Current weather

  • Clear sky
  • 54°
    Clear sky
  • Comment

Fish and Game discusses salmon research, Cook Inlet management with Mat-Su commission

Posted: May 23, 2013 - 8:48pm

Cook Inlet salmon research and management was at the heart of a meeting in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough last week.

The borough’s Fish and Wildlife Commission met with Alaska Department of Fish and Game officials and other interested parties to discuss plans for future research, and what that could mean for fisheries management in Cook Inlet, May 15.

ADFG and the borough received a combined $7 million from the legislature for various fisheries projects, although that is still subject to Gov. Sean Parnell’s approval. Parnell had proposed spending money on statewide fisheries research, but whether or not he will approve the legislature’s plan, which sends more money specifically to research in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough, has yet to be seen.

The legislature’s capital budget for fiscal year 2014, which starts July 1, includes $4.5 million for ADFG to do research related to Northern District and Susitna drainage salmon, and $2.5 for the Matanuska-Susitna Borough to do research and habitat protection work. The plans also include some enhancement projects.

Sockeye, coho, chum, pink and king salmon could all be studied in the proposed plans.

ADFG’s Legislative Liason Ben Mulligan said the department wanted to work with the borough so that both pools of money could be used as effectively as possible. The research plans are not finalized yet, pending budget approval and collaboration between the borough and the state.

ADFG’s proposed work includes enumerating and tagging fish in freshwater streams and rivers, habitat work to mitigate beaver dams and eradicate pike and developing a genetic baseline as the first step toward understanding salmon migration.

Mulligan said that some work could begin in the latter part of the summer and into the fall, although other funded projects would take place next summer, due to the timing of salmon runs.

ADFG representatives also talked about some ideas for enhancement, which could boost populations in certain streams in the short-term.

The goal is to better understand what’s happening with Northern District salmon, both in Cook Inlet and when they get to fresh water.

Eventually, a better understanding could translate into management that helps fishermen prosecute the fishery more selectively.

Board of Fisheries member Tom Kluberton, who co-chaired the Upper Cook Inlet task force with former member Vince Webster, asked ADFG if the research proposed could eventually provide enough information for the board to manage Cook Inlet commercial fishermen in a targeted fashion more similar to Bristol Bay. He said he’d be responsive to such a move at a future Board of Fisheries meeting.

Kluberton is a Talkeetna, and Mat-Su borough, resident who serves on the statewide fisheries body.

The commission is also looking for a change in Cook Inlet management regimes.

After the meeting, Mat-Su borough assembly member Jim Colver talked about his thoughts on those changes.

“We’ve gotta be a little more strategic and surgical about how we harvest fish,” Colver said, emphasizing that he thought any plans should preserve both commercial and sport harvests.

Before management can change, Colver said more research is needed, including a better understand of the stream of origin for salmon caught in the lower and middle Cook Inlet.

“It’s all going to come back to sound science,” Colver said.

Paul Shadura from the Kenai Peninsula Fishermen’s Association said that while surgical openings can provide some benefits, there are other concerns for Cook Inlet fishermen if the management regime changes.

Right now, east side setnetters harvest primarily Kenai and Kasilof river salmon, but the drift fleet catches about 15 percent of “other” salmon, some of which are bound for the Northern District. If the drift fleet was managed in tighter corridors, or closer to the beach, to harvest the Kenai and Kasilof fish, the proportions in the fishery would change, and it might be difficult to allow both user groups their historical harvest, Shadura said.

Setnetters do see some benefits to more precise management. Shadura said that targeted openings along the beach could allow harvest by some users when others needed to stand down, and some fishing opportunity that still protected kings would be an asset. That’s an idea the fleet was supported, and even asked for, in the past.

Shadura did not attend the meeting, but had received some information about the discussions and could comment on some of the ideas and research presented.

Although ADFG and the borough’s collaborative research mostly will not get started until next summer, the Department also has some new work planned for this summer.

Most of the new work is being funded by the Alaska Energy Authority’s studies as part of the Susitna-Watana hydro project.

The AEA-funded work includes king salmon studies on the Susitna River and tributaries.

ADFG’s Bob Clark said the Susitna weir is getting moved this year, and the department will also be installing four additional weirs — those will be on Lake Creek, Montana Creek, Talachulitna and the Chulitna.

The weirs will help enumerate kings.

A study with radio tags will also help better understand Susitna River salmon by seeing where the fish go to spawn. In the future, the department can use that info to do genetic mark and recapture work. Ultimately, ADFG would like to know what the different migration patterns in Cook Inlet are for various Northern District stocks.

Fish and Wildlife Commission members were receptive to many of those ideas.

Larry Engel, a former Board of Fisheries member on the commission, said he thought the department’s plans were really positive.

Howard Delo, a member of the Mat-Su commission, also talked about the need for longer-term funding for ADFG’s work. The projects, he said, sounded like steps toward needed information. But more than one or two years worth of research is needed.

“We really don’t want to see it go away just cause the capital budget was funded one year,” he said.

Colver said radio tagging was a good start toward figuring where species go at certain times.

Beyond research and management ideals, participants said the meeting represented a step toward fishermen from different sectors working together.

Arni Thomson said the Kenai-based Alaska Salmon Alliance supports much of the proposed habitat work, the enhancement projects and the genetics studies.

