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Sport group targets set netters

Alliance looks to ban setnets in 'urban' areas of state

Posted: November 7, 2013 - 10:02pm  |  Updated: November 8, 2013 - 1:03pm
In this 2012 file photo, Parker Peck pulls a skiff out of the water Monday while helping out at the Frostad family setnet sites on Salamatof beach in Kenai. Setnetters in Cook Inlet are central to a recent ballot measure proposition which would ban setnetting in "urban" areas of the state.   Rashah McChesney
Rashah McChesney
In this 2012 file photo, Parker Peck pulls a skiff out of the water Monday while helping out at the Frostad family setnet sites on Salamatof beach in Kenai. Setnetters in Cook Inlet are central to a recent ballot measure proposition which would ban setnetting in "urban" areas of the state.

The group has changed names, expanded its mission and has members associated with another controversial sportfishing association but the Alaska Fisheries Conservation Alliance has not deviated from its original goal ­­— to shut down setnetting in the Cook Inlet.

The group filed a ballot initiative application Wednesday that seeks to ban setnetting in what it defines as “urban” parts of the state including the entire Cook Inlet, Valdez, Fairbanks, Juneau and Ketchikan.

Calling setnets “indiscriminate killers,” President Joe Connors said the organization’s goal was to have the initiative on the August 2016 primary ballot.

If the Department of Law determines the proposition to be legal, the group will have to gather more than 30,000 signatures to get the initiative onto a statewide ballot.

The fledgling organization counts among its backers, Bob Penney a powerful sportfishing advocate who holds considerable political sway in and is a founding member of another Cook Inlet organization — the Kenai River Sportfishing Association.

Other members include several current members of the KRSA including Kristin Mellinger, Joe Connors and volunteer Dennis Gease.

Connors, a retired University of Alaska Anchorage Professor and former West Side Cook Inlet Setnet fisherman who now runs a Kenai River lodge last fished a setnet in 1983 but during the five years he operated one he said he caught any number of ducks, birds, flounder, sharks and king salmon.

To that end, Connors said he wanted to see the setnet fishery shut down permanently in certain parts of the state.

This is not the first time this year that the six-month old organization has stepped in to keep setnetters out of the water.

In July, the group intervened in a lawsuit filed by the Cook Inlet Fishermen’s Fund against the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, which requested more fishing time for setnetters and accused the department of reallocating harvest of the sockeye run to other users.

Then called the Kenai King Conservation Alliance, the group had a goal of conserving Kenai Kings, said Penney in an August interview.

Penney said the Cook Inlet run of sockeye salmon could be managed without the setnet fleet as indicated by the 2012 fishing season when setnetters were largely kept out of the water by Alaska Department of Fish and Game managers in response to low numbers of king salmon.

However Jeff Regnart, director of the commercial fisheries division of Fish and Game, said it would be difficult to manage the Cook Inlet sockeye run without the setnets as the fish don’t travel in the same part of the inlet from year to year and are sometimes too close to shore for the drift fleet to catch them.

Ken Tarbox, former Fish and Game research biologist said eliminating the drift fleet would never be able to keep up with the sockeye run without wiping out fish headed for the northern part of the district where several species of pacific salmon have failed to return in adequate numbers.

Local and statewide commercial fishing organizations have yet to officially respond to the proposal.

Julianne Curry, executive director of United Fishermen of Alaska, wrote in an email that the group was not ready to officially respond to the proposition.

UFA is a commercial fishing organization that represents 36 commercial fishing groups in Alaska.

“Folks are still looking over the initiative and analyzing,” Curry wrote.

The Kenai Peninsula Fisherman’s Association, a group that represents primarily setnetters but includes other commercial fishermen in the Cook Inlet met Thursday to discuss the initiative.

President Robert Williams wrote in an email that the group would have a media release soon.

Tarbox said the culture of the Kenai Peninsula was such that user groups had tense relationships with one another as each tried to get a portion of the mixed-stock fishery.

“These are neighbors and friends and coworkers and I just think this is really sad for anybody even to be going down this path and putting the community through this because now it has come to this debate as to whether or not we want to have these people in our community because if we eliminate their livelihood they may leave,” Tarbox said.

