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Kasilof nets hit the water

Posted: June 27, 2013 - 7:52pm  |  Updated: January 24, 2014 - 5:31pm
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The first opening of the Kasilof Section setnet fishery on the East side of the Cook Inlet  started Thursday at 7 a.m. Fishermen on more than 30 miles of ....   Rashah McChesney
Rashah McChesney
The first opening of the Kasilof Section setnet fishery on the East side of the Cook Inlet started Thursday at 7 a.m. Fishermen on more than 30 miles of ....

Editor's Note: This story has been edited to correct a spelling error. 

Aaron Kaas pulled the first sockeye of the season out of a beach net on his family’s setnet sites near Clam Gulch.

It took several tries as the 11-year-old grimaced, pulled, unwrapped the net and rewrapped it in the opposite direction even dropping the flopping fish once to run from a wave that washed over his knees, threatening to pull him under; but finally it popped free and he carried it up the beach to his older cousins and a waiting fish tote.

“It’s the first fish of the season,” said Megan Smith. “Are you going to kiss it?”

Caleigh Jensen, 14, reached into the white tote pulled the fish up to her face and kissed it, much to the delight of Kaas who grinned up at her the whole time.

Her mouth contorted as she made a face and wiped away the slime.

The “first fish tradition” it turns out, is something of a joke at the Smith setnet sites, Megan said later as she laughed about the whole scenario.

“We like to mess with the kids and keep it fun,” she said. “Everybody is grumpy and everybody is tired, because usually no one sleeps well the first night.”

Thursday morning at 7 a.m. marked the opening of the first fishing period of the season for Kasilof Section setnetters on the East side of the Cook Inlet and while several people had the typical first-day problems, the mood was cheerful up and down the beach as early morning clouds gave way to a sunny afternoon and the midafternoon news that the Alaska Department of Fish and Game had announced a two-hour extension of their period.

After the beach nets were picked, Smith took the family’s first load of fish a few miles south on the Sterling Highway to Doug Blossom’s Icicle Seafood receiving station. She took in 270 sockeye salmon.

“That’s not bad for a first pick,” she said.

At the nets directly south of the Smith’s sites, Scott Ruttum’s family had a harder time getting going.

They’re in the their fourth season and managed to get eight out of their nine nets out, but it took a while.

“I got two sets, set no problem and on my third set the web snagged my gas line and ripped it right out of my boat,” he said. “So we had to pull that back into the boat, flag my son down and they had one set by then cause they — I don’t know what their problem was — so then we got seven out of eight set but we missed a lot of fish. Didn’t get my beach net set until the water was almost set.”

Still, with the two extra hours, Ruttum said he could leave his outer nets out and pick them at a slack tide instead of pulling them early to make sure he was out of the water by 7 p.m.

“It’s much safer and easier to deal with,” he said. “I was very happy to hear that because I would have been down to five nets for the flood and then we would have to start pulling early and it would be real difficult.”

Further south, Brent Johnson’s sites were bustling by midday as well.

Johnson said he was tired.

“We’re short on crew and we were up last night doing stuff, bringing down nets and stacking them on the beach,” Johnson said.

He’s had trouble replenishing crew after last year’s disastrous season but said he’ll be looking to pick a few more people up.

“It’s looking to be a very good sockeye year,” he said.

As of 11 a.m. Pat Shields said there were close to 110,000 sockeye in the Kasilof River, just shy of the lower end of the river’s minimum escapement goal.

Despite the high numbers and the encouraging start to the fishing season, Smith said she was still cautiously optimistic about the upcoming season.

“I don’t want to take anything for granted, I want to enjoy every moment with my kids and my crew and fishing because you don’t know if it’s going to be there the next tide,” she said.

 

Rashah McChesney can be reached at rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com

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kenai123
1305
Points
kenai123 06/30/13 - 12:28 pm
1
5
What about our minimum king escapement goals?

Pat Shields says he's, just shy of the lower end of the river’s sockeye minimum escapement goal? What about our minimum king escapement goals for the Kasilof and Kenai Rivers Pat? Why aren't we hearing you express your concern for us being able to reach our king goals? Why are you hammering Cook Inlet with non-selective gill nets and killing kings while all public harvest is banned in those same waters?

