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Feds halt Skilak area hunting and trapping

Posted: November 2, 2013 - 6:43pm  |  Updated: November 3, 2013 - 11:21am
File photo/Peninsula Clarion  In this Dec. 12, 2008 file photo Tamara Dotson makes her way through brush alongside Skilak Loop in pursuit of rabbits during a day of hunting with Ted and Elaina Spraker. Dotson was learning to hunt through a youth hunting program offered through the local chapter of the Safari Club.
File photo/Peninsula Clarion In this Dec. 12, 2008 file photo Tamara Dotson makes her way through brush alongside Skilak Loop in pursuit of rabbits during a day of hunting with Ted and Elaina Spraker. Dotson was learning to hunt through a youth hunting program offered through the local chapter of the Safari Club.

Beginning Nov. 10 the Skilak wildlife Recreation Area will be permanently closed to hunting and trapping the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge announced Friday.

The closure is in response to a 2013 Alaska Board of Game meeting which opened the area to firearms hunting for wolf, coyote and lynx, according to a media release.

The restriction is meant to support enhanced wildlife viewing, environmental education and interpretation within the recreation area according to the release.

The closed area includes 44,000 acres within the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge and defined by a line that begins at the easternmost junction of the Sterling Highway and the Skilak Loop Road, heads south to the south bank of the Kenai River then runs along the south bank of the river to its confluence with Skilak Lake, curves west along the north shore of SKilak Lake to Lower Skilak Campground then heads north along the Lower Skilak campground road and the Skilak Loop Road to its junction with the Sterling Highway, then east along the Sterling Highway to the point of origin.

The area — called the Skilak Loop Management Area — is closed to hunting and trapping except for moose that may be taken by Alaska Department of Fish and Game issue permit and small game which may be taken from Oct. 1 through March 1. via falconry and bow and arrow only.

Youth hunters may also take small game by standard .22 rimfire or shotgun in a portion of the closure from Nov. 1 through Dec. 31.

Deputy Refuge Manager Steve Miller said, according to the release, that the Skilak Wildlife Recreation Area was designated in 1985 as a special area to be managed with an emphasis on wildlife viewing and environmental education and interpretation.

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game issued a media release criticizing the closure including a statement by wildlife division director Doug Vincent-Lang calling the closure a “federal overreach into state management of fish and wildlife.”

 

Reach Rashah McChesney at rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com

 

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wilsonro
100
Points
wilsonro 11/03/13 - 06:41 pm
1
2
Feds

Federal overreach, in every aspect of our lives!!!!!!

ladyonthelake
3
Points
ladyonthelake 11/04/13 - 05:04 am
1
2
Federal over reach is out of control

The Feds are hell bent on turning the refuge into a park with their anti- hunting anti-resource use agenda. Our moose population is in severe decline while the predators are building. And so what does the Fish & Wildlife Service do? Build a 10 million dollar new visitor center with our tax dollars. Nice!

MathewCannava
28
Points
MathewCannava 11/04/13 - 10:37 am
3
1
Thank you Steve!

...for making decisions based on science!

The majority of Alaskans who DON'T have a hunting license are grateful for your actions!

MeO
29
Points
MeO 11/04/13 - 11:32 am
0
2
No Thank You Steve

...for making decisions based on your best guess and calling it science.
For the majority of Alaskans that DO have hunting and fishing licenses who understand real game management!

AKNATUREGUY
295
Points
AKNATUREGUY 11/05/13 - 09:41 pm
1
0
THE BOARD OF GAME

The Alaska Board of Game is out of control with over reaching predator control programs and a total lack of wildlife science based decisions.

THANK YOU Kenai National Wildlife Refuge for making sound wildlife management decisions based on science, NOT politics.

The moose population here on the Kenai Peninsula is in decline because of motor vehicle collisions and loss of habitat. Neither the BOARD OF GAME nor ALASKA DEPARTMENT OF FISH & GAME will rocognize the real limiting factors to the moose population. Instead, they simply blame everything on the natural predators; wolves and bears. The BOARD OF GAME is hell bent on killing every predator possible with the user of very expensive aircraft and helicopters. I wonder where the money comes from to fund these very expensive non-science based programs.

imagast
18
Points
imagast 11/06/13 - 02:45 pm
0
0
B OF G

As for loss of habitat, start cutting off the black spruce.
Give more room for moose browse.

akmscott
131
Points
akmscott 11/08/13 - 01:57 pm
0
2
The feds are over-run with

The feds are over-run with PETA members and fervent anti-hunters.The goal is to stop hunting slowly over time.

imagast
18
Points
imagast 11/08/13 - 12:12 pm
0
0
lop sided

I agree
Moose Pass can subsist(sp) they are closer to a store than me. why can't I

beaverlooper
2794
Points
beaverlooper 11/15/13 - 03:33 am
0
0
roads

If we didn't kill so many moose with cars we'd have a lot more to hunt
What creates browse is fire the way nature intended,when the old trees are out of the way new food grows moose have food to eat with the young stuff that takes their place.It happened in ,I believe 1949 and I saw with my own eyes happen after the big fires in 69 and 70
There were moose racks coming through town in droves.It's just a risk we are unwilling to take.
I do agree though there are to many bears and they could stand a little thinning out.

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