 

Reach Rashah McChesney at rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com

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cormit
217
Points
cormit 11/08/13 - 11:42 am
2
0

kings

While eliminating Cook Inlet East side set-netters has been a long time goal of Bob Penny ... time is certainly running out if he wants to see this milestone accomplishment added to his legacy. Maybe it's now on a "Bucket List".

For this effort to work .... it will be necessary to convince Alaska voters of the need to eliminate an historic set-net industry .... one that has been here for a hundred years, and deeply imbedded in Peninsula History and its' people and their future.

Alaskans would have to be convinced that the "Kenai River King Salmon" is more valuable as a trophy fish than it is in the smoke house. Alaskans might disagree on that one.

No matter how you frame this effort .... it is a bold, arrogant and unbelievably selfish way to get what you want .... no matter what the cost.

pengy
243
Points
pengy 11/08/13 - 12:16 pm
0
0

Love to see this go to a vote

Love to see this go to a vote and that's what worries set betters. There are more sport fisherman than commercial but if the voters reject it I'll live with the results. Think the drift fleet wouldn't mind mopping up the excess like they did in 2012?

pengy
243
Points
pengy 11/08/13 - 12:18 pm
0
0

Sorry, no edit. That should

Sorry, no edit. That should say "set netters".

KenaiKardinal88
317
Points
KenaiKardinal88 11/08/13 - 03:10 pm
0
6

Best Idea Ever!

Setnetters are greedy, they control a "shared" resource, and they have done nothing to protect the dying King salmon runs.

Shut down these thugs!

Roger104
137
Points
Roger104 11/08/13 - 07:15 pm
2
0

KING FISHING IS RED HOT!!!

Wow Kenai Kardinal, I thought that setnetters were an important part of our diverse fishery and local economy, but after reading your awesome post, I realize that I was totally wrong! Please, bless us with some more wisdom.

On another note, the whackjob website "Alaska Outdoor Journal" says that Homer King Salmon Fishing is RED HOT! Don't worry though, due to all the (nonexistent) catch data from this fishery, we know that all the Kenai Kings swim far away to spend the winter... We know for a fact that all these fish are from Canada, and only setnetters catch Kenai Kings in saltwater, eh?

borninak
523
Points
borninak 11/08/13 - 08:02 pm
2
0

This is a joke

Roger,

KK88 has proven time and again that he is operating with half a deck, so don't be bothered with it. I can't really imagine the department of law deciding this initiative is legal, because if they did, it would open up quite a can of worms. Setnetters could respond with an initiative to get rid of Kenai River Guides, or someone could get an initiative to get rid of drifters, put it to a vote and everybody is gone. Surely the state isn't that stupid to go down that road. Where would it end?

cormit
217
Points
cormit 11/08/13 - 08:37 pm
2
0

Kings

Pengy ..... You assume the voters would vote your way if this makes it to the ballot someday. Really? You are most likely a river guide and think discarding the set-netters entirely would somehow benefit you personally. Maybe you think there would then be a lot more kings for you to sell to your clients. What a noble person you are.

Maybe there should be a ballot initiative to abolish guiding for king salmon? ..... not statewide ........ just where the general public thinks overcrowding is currently at an unacceptable level ....... like say ... the Kenai River? You think non-guided Kenai River anglers and personal use folks would hesitate to send you packing? The communities love affair with Kenai River guides just might be at an all time low. You should think about that.

And ..... KenaiKard ...... your barfed up response is always predictable. If you've ever had an intelligent thought about anything .... you've never shared it here. I'm probably not the only one that suspects you are actually 12.

Raoulduke
1824
Points
Raoulduke 11/09/13 - 02:36 am
1
0

The joke

Borninak- Yes! This state IS just that stupid.This state,and officials will do any STUPID thing.Just as long as the DOLLAR is in reach.

leewaytooo
1004
Points
leewaytooo 11/09/13 - 04:49 am
3
0

create a video showing all

create a video showing all the congestion on the river.
interview "clients" as they return with nothing caught.

start a web site and call it "Kenai River Fishing For Kings".

add the video to the web site along with still images
showing more of the same congestion.

take out adds in fishing magazines promoting
the web site.

avoid text on the web site, let the images create
the 1,000 words.

set netters first, then drifters will be next, and once they
are gone, the public fisherpeople will be restricted in
favor of the "guides", you know, money first,,, even if it
does leave the state.

might want to get started now......

pengy
243
Points
pengy 11/09/13 - 06:33 am
0
0

Many assumptions

Sorry cormit, I'm not a river guide.