It may make a great STORY telling about a little 11-year-old kid catching the first sockeye but what about the STORY about the KILLER gear type used to catch that first sockeye? What about the STORY about the first king that died in the lethal gill nets to allow that kid to catch that first sockeye? I guess they forgot about that first king. Off it vanishes to the cannery, never to be written about or missed.
Meanwhile all Cook Inlet is closed to public king fishing. Meanwhile Cook Inlet is open to private commercial king gill netting

Our ADF&G is so controlled by commercial fisheries profits that they are willing to destroy one fish in order to allow commercial fisheries to profit by harvesting another fish. It is completely illogical to close down all Cook Inlet to public king fishing because of a lack of kings and then open those same waters to a commercial gill net slaughter. Gill nets are non-selective, they kill EVERYTHING in the water. Our ADF&G has zero creditability on this as they attempt to speak out of both sides of their mouth at the same time. Either we have a monster king problem and EVERYONE should be closed down or the ADF&G has no idea what it is doing regarding our king stocks. There isn't a third choice ADF&G. In what reality can you get away with declaring a fisheries disaster and then keep hammering away at the disaster with gill nets? That is what our federal fisheries managers did back in 1959 when they totally destroyed our salmon stocks. Is this what the ADF&G is after? Total king stock collapse statewide?

It is really great that we have some sockeye salmon but how can our ADF&G justify catching them with a killer gear type which is hammering kings while the ADF&G is supposed to be trying to conserve them?

Beach Boss
124
Points
Beach Boss 06/30/13 - 01:59 pm
6
1
Give it a REST

Kenai123 I'm so sick and tired of reading your hatred for commercial fisherman. You think Adf&g should allow 900,000 sockeye to go up the Kasilof river? This is a mixed stock fishery and its a fine balancing act. Essn will take a very small portion 8% of 30" larger kenai river late run king salmon, and starting tomorrow the in river user gets a shot at harvesting the rest (without bait will take 12% and if they add bait back will harvest 22% of run). So get over it!!! Nice article!!

borninak
609
Points
borninak 06/30/13 - 04:17 pm
4
1
K123 Can't Sleep

So Kenai123 Hates Alaska Fish & Game personnel because he is so much smarter than the educated professional Biologists, hates gillnetters because they SELECTIVELY harvest sockeye salmon, hates the concept of commerical so I guess he hates himself, hates greedy setnetters because he is greedy himself and doesn't get to kill all the King Salmon, and basically can't sleep at night. Must be that time of year.

smithtb
240
Points
smithtb 06/30/13 - 09:14 pm
6
1
ELEPHANT in the ROOM

"Off it vanishes to the cannery, never to be written about or missed."

123, you COULDN'T be more WRONG. These fish are recorded on fish tickets, and harvest data was publicly available to you the day after the opener. The few kings that were caught were sampled by ADFG, and genetics were fast -tracked to give managers an in-depth look of the harvest. How many other fisheries produce this much data? Was genetic data taken from the thousands of kings that have been sport harvested from Homer to Talkeetna this year? Ha! We don't even know how many have been caught!

Unlike the Kings caught inriver, NONE of those caught during this ESSN opener were counted as escapement.

Low abundance is not a monster King problem. Stop ignoring the Elephant in the room which is while all UCI King stocks are down right now, the only one that is darn near failure is the Kenai Early Run which INRIVER COMMERCIAL FISHERMEN like yourself helped fish to near extinction. Stop blaming everyone else for a problem you had a hand in creating.

Oh, and hey DON JOHNSON, how about you have some class and stop calling people out by name. You've done it to Mr. Shields before, and it's not cool.

pengy
250
Points
pengy 07/01/13 - 12:12 pm
1
0
smithb, I know by all your

smithb,

I know by all your posts you're very educated on fish issues. What I don't get is your finger pointing of the ER in river users for the reason why the stocks are so low. Don't you think conditions in the ocean are causing this (and perhaps incidental bycatch of juvenile king salmon by commercial fisherman in the Gulf and Bering Sea)? The fact that an enhanced fishery like Ship Creek has been closed the past two years is all the proof you'll need to know that there's problems in the ocean. Can you blame an enhanced fishery that's crashed on guides, catch and release mortality, habitat destruction, overharvesting, etc? If the Kenai was the only river in the state having problems with their king return I would be on board and blame the in river users but guess what, it's happening nearly everywhere in the state....

Seafarer
1147
Points
Seafarer 07/01/13 - 01:39 pm
2
1
Kenai123: Be a Big Boy and Share!

