Making a house a home

A home is more than the sum of its parts.

A home is where families can cement relationships, where youth can grow and where dreams can flourish.

A home itself is often a dream for its owner.

During the last 20 years, the Central Peninsula Habitat for Humanity has built 17 homes that have served such a purpose, allowing growth, dreams and nourishment to occur that might not have otherwise happened.

Those structures will stand for a long time as a testament to all who contributed. But this year, Habitat for Humanity decided to hold off on building home number 18 so that it could better establish itself in the community.

When the group was founded in 1992, organizers said support came pouring in and the effort was strong and bold. Houses went up and residents moved in.

But since, costs have gone up. More and more things compete for our volunteer time. It seems there are an endless amount of organizations that need volunteers, but perhaps this year, per Habitat’s request, we can re-energize and pick up again the fresh spirit the organization had in 1992.

Donate what you can — time, resources, ideas. The group said it needs folks with connections to building supplies, municipal planning and other resources. Perhaps that’s you and you’re what they need.

If nothing else, this should serve as a time for all of us to reflect on our own homes and give thanks for what resources allowed us to be in it. There are many who are not so fortunate to have the comfort of heat or the security of windows, doors and locks. 

We know there are many already living on the Peninsula with the need. We know there are those willing and able to help. So, let’s work.

In short: Central Peninsula Habitat for Humanity deserves a large round of applause for its work in the area — 20 years is quite an achievement and we can’t wait to see what the next decades bring. For residents, we would encourage you to seek out the organization and give what you can — all is needed and all is welcome.

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