If this is legal I'm all in favor of the will of the people. Put it to vote and see where it goes. Are you afraid that all the out state commercial fisherman won't have a say in this (there are more non resident commercial fisherman than non resident fishing guides by the way)? It's a fact that there are more Alaskans who are sport fisherman than are commercial set netters and that's what has people like you scared.

Heck, one set netter I know said after the last two seasons he wouldn't mind if the state bought him out at a fair price.

The times could be a changin'.

borninak
523
Points
borninak 11/09/13 - 08:01 am
1
0

Penygy, I say this won't ever

Penygy,

I say this won't ever make it to a vote because its fraught with legal problems. But your clueless with your point about resident guides and out of state commercial fisherman. That won't even be relevant unless only the people with a vested interest got to vote. As far as I know when an election is held everyone gets to vote and those with a vested interest in fishing would such a small part of the vote to be insignificant. The question would be wether the public would be in favor of removing an entire user groups livlihood so that a few sportfisherman could catch what few King Salmon are caught by setnetters. Considering the king salmon are currently caught by trawlers, saltwater sportfisherman, drifters, dipnetters, personal use fisherman, kenai river guides, setnetters and joe b public, going after the setnetters seems unjust and maybe the public would see that?
Pengy also suggests that the state would be paying off setnetters at a fair market rate. Therein lies the legal problems that I think prevents this from going to a vote. The state is in a real sticky spot here.

cormit
217
Points
cormit 11/09/13 - 08:53 am
1
0

kings

Pengy ....... There are far more Alaskans that enjoy wildlife viewing than there are Alaskans that hunt and trap. A ballot initiative to end hunting and trapping would make it pretty easy for "the will of the people" to make huge changes, wouldn't it? That's why we have a state constitution and a legislature and a board of fish and a board of game. A ballot initiative lets voters make a decision ....... but it doesn't require they know anything about the issue they're voting on.

The times were also changing back in 1968 when Cook Inlet commercial fishermen had the vision to put a limit on their numbers .... so their industry would be more sustainable over time. Ironic isn't it ...... the group that chose to limit themselves is the first one selected to be removed.

Carver
710
Points
Carver 11/09/13 - 10:56 am
5
0

The game plan . . same ol', same ol' . . .

Six years ago, April 24, 2007, Bob Penny testified before the House Committee on Economic Development and Trade/The Economics of Sportfishing. Here, in part, is what he said:

"There is a move on now, and it's going to the Board of Fish, and it will be in the legislature in an initiative or referendum that this will have to be take place. That the way the fisheries manage [sic] should be turned around one-hundred eighty degrees in Southcentral like it has to the rest of the United States, and that is, the public should have the first right to allocation for the fisheries they need. Your family, my family, people that live there should have the amount of the fish that they need for their own needs. And the tourists should. Then, whatever is surplus to our needs could be commercially harvested. That's the way the fishery's got to be changed and it's going to be coming down to see you in some manner in the next few years because the public's gonna wanna see that done. . .

"The economic value of the land along the Kenai River privately held from Skilak to Ames bridge; three years ago the assessed value to the borough of only the privately owned land was three hundred and thirty-five million dollars. As Mr. Busey just said to you, it's increased since then. Now, I know it's well over five-hundred, but we haven't seen what the borough's assessed it. But gentlemen and ma'm, all that assessment in value came from one reason; cause there's fish in the river. And you put the fish in the river, and you put the fish in the inlet, and you give the opportunity for the public you'll see the economic engine run hard."

That was six years ago . . nothing has changed . . Bob's effort to ban set-nets as "conservation" is nothing other than the latest gambit in his relentless attempts to implement his vision as outlined above.

Bob says his vision is what the public wants, but is that true? Are there not enough fish for sport-anglers as things are now? Does the public really want to destroy Cook Inlet's gill-net industry—a valuable part of our area's diversified, economic base—and make our sport-fisheries more congested than they are currently? Does the public want to see some fanciful "economic engine run hard" at the expense of a narrowed economic base, at the expense of more crowding on our rivers, at the expense of more and more and more "development" in pursuit of "economic value," at the expense of more habitat destruction, and at the expense of an even more crowded and developed Kenai River?