You are truely ignorant of Commercial Salmon Fishing. All you do is repeat your rants over and over! I quite imagine you got your talking points from the KRSA? Either way, please avail yourself of literature or websites for Comm. Fishing. It is a family tradition for many folks and apparently, you wouldn't care if they feed their children or not. As long as you get your fish that feeds only you and yours. We feed the world. What have you got against that? Are you a patriot, or just another greedy riverhead all about you, you, you.

Get a darn clue!

PS: Did you ever think that you don't get your fish because you are just a lousy fisherman?

borninak
609
Points
borninak 07/01/13 - 02:59 pm
1
0
Not Mutually Exclusive Problems

Pengy,

You got it right. Probably there is a big problem with High Seas incidental bycatch and that's a shame because it would severly affect LOCAL fisherman in Cook Inlet and the Kenai River who have a legitimate right to harvest terminal fish. However, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to look at what has happened in the Kenai River and draw the conclusion that if you destroy the spawning area, you just might be creating an even bigger problem. The total collapse of the early King Run in June without any gillnetting occurring is solid evidence that sportfishing has loved that run to death. Kenai123 is too big of a hypocrit to take take a hard look at his contribution to the problem or even recognize that he also is benefitting commercially from salmon fishing. He consistently lumps Cook Inlet commercial fisherman with trawlers in the Bering Sea and labels it all evil commercial. The big difference is Cook Inlet fisherman have a legitimate right to harvest ALL salmon in Cook Inlet via limited entry commercial fishing permits issued by the state of Alaska.

pengy
250
Points
pengy 07/01/13 - 03:24 pm
0
0
Borninak, I agree with most

Borninak, I agree with most everything except for the line, "the total collapse of the king run in June without any gillnetting occurring is solid evidence that sportfishing has loved that run to death." Gillnetting in UCI has zero impact but solid evidence that sportfishing is the cause?

Following this logic, the Kasilof, the Anchor, the Ninilchik, Deep Creek, Kuskokwim, Yukon, Little Su, Karluk, Ayakulik rivers all saw king restrictions starting in April, did the inriver users in all these watersheds simultaneously cause the collapse of their runs?

I'm not saying sportfishermen haven't impacted early runs of king salmon but you got to look at the bigger picture and not just a "band aid" approach to the runs. I'm going with what the professionals from ADF&G have said (Tom Vania in particular), the problem with king salmon runs are out in the ocean.

smithtb
240
Points
smithtb 07/01/13 - 10:41 pm
1
1
Early Run Overharvested

There is all kinds of evidence that the early run has been over harvested inriver. These fish, which are tributary spawners, made up a significant portion of the large kings. While many of these fish entered the river in June, they stayed in the main stem for some time, and many were selectively harvested as large late run fish in July by guys like 123. As a result, it is likely that the ER stock is weaker than the late run and many other Cook Inlet King Stocks, none of which are stellar, but many of which will likely make their goals.

Alaskaborn
49
Points
Alaskaborn 07/02/13 - 10:28 am
0
0
Low exploitation rate on early run

ADF&G's latest report shows the recent exploitation rate on early run fish is less than the late run. The recent 10 year average exploitation rate is 20% for early run, late run is 35-36%. Tributary spawners only number around 9-14 thousand fish compared to late run of 30-50 thousand fish. Don't know how that can add up to a significant portion of large kings. Early run restrictions make it extremely difficult to overharvest this stock. Slot limit, no bait, sanctuary areas, annual limit of two, all these restrictions push most of the effort into July mainstem spawners. Tagging data also shows hardly any trib fish are below the bridge on July 1. Harvest data shows almost all the harvest is below the bridge while the slot is still in place above the bridge. Not sure what all kinds of evidence is out there for over harvest of trib fish other than the issue of the end of tributary fish and the beginning of mainstem fish overlapping in migratory timing. Too much is being made of that as the silver bullet when those trib fish face the same ocean conditions as all the other king stocks around the state. It just makes for a nice whipping post for people to point the finger at someone.

kenai123
1305
Points
kenai123 07/03/13 - 06:59 pm
1
2
smithtb

Pat Shields, Brent Johnson, Doug Blossom, Scott Ruttum, Rashah McChesney, Aaron Kaas, Megan Smith and Caleigh Jensen are all very clearly listed within the above story. If this publisher did not desire to have these names raised or discussed in-depth, they would not have published them.
If smithtb has a "personal problem" with readers actually addressing the people and information within this story I suggest that this is one of his many personal problem.

kenai123
1305
Points
kenai123 07/03/13 - 07:25 pm
1
1
smithtb

As usual smithtb has failed to see that all rivers and streams in Alaska have failing king runs. Any normal person would see this and logically conclude that the problem is located within our ocean. Obviously smithtb has some other reason for ignoring the truth and instead repeating a lie over and over.

