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Wave of baitfish makes for hot saltwater King action

Posted: May 22, 2013 - 7:35pm

A massive influx of baitfish in the marine waters of Cook Inlet has lured king salmon to the southern Kenai Peninsula’s near shore fisheries much to the delight of fishermen and charter fishing guides.

Robert Begich, biologist with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, said the marine troll fishery has been hot the last few days for both kings waiting to enter the river and the usual feeder king populations.

The lower Kenai River is also, for the first time in several years, seeing a good run of hooligan, Begich said.

“When there is a lot of hooligan and bait fish on shore, it pulls in a lot of kings, feeders included,” he said. “The fishing tends to be better yet still.”

Early run king fishing on the Kenai River has been slow, although it’s very early in the season and only a handful of anglers have braved the weather, Begich said.

“We’ve been getting a couple of interviews a day, but nobody is having any luck,” he said. “I guess it’s like Horace Greeley said a long time ago on the western frontier. I’ll just say, ‘Go south, young man.’ That’s where it’s happening.”

Fishermen are encouraged to double-check the status of their sportfishing license and the regulations book before heading out fishing. Current rules are in place for no-bait trophy king salmon fishing on the Kenai River.

Currently, Fish and Game emergency orders prohibit:

■ The retention of kings greater than 20 inches and less than 55 inches throughout the Kenai River, and the Moose River from its confluence with the Kenai to the Sterling Highway bridge.

■ Use of bait. Fishermen must use one, unbaited, single hook artificial lure.

On July 1, fishing will open to bait and retention of kings from Slikok Creek downstream to the mouth of the river. The rest of the river from the outlet of Skilak Lake down will open for bait fishing on July 15. Fish that are not legal to keep may not be removed from the water and must be released immediately.

Based on its preseason outlook, Fish and Game reported that this year’s Kenai River early-run of king salmon is expected to be very low.

In the Kasilof, anglers are not allowed to keep naturally-produced king salmon. The bag and possession limit for hatchery fish, identifiable by a clipped adipose fin, is one greater than 20 inches in length through June 30.

The Russian River, the upper Kenai River — from Skilak Lake to Kenai Lake — and the river from the outlet of Skilak Lake to the Upper Killey River are closed to all fishing through June 10 for the rainbow trout spawning season. The upper river and Russian sections will open on June 11 to trout and salmon fly fishing only.

Between Skilak and Killey will also open on June 11, but is not a fly fishing only water.

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Suss
3894
Points
Suss 05/23/13 - 11:15 am
0
0
Wrong Info ON BAIT & RETENTION

Bait is not allowed on the Kenai after July 1st, please check ADFG E/O AND CORRECT.

http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=fishingSportFishingInfo.NR&NRI...

From 12:01 a.m., Monday, July 1, through 11:59 p.m., Sunday, July 14, 2013:
•In the Kenai River drainage from ADF&G regulatory markers located approximately 300 yards downstream from the mouth of Slikok Creek, upstream to the outlet of Skilak Lake, and in the Moose River from its confluence with the Kenai River upstream to the northernmost edge of the Sterling Highway bridge, king salmon 20 inches or greater in length and less than 55 inches in length may not be possessed or retained, may not be removed from the water and must be released immediately. Harvest of king salmon less than 20 inches in length or 55 inches or greater in length is still allowed.
•Use of bait is not allowed in the Kenai River drainage from ADF&G regulatory markers located approximately 300 yards downstream from the mouth of Slikok Creek, upstream to the outlet of Skilak Lake, and in the Moose River from its confluence with the Kenai River upstream to the northernmost edge of the Sterling Highway bridge.

kenai123
1312
Points
kenai123 05/23/13 - 01:52 pm
1
1
Begich is wrong to encourage an inter-sport fish re-allocation.

It is completely improper for Begich to be encouraging sport anglers to travel to a new and distant location to acquire their Kenai River king salmon. That kind of action is what is know to be an (inter-sport fish re-allocation of a fishery) and is totally illegal. 5 AAC 75.003. Emergency Order Authority, offers authority to create a catch and release sport fishery on the Kenai River unless that C & R fishery changes the allocation of harvest among other users. The Kenai River king fishery is currently shut-down but those stocks have been re-allocate to other sport fish users, thus voiding the possible 5 AAC 75.003 authority for the C & R, Emergency Order No 2- KS-1-11-13.

Under 5 AAC 39.223, (c) (1), the ADF&G and BOF are tasked to take regulatory actions as may be necessary to address allocation issues arising from the implementation of a new or modified BEG, SEG, and SET. It is very clear that an allocation issue has developed from the implementation of
Emergency Order No 2- KS-1-11-13. That issue regards our Kenai River kings being intercepted within the saltwater south of the Kenai River by everyone but me. This is a re-allocation of the Kenai River early run king salmon sport fishery.

If you can't believe me then read the below link to the False Pass case, Peninsula Marketing Assoc. et al v. Dept. of Fish and Game (9/20/91), 817 P 2d 917, which defines an inter-commercial fishery re-allocation as being as improper as a inter-user group re-allocaton.

"There is no basis for distinguishing allocations among commercial fisheries from allocations between different types of fisheries. Commercial fishers in Fishery A would suffer the same loss if the board reallocated certain fish resources to commercial Fishery B that they would suffer if the board reallocated the fish to sport fishers in Fishery A. Indeed, this court has specifically rejected a distinction between commercial-sport and commercial- commercial allocations. Meier v. State, Board of Fisheries, 739 P.2d 172, 174 (Alaska 1987)."
http://www.touchngo.com/lglcntr/akstats/statutes/title16/chapter05/secti...

MaxPen
2
Points
MaxPen 05/31/13 - 09:43 am
0
0
Suss...read the article again please

You posted the same information written in the article. Please re-read.

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