Bob didn't foresee back then our country's economic downturn. Bob couldn't foresee, six years ago, the destruction of the biggest Kenai kings by his "economic engine" fishery. Nor could Bob foresee the current downturn in chinook returns. And now Bob wants us to put all our economic eggs in one basket, the basket of a sport-fishery in trouble?

Does Bob really think Alaskans so dim-witted as to constrict our economic base in pursuit of some imagined "more fish/economic-engine-run-hard" sport-fishery?

Bob's vision for our future is demented, a gross mistake, and an economic disaster plan. But Bob Penny is serious . . make no mistake about that. Write letters, send emails . . expose Penny's "conservation" BS for what it really is . . just the latest in his relentless efforts to develop Cook Inlet into a gigantic sport-fishery at the expense of habitat, a diverse economy, jobs, lifestyle, and much more.

KenaiKardinal88
317
Points
KenaiKardinal88 11/09/13 - 11:12 am
0
4

Get Rid Of Set Net Commie Fishers

Alaska has lost hundreds of millions in defaulted loans to commie fishers.

Many commie fishers are out-of-staters who leave nothing but their trash.

Set netters have not been releasing king salmon - everyone one on the Peninsula knows that a lot of kings go through the processors.

Commie fishers pay almost nothing in taxes while taking from a shared state resource.

Commie fishers troll the halls of Juneau and bypass what's best for a majority of Alaskans.

It's time to shut these greedy nuts down.

borninak
523
Points
borninak 11/09/13 - 03:31 pm
4
1

Greedy Nuts?

Isn't it amazing how brash, insulting, and vile one becomes when they can hide behind their screen name and spew hatred and insults at their neighbors? If your going to attack people and call them names, you should let us know who you are, otherwise your just a coward.

Roger104
137
Points
Roger104 11/09/13 - 05:24 pm
2
0

FACT CHECK ALERT!!!

Pengy, Retardedkard, get your facts straight. 71% of Kenai River guides are Alaskan residents. 84% of Cook Inlet Setnet permit holders are Alaskan residents, and of those residents, 80% live on the Kenai Peninsula. This stuff isn't hard to look up. I guess it's just more fun to say whatever you want, cause who really checks, right? Heck, Joey, Ricky, & Bobbie have been getting away with that for years, haven't they?

The number of residents participating in both commercial fisheries are high, and they are both a very important part of our diverse local fishery and economy. Honestly, it baffles me that someone who lacks the mental power to understand this could even turn a computer on, much less type comments, primitave though they may be.

sparky
45
Points
sparky 11/09/13 - 09:24 pm
0
3

BAN SETNETS

I'm certainly in favor of banning the setnets.I understand that it has been going on for years & years,but that don't make it right.Many of the old practices regarding other things,have had to change.I think that is another one that needs to change,or,go away.There's tooo many of them,tooo close together,and they catch everything that goes up that beach,headed for the River...Everything!! If you are fishing the Lower River when the Nets are out,you are wasting your time.Setnets have earned the nickname "IRON CURTAIN".
I think it's time they go away.

Carver
710
Points
Carver 11/10/13 - 07:25 am
3
0

Not even . . .

"There's tooo many of them,tooo close together,and they catch everything that goes up that beach,headed for the River...Everything!!"
*********************

Not even false . . the set-nets fish designated periods of time at prescribed distances apart in order to harvest the sustainable yield of a mixed-stock fishery. Historically, the set-nets take 0% of first-run, Kenai kings and about 13% of second-run, Kenai kings.

The set-nets are a valuable part of Cook Inlet's gill-net industry and as such contribute significantly to our area's broad, economic base.

potomac
171
Points
potomac 11/10/13 - 04:43 pm
1
0

the never ending fish fights on the Kenai Peninula

too much bla bla and no real solutions, just a bunch of name calling. How did the set netter that came up with a new net design do this last year?? any follow up or did I miss it. No one is stupid or out for the money as all users are loosing these days, so get the old fashioned American Brains geared up and really think of a way to turn this around. For one,everyone needs to be cut back, how about cutting the guides to 100 on the Kenai , 50 on the Kasilof, cut the set netters and drift fleets by who has fished the longest and cut it by 1/2, have drift only days except Sat and sunday for all sport and guide fishermen. Give it 3 or 4 year ,go and look at the statistics , they tell the truth, not politics, etc. do something no other state has done and give these fish a chance to rebound and see what made it happen. Don't forget the ground fishing fleets, cut them back and have a small by catch and monitors on board who have the authority to shut the whole fishery down in 24 hours. Stop the fights, we are all losing the fish, so get to work, join up the groups and do something sooner than later after the genetics are lost forever.