Also our Kodiak commercial gill net fisheries have been up and running after June 9th for decades. This is a monster king salmon killer for the Kenai River first run of kings. So the reality is that every king run in the state is hurting. Rivers with zero in river anglers are experiencing the same king problem. The problem is commercial fisheries hammering everything in the ocean to death. The problem is not some "fresh water fantasy" it is a statewide commercial fisheries "over fishing event".

If you are a commercial fisherman, you are part of the problem. You may not have been part of the commercial fishermen who wiped out our herring or our crab but if you helped knock off thousands of kings in Cook Inlet, you are part of the problem. It is a not fresh water anything, it is saltwater everything.

Our future includes us closing down ALL of our commercial fisheries statewide, for at least 5 - 10 years. If I were a commercial fisherman I would be very interested in selling my investments as soon as possible.

beaverlooper
2570
Points
beaverlooper 07/03/13 - 07:30 pm
2
0
Sounds like

Sounds to me like local families working hard together ,strengthening the family bond , building character and a good work ethic (something sorely needed in today's society)and catching RED SALMON!
And by the way 123 you are also a commercial fisherman so if you think commercial fishermen and women are the problem count yourself in.

kenai123
1305
Points
kenai123 07/03/13 - 08:02 pm
1
1
Seafarer

Seafarer, you are the one who is "truely" ignorant. I do not care about either your or my personal family traditions, feeding either your kids or mine or the entire planet for that matter. This is not about patriotism, politics or even being a good or bad fishermen. Part of the reason you don't have the solutions is because you don't even understand the questions. There are no laws, regulations or moralities requiring us to "FEED THE WORLD" and if we are dumb enough, we don't even deserve to be able to feed our own families with fish.

This is about fisheries management, you can either commercial kill all of our herring, crab, halibut and salmon, while attempting to claim that you are not or you can stop the commercial slaughter and give our fisheries a break. Commercial fisheries are all about YOU, YOU, YOU. If our fisheries managers say you can fish, commercial fisheries don't even question the action, they just wipe them out. This is the same mentality which resulted in all of our salmon being wiped out with federal management by1959. Commercial fisheries thought management knew what it was doing back then but it did not, so they fished as long as management would let them with fish traps. You have to wake up. Management is sometime wrong. Our ADF&G was wrong back in 2002 when I told them the problem is in the saltwater and they said it is impossible. By 2007 they finally admitted the problem is in the salt. They were totally wrong for five years!. Our current fisheries management is blind to what they have allowed in the saltwater, which is the complete destruction of our herring and crab along with the rest of the marine food chain. That destruction will eventually catch up with every commercial fisherman in Cook Inlet, it is just a matter of time.

kenai123
1305
Points
kenai123 07/03/13 - 08:15 pm
1
2
beaverlooper

Beaverlooper, You are confused as to what commercial fishing is. In order to become a commercial fisherman you must directly sell a fish. It doesn't matter if you (promise to sell, make-believe to sell or provide a chance for someone else to catch) a fish. Once you "directly" sell that first fish, the state of Alaska requires you to become licensed as a commercial fisherman, buyer or processor. All the other meaningless information you are shoveling is not relevant.

beaverlooper
2570
Points
beaverlooper 07/03/13 - 08:51 pm
2
0
123

I'm not confused ,your talking semantics. The difference between being a commercial fisherman on the beach is they have to work for a living catching RED SALMON as opposed to in river commercial fishermen that sit on their A?? all day twisting their wrist and baiting hooks.Makes me break a sweat just thinking about it. ......Sarcasm ,if you don't get it.
GET A JOB!!!

kenai123
1305
Points
kenai123 07/03/13 - 09:17 pm
1
2
your commercial fisheries money addiction.

Okay, beaverlooper, Commercial fishing has been clearly defined by our courts as being a person catching and selling a fish for money to another person. All your claims of others also being corrupted are really baseless.