He said he appreciated Colver’s focus on working together, both between fishing sectors and regions.

“I thought the meeting went really well,” Thomson said.

Commercial fishermen and sport fishermen both play a role in local economies, and need access to fish, Colver said. Cook Inlet fisheries need to transition from allocative fish wars to science-based decision-making, Colver said.

“Who can yell the loudest, that’s not moving the ball forward,” Colver said.

Rather than developing a user group to work on future research and management plans, Colver said he thought ADFG needs to take the lead.

If the department is committed to science, the Board of Fisheries can make any decisions, he said. But it’s really incumbent on the department to do the science and come up with management solutions.

“They’re the experts,” Colver said.

Thomson said his biggest hope is that sport and commercial fishermen from the Mat-Su and Kenai Peninsula boroughs will be able to approach the Cook Inlet board of fisheries meetings next year with a unified approach.

The Mat-Su commission is slated to meet again with ADFG to hash out the research plans.

Molly Dischner can be reached at molly.dischner@alaskajournal.com.

  • Comment

Comments (1) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
kenai123
1268
Points
kenai123 05/24/13 - 03:19 pm
0
0
more strategic and surgical about how we harvest fish?

"'We’ve gotta be a little more strategic and surgical about how we harvest fish,” Colver said, emphasizing that he thought any plans should preserve both commercial and sport harvests."

Surgical harvest? ADF&G has already admitted the main problem with our kings is in the salt water, out beyond Cook Inlet, so why is Colver only focused on Cook Inlet and the freshwater harvest? Same old story, a total refusal to admit that our ADF&G has mis-managed our fisheries. We may have many allocation problems here in Cook Inlet but trying to fix a Gulf of Alaska marine problem with surgical Cook Inlet harvest is like attempting to use surgery to remove a problem which is through-out the body. Colver needs to start seeing the forest in stead of the single Cook Inlet tree he has his nose pressed up against.

"Setnetters do see some benefits to more precise management. Shadura said that targeted openings along the beach could allow harvest by some users when others needed to stand down, and some fishing opportunity that still protected kings would be an asset. That’s an idea the fleet was supported, and even asked for, in the past."

In the past Shadura would never even discuss only opening (some set netters). They didn't even want people to know the king numbers in specific nets. Now we can suddenly do "precise management"? Why couldn't we do that precise management for the past 30 years? Answer, commercial set netters do not care about our king salmon, only that they can fish and make $$. Because they could not fish in 2012, they now suddenly "see the light" of precision management? If these set netters would have agreed to this precision management years ago a great many kings would still be alive today and they would have been able to fish in 2012. It is painfully obvious that set netters are more interested in making $$ than precision fisheries management. What will be the position change tomorrow if set nets cannot fish again in 2013 because of 30 years worth of non-precise fisheries management? We are not dealing with a light switch here set netters. The problem is a marine environment which takes decades to spool up or down with good or
bad fisheries management. You have helped to spool the system down for decades and now you wish to go the other direction? Well good luck with that, we will see you-all in a couple decades and see what you got to say then.

"A study with radio tags will also help better understand Susitna River salmon by seeing where the fish go to spawn. In the future, the department can use that info to do genetic mark and recapture work. Ultimately, ADFG would like to know what the different migration patterns in Cook Inlet are for various Northern District stocks."

So while we are busy spending money chasing and tagging salmon around in the fresh water, any gains we make there will be forced to attempt to survive a salt water environment which is user hostile to salmon? You could build a thousand hatchery's and plant billions of salmon but if the Gulf of Alaska is going to just kill them, what was it all for? Our ocean is at a 50 year nitrogen low because we under-escaped all of our rivers and streams for the past 30 years. Our pollock trawlers are by-catching killing and dumping anything which happens to survive. So we are supposed tag fish and follow behind them in the fresh water to see where they go? It does not matter where they go because if they happen to survive their off-spring will be destroyed within the Gulf of Alaska.

'"If the department is committed to science, the Board of Fisheries can make any decisions, he said. But it’s really incumbent on the department to do the science and come up with management solutions. “They’re the experts,” Colver said."

The department has had a thirty years shot managing these fish and we are now in worst shape than when they started: so what does that tell you? It tells you that you can say that you are "committed to science" and still destroy your world with a basic lack of common sense. I don't know how others think on this but if a guys been trying to sharpen a knife for thirty years and the knife is duller today than when he started, I say its time to let someone else have a shot at it.

Back to Top

Spotted

Please Note: You may have disabled JavaScript and/or CSS. Although this news content will be accessible, certain functionality is unavailable.

Skip to News

« back

next »

  • title http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/321268/ http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/321253/ http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/321248/
  • title http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/321243/ http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/321208/ http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/320593/
  • title http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/321173/ http://spotted.peninsulaclarion.com/galleries/321163/
My Gallery

CONTACT US

  • 150 Trading Bay Rd, Kenai, AK 99611
  • Switchboard: 907-283-7551
  • Circulation and Delivery: 907-283-3584
  • Newsroom Fax: 907-283-3299
  • Business Fax: 907-283-3299
  • Accounts Receivable: 907-335-1257
  • View the Staff Directory
  • or Send feedback

ADVERTISING

SUBSCRIBER SERVICES

SOCIAL NETWORKING

MORRIS ALASKA NEWS