markw3
9
Points
markw3 11/10/13 - 11:55 pm
0
1

more justification

It seems like the only reason anyone has to keep set netters around is that they are "an important part of AK's diverse economy." Any other reasons? I'd love to hear them...
The fact is, as long as set netters continue to utilize non-discriminate means at which to catch fish, they'll continue to be a target for sport fishermen, and anyone else who understands fisheries management. It's also important to realize that the economic benefits AK is provided by the set net fleet could easily be cancelled out by the opportunities that same fleet potentially takes away by catching fish species indiscriminately.
Also understand that I am not attempting to blame the entire Kenai River mess on set netters; there are plenty of other issues that need to be addressed as well (urbanization, loss of habitat, water conditions, selective harvest of magnum kings, etc.) but set netters are one of those issues that needs to be addressed.
So let's talk solutions... what about an attempt to re-legalize fish traps (a selective way to harvest sockeye), which could replace some of the set-net fleet? Or what about fish wheels (another selective way to harvest sockeye)? There has to be a less barbaric way to harvest fish! There are plenty of smart people in fisheries management, the set net community, and the state of AK that realize set net fishing is the wrong way to commercially harvest fish, and have the intelligence to come up with a solution.... why is it taking so long?
It is my opinion that set net fishing near the mouth of the Kenai is within 10 years of going away. I just hope smart people can come up with a substitute that our set net community can transition to.

rwhobby
161
Points
rwhobby 11/11/13 - 08:15 am
3
1

Target the wrong group!!

The guides are the biggest problem on the Kenai River, need to make the Kenai drift boat only. The bank erosion, hydrocarbon problem, too many guides, and too many out of state guides. Need to be year round resident to guide on the Kenai. The natural resources are for the people not special groups.
NO to GUIDES.

profishguide
11
Points
profishguide 11/11/13 - 05:11 pm
1
1

ballot initiative

ballot initiatives for fishing are real and legal, just look at Florida's statewide gillnet ban, Oregon's Columbia river mainstem gillnet ban (they were netting long before Alaska was even a state) which are in effect because the mainstream public cares about the health of the resource, not how much a netter puts in his pocket or spends locally. I myself would be looking for a better way to target Sockeye's, Fishwheels etc.

Raoulduke
1824
Points
Raoulduke 11/11/13 - 06:41 pm
1
0

What?

KK-88 Just what is meant by "COMMIE FISHERS"? This is a term unknown to me.

rwhobby
161
Points
rwhobby 11/11/13 - 07:57 pm
3
1

Guides must go

Need to make the Kenai drift boat only, only Alaskan residents can be guides,so the money stays in state, fish from Eaglerock to the mouth to protect the spawning grounds.
The Alaska state constitution, The natural resources are for the people of the state, it doesn't say anything about special user groups.
The set net fisherman catch less than 1% of the total king population, the guides catch way more than that.

FrozenNorth
54
Points
FrozenNorth 11/11/13 - 08:56 pm
1
0

Oregon gillnet ban

The Oregon initiative failed 65%-35%. A month later, the Oregon Governor then did an end-round by bringing the issue to the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission, which banned gillnets on a 4-2 vote. It is widely regarded that the Commission bowed to pressure from the governor's office to make the ban happen.

profishguide
11
Points
profishguide 11/11/13 - 11:05 pm
0
0

Oregon gillnet ban

As soon as CCA got it on the ballot the Governor came up with a plan that lets them fish the side channels. There were other initiatives that failed in the past too, but its in effect and legal.

Earlier this year, the Washington and Oregon Fish and Wildlife commissions adopted a plan proposed by Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber that prioritizes recreational fisheries in the mainstem of the Columbia River and eliminates the use of non-tribal gillnets in the lower Columbia’s mainstem after a transition period. The Governor’s plan was unprecedented, and was offered in the wake of CCA Oregon’s successful efforts to put a gill net ban initiative on the Oregon ballot last November. Unlike the ballot initiative, however, the Governor's plan resulted in both states
adopting a plan that eliminates the use of non-selective gill nets.