You are in fact an official commercial set net fisherman who will attempt to continue catching, killing and selling as many salmon as you can, for as long as the law will allow you to do so. Once you sell your first fish you have crossed a magical line. A transformation happens after you catch and sell a fish for money, not trade it, not help someone catch it, you have to personal catch and sell it for money. Once you do this you officially and magically transform into a person who can no longer be satisfied with the thrill of hooking into and landing a single fish. You acquire the fish cash fever, which is much like crazy gold fever. That fever infects your mind, eventually makes you fish crazy and willing to sell your best friends, relatives and natural resources down any drain just as long as you can catch and sell just one more fish. Logic or reason then takes a backseat as you favor every word out of your mouth to somehow allow you to acquire that next fish. Catching and selling fish then becomes an addiction much like alcohol drugs or gambling. At this point I suggest that the fisheries abuser go get a little fisheries rehab rather than trying to post all over the internet that the east side set nets do not catch our Kenai River kings.

These ESSN are slaughtering our Kenai kings, they need to be closed down, unless they can find a way to stop by-catching our kings. I do not expect you to be involved in finding a way for set nets to stop killing kings because you are addicted to the money which flows from the selling of our fisheries heritage to appease your commercial fisheries money addiction.

Beach Boss
124
Points
Beach Boss 07/03/13 - 10:55 pm
2
0
You are so far out there!!

Ok Mr. Kenai123 please don't tell me you really believe that ESSN are slaughtering OUR kenai kings!!! You own these kings?? I have every right to catch them just as YOU DO?? My permit allows for ALL salmon to be harvested. Just as you in river are harvesting MY red salmon. Give me a break!!

Lets do some fact checking...
http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/regulations/regprocess/fisheriesboard/...

Since 1986 Inriver Sport users have harvested more kings EVERY year, sometimes as much as THREE times what ESSN have. So I am pretty sure ESSN are doing NOTHING to this stock. At a average exp rate of 13% (8% if you want to count above 30") we will NEVER be the cause of eliminating this stock.

There is NO number of kings we can put in that river it will NEVER BE ENOUGH FOR YOU GUYS!!!! YOU want EVERY SINGLE KING ALL FOR YOURSELF!! DISGUSTING!!

smithtb
240
Points
smithtb 07/03/13 - 10:48 pm
1
0
QUICK, GET THE DOCTOR!!! HE HAS FISH CASH FEVER!!!

Fish cash fever... Yep, you nailed it. Guilty as charged.

What would you suggest for fisheries rehab? A completely non-commercial fishing trip with Johnson Bros? Surely they don't have 'Fish Cash Fever', because they don't make money catching fish.

Gimme a break dude.

beaverlooper
2570
Points
beaverlooper 07/04/13 - 02:59 am
1
0
I sport fish

123 I am not involved in commercial fishing in any way. Just calling you on your BS. I used to love to fish the Kenai till you guys took the fun out of it. Having another bad year or 2 would be good for the river in that it would hopefully get rid of a lot of you guides. Hopefully those that leave would not be allowed to return if fishing gets better.I realize why you are so freaked out, because your gravy train is about to come to a screeching halt and you may actually have to work for a living. Perhaps you should try Serenity House ,they treat all sorts of addictions and they may have one for recovering guides. It won't be easy but it can be done.

spwright
1376
Points
spwright 07/04/13 - 06:56 am
0
0
The FISH WARS

7/4/13 Happy BirthDay America
Once again THE FISH WARS continue on & on & on forever.

Constant BackStabbing, assigning Blame & in-fighting.
You Guys couldn't agree If It is Day or Night. This has continued for GENERATIONS NOW.

IF you are really that miserable ? It's Time to Change Your Profession. You are going to Give Yourself a Heart Attack w/ all of that Rage.

Think SUN SHINE today SPW "Airborne"

Suss
3218
Points
Suss 07/04/13 - 08:39 am
0
0
River Boats

I have noticed a lot of river boats for sale, prices seem a little high but that could change come Fall. Sad that the Kenai river system crashed for King fishing yet give her 20 to 30 years and the Kenai will once again be the maddening zoo of the 80's, only to watch the cycle begin again.

s2wheel
55
Points
s2wheel 07/04/13 - 05:26 pm
0
2
There is a village

Approx. ten years ago a village up north agreed to no moose hunting in their GMU for 8 to 10 years, now they have an abundance of bull moose, they still manage it where there is a limited amount of tags for that area and you have to be a resident of that area to get one.when I was younger I saw an abundance of salmon in our rivers,from kings to reds to pinks,they were all here,and a large amount.8 to 10 years ago I saw commercial drift boats fish in the mouth of kasilof, inside the mouth by the way,now what species of salmon do you think they caught? Were they all reds I think not,now the numbers have dropped on all salmon, and in years to come we will have the same problem with other salmon species that we are having with the kings now.STOP salmon fishing now in all areas sport,commercial,and subsistence, it is not right to close down one fisheries without closing the rest down,close them all for 5 to 7 years and see what the future holds for the salmon.

kenai123
1305
Points
kenai123 07/05/13 - 10:48 pm
1
1
s2wheel

We may all have to live together but we have an Alaskan Constitution which requires that we provide priority fishery access to subsistence users during low abundance. This means that by law we must (close off all other fisheries access first) and allow our remaining fisheries to be harvested only by public users who need it to survive. You can define subsistence fishing anyway you like but I will guarantee you that definition will not include selling your catch.

