A difficult job done well

It’s clear to anyone who steps inside or is served by Central Peninsula Hospital that our community has something special.

The success the hospital has had — high patient satisfaction ratings, hospital and service expansions and recruitment of specialty physicians — can be attributed to a number of people, from the Central Peninsula General Hospital Inc. board to the staff members.

However, the anchor of that continued success has been Chief Executive Officer Ryan Smith.

It’s unfortunate for our community that Smith decided last week that he will leave our community in mid-November for a similar position in Wyoming. But, before he goes, it should be made clear how appreciative we are for his hard work and dedication over the last several years.

Without Smith’s work ethic, integrity and attitude, the hospital might not be where it is today and our appreciation for that cannot be understated. Smith is well known by his colleagues for having taken on several difficult challenges that had been previously ignored by past CEOs.

Rich Davidson, CPH director of support services, said, “Ryan has the strongest character of any CEO I’ve had the privilege to work for.”

He has also consistently been willing to put his career on the line to do the things he believes are right, Davidson added. But, as they say, that’s all in the game for Smith and a sign of what we are losing.
We hope as he prepares to leave the Peninsula that other staff members at the hospital take note, if they haven’t already, of the qualities that have made Smith’s stay a successful one.

A great leader makes those around him or her better, and it’s easy to see that’s the case at the hospital, but that philosophy should remain as the CPGH Inc. board seeks an interim and permanent replacement for Smith.

We wish them well in that pursuit over the next few months — you’ve certainly got big shoes to fill.

We would also remind the committee searching for a replacement to keep in mind Smith’s advice — it’s critical for a CEO to reach out to all aspects of the community, assembly and borough.

That’s a sentiment that has made CPH what it is so far and it’s one necessary for the hospital to have to continue growing and improving. That attitude must firmly be held by whoever takes the reins.

In short: We wish Smith well in his future pursuits in the Lower 48 and thank him for all that he has done for our hospital and community. It truly can’t be understated. We wish the CPGH Inc. board luck in finding a replacement, although we know it won’t be easy.

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