman on the Wall 01/10/13 - 03:14 pm
1
2

Many other areas around the Kenai

There are areas on KBeach road that used to have massive amounts of old cars, There are places in Sterling that still do have old cars along with septic desposal sites like at the beginning of the Native land on Swanson River road along the transmission power line septic waste site, the old gas station thats closed down in sterling next to the Moose river camp ground. Then there is Funny river road as well with it's waste sites or old auto stock piles. Many places abound with junk or waste stations for many things, not just N.Kenai.
I agree reporters can and do write on things THEY DEEM as reportable subject matters. The thing is, it does appear that N. Kenai is being singled out and for what purpose? What say these reporters go after BIG OIL OR GAS or OTHER business that do the very same acts as are reported on like N. Kenai?
I don't live in N.Kenai, but as a 36 yr resident of the Kenai i do realize that there are major issues out there with chemical waste which have filltered down into the ground waters, as well as Toxic air polutions from the refineries out there. The thing is it's EVERY WHERE on the Kenai and Alaska, not just N.Kenai. Yes it needs to be stopped, but, it will never be cleaned up, never no matter who is blamed now or news articles written about.
Old wrecking yard at corner of Gaswell & KBeach. Old wrecking yard on KBeach out by the Marithon Oil plant just passed the old Kenner fish plant. Present wrecking yard on KBeach by Outlaw Body. Very old still functioning wrecking yard off Adkins road, also a septic waste site out there. An old septic waste site behind the gravel pit in Ridgeway. It's everywhere. The old DOT site in Soldotna, The land fill and vacated homes around it. The land surrounding the Clarion all contaminated by oil industry past. The land all around Wildwood, the old military base. Then there is the toxic waste that falls out of the air stream which flows from Japan, China, Russia which falls on the Kenai. The list could go on for ever with just the few sites i mentioned as well as many others.
Why do you think we have so much cancer or other illnesses here on the Kenai with animals also growing extra legs of birds with deformed bills? It's not due to non existant false claims of evolution all these deformities & illnesses.
I guess i have said way to much so i'll stop with this last comment, it's not just in N.Kenai, it's every where and it can't be fixed no matter who we blame or how much fake clean up is performed wasting massive amounts of time and money, along with hurting other people and trying to ruin their lives.
Please keep all this INFO confidential, as i have alread told you more than i know.

Obfuscate
226
Points
Obfuscate 01/11/13 - 12:58 pm
3
1

Missing the point?

jlmh – Maybe you are missing the point? Or maybe you don’t mind people acting dishonestly?

If the reporter wanted to do a piece on junk cars then he should have told Mr. McGahan ‘I am doing a piece on junk cars in Nikiski – can I interview you for this story’. It appears not to have been done this way and it appears the reporter used deceit to elicit comments from a source.

Just because this is the way that reporting currently works does not make it the proper and honorable way to work.

I believe that anyone using deceit to get what they want should be ashamed of themselves and if you believe that using deceit is acceptable then you should be ashamed of yourself as well.

jlmh
293
Points
jlmh 01/11/13 - 11:50 pm
2
0

Quite an accusation

I very much doubt that Schwarz approached McGahan claiming to do a feature on him. More likely, the reporter said he was doing an article and asked him a few questions. Then, as hobbyists often do, he found himself in a lively discussion with an eager listener and made his own assumptions about where the article was going. The fact that he ended up disappointed doesn't mean he was intentionally deceived.

I disagree that reporters should fully indulge the intent of their interviews with their sources. Then they'd only ever get information from people who had something to gain from the article. Or they'd have a chance to manipulate the interview. And what about reporters who, after a series of interviews, decide to go a different route with the article, or even take a different position? Must they then go back and get their sources' permission to write something else? I think not. As long as no one was misquoted and the information was factual, I say it's good reporting.