You know why you people don't know this stuff? BECAUSE YOU DO NOT CARE ABOUT OUR FISHERIES. You only care if you cannot catch a fish. When you care about a fishery you study it for thousands of hours, weeks, years, decades, while attempting to not repeat mistakes of the past. Few if any persons on this tread actually care about our fisheries. If they did they would know this stuff.

kenai123
1305
Points
kenai123 07/05/13 - 11:07 pm
1
1
smithth

Fish cash fever has no cure. Much like drug and alcohol addiction has no cure. You can go to fish cash fever rehab to allow yourself to survive but once you catch a bag of fish and sell them you cannot find a thrill in hooking and landing a single fish. It would be like a heroine addict being satisfied with a caffeine buzz, it won't happen. Fish cash rehab would be to take a long vacation to some island in the south pacific during the month of July. We all know that is truly impossible for a real fish cash addict so the only real solutions is take the drug (money) away and watch the freak-out, climb the walls withdraw spasms. This happened in 1959 when our commercial fisheries destroyed our salmon fisheries with excess fishing because our federal management said it was (okay). Here we are again in 2013 with our state management saying its okay to wipe'm out and our commercial fisheries are doing the same thing again, wipe'm out.

kenai123
1305
Points
kenai123 07/05/13 - 11:17 pm
0
0
beaverlooper

beaverlooper, you will not have to worry about the guides or the gill netter much longer. Think of it like this; our ADF&G is driving the bus and the bus is 50/50 guides and gill netter. The bus is going 100 mph and headed off a very steep cliff with everyone screaming and hanging outside the windows trying to get off the bus.

s2wheel
55
Points
s2wheel 07/06/13 - 11:11 am
2
0
Kenai 123

First I don't sell my catch, I do personal use fish for my own family,and I do know about the state constitution.the adf&g shut down the PU setnetters, they did not slow down the commercial setters,who just had a emergency opener today,check the escapement of reds on the kasilof the day after they fish the numbers go down a lot. On the other hand when you go to the mouth of the river and there is so many people in it that they are elbow to elbow,there is garbage floating in the water,fish waste so thick it reaks,there are campers camping on the dunes on he north side,our river beaches and fish will not survive this many people.i have lived here for 52 years ,fishing was a way of life for me and my family, if I have to change my way of life for a few years to keep the fish in our rivers then so be it. I am not for the commercial, guilds included ,I am not for PU or subsistence I am for keeping fish in our waters,if too many people are fishing the waters then something needs to be done.

beaverlooper
2570
Points
beaverlooper 07/06/13 - 11:53 am
2
0
Thanks

"if I have to change my way of life for a few years to keep the fish in our rivers then so be it..I am not for the commercial, guilds included ,I am not for PU or subsistence I am for keeping fish in our waters,if too many people are fishing the waters then something needs to be done."
I haven't lived here quite as long as you, this will be my 46th winter.You said it perfectly and I agree 100%,thank you.
We all have a part in the problem we all should have a part in the solution.

Seafarer
1147
Points
Seafarer 07/11/13 - 05:14 pm
0
0
123 Troll

123 is the same troll that posts his garbage in the ADN as Alaska123. It is a troll with nothing to offer, except vitriol to maintain it's bloated existance. It cannot be much of a fisherman, because it's too busy spewing hatred in the Clarion. I, frankly, would like to see it banned. It obviously has a deep-seated hatred of the Commercial Fishing effort on the Kenai. All fishing, except Mom and Pop with the Kids on the Kenai is Commercial fishing! Guides or nets, take your pick. 123 would beach if it was hung with a new line. I am ignoring the troll from now on, since that is what it gets paid for. Each response brings in a few cents. Speaking of sense, it don't have any. It's the person you see in the bar at 8 in the morning hurling his vomit at anyone who'll listen. It's the loudmouth at the coffee shop, hoping his stories will bring him a second cup.

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