Commercial gillnet interests in both states subsequently filed lawsuits challenging the new reforms and in response CCA Washington and CCA Oregon formally intervened in the cases. CCA Washington retained former Supreme Court Justice and State Senator Phil Talmadge to
represent recreational anglers in the Washington lawsuit, which culminated with the court’s
decision to dismiss the lawsuit.

Beach Boss
124
Points
Beach Boss 11/12/13 - 11:10 pm
2
1

Lets get some facts.

Lets talk facts...

The ESSN fishes with small mesh nets to target Sockeye but they do take about 13% of the total Kenai River King run on average. Because of the net size almost half of those are 1.1 or 1.2 jacks and about 7% are the larger 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5 breading component.

Now, the in-river sport fishery takes about twice that 26% on average and because of selective harvest trageting the larger fish almost all of that 26% is the 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5 breading stock. Some of which are taken right off the spawning beds and the sportfish harvest shows a tendancy to take more females than males, probably to get roe for future fishing trips. Now, kick in hook & release mortality involved in sorting through fish to get a bigger one.

Now, if an unbiased person would consider this information, which fishery would you restrict more if conservation of King salmon was truly your goal? If you had to choose one user group to eliminate for conservation considerations which one would it be?

There is no doubt in my mind that this whole initiative's intent is allocative. Eliminate ESSN catch so there will be more Kings for Bob and the guide industry to catch. This is all about GREED anyway you slice it and it should'nt be tolerated. If and when there truly is a conservation issue all user groups whould shoulder the burden of conservation equally and work together to find the best solutions for the protection and future well-being of the resource. The resource should always come first...not GREED.

pengy
243
Points
pengy 11/13/13 - 08:38 am
0
2

Beach Boss....13%???Here are

Beach Boss....13%??? Let's use current facts and figures.

Here are the numbers I found ADF&G website for total kings harvested in 2013.

ESSN's................2,784
Sportfish..............1,571

If you can believe ADF&G's numbers that's 56% more kings harvested by set netters than by rod and reel.

Beach Boss
124
Points
Beach Boss 11/13/13 - 09:00 am
2
1

Keep Looking

Its funny you would stop at 1 year in your fact checking Pengy. The final numbers for this years total run are not in. I am sure they will be way higher like they were in 2012. So lets not use 2013 numbers quite yet. But I will let you know 70% of our king catch this year was 1.1 and 1.2.

Lets look at historical numbers to really get an idea. Yep looks like inriver has harvested almost double what ESSN have. Like I said earlier inriver usually targets the larger females.
http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/regulations/regprocess/fisheriesboard/...

Yes I believe ADF&G numbers that rod and reel is harvesting more than setnetters. 400 Plus guide boats with how many ever clients going over and over the spawning beds pulling the larger females off 6 days a week. Compared to ESSN 2- 12 hour periods. Yep that is a pretty clear picture of what is going on in our river.

But I am sure that none of this data you believe since it doesn't support your claim that the ESSN are the demise of the late run. What happened to the early run?

pengy
243
Points
pengy 11/13/13 - 09:39 am
1
0

More fact check.Total

More fact check Beach Boss.

Total registered guides 2013......285 (not 400, and of the 285 that includes upper river trout guides)

Total days a week allowed for guiding....5 days (not 6)

I still go by what ADF&G's Tom Vania has said, and what the most recent Peninsula Clarion article was titled, "Widespread King Decline of Kings Points to Natural Forces". You have to look beyond "no setnetting during the first run" and realize the issue is in the ocean, not freshwater. It doesn't matter first or second run, kings are in decline statewide. Here's a question about first run king salmon in UCI. Why is the first run of hatchery enhanced king salmon in the Kasilof in decline? Is it all the guides and sportfisherman catching the out migrating smolt. Why aren't they returning? Ship Creek is probably best example of "ocean issues" because it is 100% hatchery and the returns have been very low. You got to look beyond your backyard and see the bigger picture with low king returns statewide.

All user groups need to sacrifice until we're back to abundance. I don't think any group should be banned but I think restrictions need to continue and ADF&G needs to manage accordingly.

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