Watchman on the Wall
2893
Points
Watchman on the Wall 01/11/13 - 08:40 pm
1
2

jlmh

Do you think that the reporting of every gun permit holder in NY by the Journal news was a good job of reporting as well, or was it a personal job of promoting an agenda?
Do you reallty think this is about junk cars or another article about N.Kenai and the bad old timers who settled there in the form of McGahans or Arness'sand what big oil did to the community on lands owned by these families?
I have witnessed the continual reporting of this VERY YOUNG left slanted news team before much like this article supposedly ment to share and INFORM the community in an article about the Feasts of God for jews & christians alike this past yr on the Feast of Rosh Hashanah. An article that was supposed to be all about the 7 Feasts of God found in the book of Leviticus 23;, all the Feasts are foreshadows or looking ahead to what Yeshua would do, fulfill at his first and second coming in accordance with Gods plan of redemption for all of mankind. It was supposed to be a UNITING article of Christians and Jews who celebrate these Feasts of God. Was it? Did it? Thats a BIG NO, IT DID NOT.
Please allow me to say that the Clarion does do gr8 articles about the Kenai as well as other things stories. But, i do wonder if this Young group of reporters are actually left leaners or just forced to report with a left slant on ALL stories they do report on by the far left syndicate news that now owns almost every news agency in America and world wide.
Not trying to PO anyone here, just wondering about many of the articles and the continual deletion of comments, or closing of articles for comments when they are challanged with factual truths that conflict with their reports, articles. Why is this done because of comments which point these actions out of left leaning stories which seem to be nonstop and almost made up then when challanged they shut all comments down and move on. As i showed before if they want to do a story about polutants on the Kenai, then check out all the areas i mentioned as well as many more rather than the continuial hammering of N.Kenai folks. Ever heard of FAIR & BALANCED Reporting? It means to be Fair & Balanced with all sides put forth, not just slanted views or ideals. I say someone has an agenda, either the Clarion or possibly the person that sicked the Clarion on the N.Kenai residents of Old.
I better stop before i get booted off here again for the last time for sharing way to much Unacceptable INFO and TRUTH.

radiokenai
556
Points
radiokenai 01/19/13 - 03:21 pm
0
0

Simple as this....

Unpublished

Who owns the Land?

Richard and Dale are both very good people and the Mr. Clarion should be ashamed at this article, but then we are all use to deception from the Liberal Clarion...it is how Liberals operate...by deception. No big surprise there!

Yet every so often, Mr. Clarion gets more than he bargained for! Mr. Clarion tries to throw eggs in the face of good people and winds up smelling of rotten eggs themselves.

Mr. Clarion, a lot of people know and respect Rich and Dale and see right through your load of reporting crap.

And you know what? Citizens of the North Road enjoy their right to privacy. We could care freaking less about what the idiots that live on Echo Lake think (like spwright ...wow....what a real crown jewel you people have as a neighbor there!).

I bet SPWrong doesn't know the difference between a crow wrench and a monkey bar? You'll have to think on that one for a week or two! haha!

So, to Dale and Richard and all of us others who have junkers on our property, remember it is OUR property and NOT theirs! We don't throw away our rights with covenants or treaties as you brain dead city folk do.

We like the old saying "Mind your own business and keep out of ours!"

radiokenai
556
Points
radiokenai 01/20/13 - 09:15 am
1
0

To Watchman!

Unpublished

Very Correct! You said a key thing here: It is obvious that the Clarion has kids just out of High School Journalism Class as their Professional Reporters. They have NO clue about life outside X-Box or I-Phones. I put very little faith in their reporting, because...

They are simply inexperienced...

If I told you to listen to the opinion of a 18 year old obama loving know it all, who was standing right in front of you with pants hanging down their backside, wearing blue spiked hair and sporting a nose ring...would you put a whole lot of faith in their opinion?

Didn't think so...neither would I...

Well that is exactly who is writing the stories you read in the clarion....

Someone should interview the reporters and do story on them! Bet they wouldn't like it one bit eh?

MeO
29
Points
MeO 01/20/13 - 03:21 pm
0
1

Nikiski - Then and Now

When I came to Nikiski 38 years ago it was because the people that lived out here did not want the rules and regulations that Kenai and Soldotna had and still have due to people wanting things to be just like they were in California where Fred Miller came from. If you are like Fred has always been - and want things your way only - go back where you came from - that is if you did not burn all the bridges down before you left.

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