Starting a legal cannabis grow begins with ‘immaculate conception’ of plants

The recent denial of Alaska Loven It’s license to cultivate cannabis raises a question not often discussed in Alaska’s growing marijuana industry. How do legal commercial grows get plants to begin farming pot?

“There’s a lot of confusion about it. There was a lot of confusion about it when we started,” said Leif Abel, owner of Greatland Ganja in Kasilof, the second licensed cultivation facility in Alaska and the first to go to market.

At the Jan. 22 Homer City Council meeting, council members unanimously voted to recommend denying Alaska Loven It’s standard cultivation license application after Homer Police Chief Mark Robl wrote a memo saying an officer had found 24 plants in excess of six personal use plants at the planned grow operation on Kachemak Drive. Police investigated after anAlaska Marijuana Control Office inspector passed on to police a citizen complaint of marijuana smell coming from the building. At AMCO Board meetings Jan. 24-26, the board unanimously denied the application. If approved, it would have been the first legal cannabis cultivation facility in the city of Homer.

“You have to be licensed,” said AMCO Director Erika McConnell in a phone interview last Thursday about why the board denied the Alaska Loven In application after police found 24 plants.

For the rest of this story, visit the Homer News.

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