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Fairbanks man to serve on Board of Fish

Posted: February 7, 2013 - 9:27pm  |  Updated: February 8, 2013 - 9:12am

The newest appointee to the Board of Fisheries wants people to see more than a sportfishing guide when they consider him for the board.

Reed Morisky, of Fairbanks, was Gov. Sean Parnell’s pick for the recently vacated seat and although his appointment is subject to confirmation by the Alaska Legislature, the guide said he was excited to begin the process.

“I’ve followed fisheries for years and years and years and I’ve been a sportfishing guide for years and I have family in commercial fishing,” Morisky said. “I believe that my attitude and respect toward all users will be a benefit.”

If confirmed, Morisky will replace Bill Brown, of Juneau, who announced his departure with more than a year left in his term.

Morisky’s term would expire June 30, 2014.

Morisky is a sportfishing guide who owns Wilderness Fishing based out of Fairbanks and Nenana. He has been in the state since 1981, he said.

“I’ve lived up here since then and I guide on the North side of Denali Park in several drainages of the Tanana system, he said.

Primarily, he guides for grayling and three species of salmon and said he advocates for a sustainable fishery.

Morisky currently works for the University of Alaska Fairbanks and according to a media release is a member of the Fairbanks Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, Trout Unlimited, Alaska Outdoor Council and the National Rifle Association.

While he does guide primarily, Morisky said he was not willing to “brand” himself as a voice for guides on the Board of Fish.

“I put in for this board seat so that I could help bring a collaborative atmosphere to the board,” he said.

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Unglued
222
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Unglued 02/08/13 - 09:46 am
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Another fishing guide

It will be interesting to see how long it takes Kenai River Sportfishing and the Kenai River Guides Association to get this guide in line with their way of thinking, which apparently is to squeeze the last possible dollar out of every fishery. That he is also a "sport" fisherman doesn't help if he makes a living at it. When a decision has to be made between the buck and anything else, the money wins every time.

Redbrdee
401
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Redbrdee 02/12/13 - 04:05 pm
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A Fairbanks Guide?

Really? When will the thousands of drift gillnetters and seiners be properly represented on the Board of Fish? We make a huge economic contribution to southeast Alaska, Bristol Bay, Alaska Peninsula, Cook Inlet, Kodiak and Prince William Sound and we are regulated by guys like this. It doesn't make any sense. Will he vote to constrain the Department of Fish and Game's biologists emergency order authority rendering their actions political rather than biological and scientifically based? One can only assume.......

Unglued
222
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Unglued 02/12/13 - 05:46 pm
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A different shade of ugly

For several years now, the fish board members have been pretty much equally divided between user-groups commonly referred to as "sport" and "commercial." At a glance, this is about as healthy a mix as is possible. But a closer look reveals that a user-group that would accurately be called "commercial users" has dominated the board and the regulation-making process for some time. This group includes anyone making a buck from either sport or commercial fishing, pretty much anyone in business in Alaska. The entire process is now controlled not by what's best for the fisheries, but what's best for the almighty dollar. Economics runs management, not science.

Economics has always been a key factor in Alaska's fisheries management, but the emergence of the sport-fishing industry as an economic force has painted things an entirely different shade of ugly.

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