Q&A with Soldotna City Council candidates

1. Describe the biggest issue(s) facing Soldotna. What should the council do to address them?

 

Dale Bagley: We have two big issues facing the City of Soldotna. The first issue is the amount of money in the General Fund. It is almost 20,000,000 and growing, and is too high for our city. The council has reduced the mill rate two years running now but we are going to have to look at other options. The second problem is we have more capital project needs then we have employees to handle the projects. We are currently going through a process to get some help managing our capital project needs.

 

Nancy Eoff: Not sure what the biggest issue would be, but a big issue might be securing reliable revenue sources to fund construction and maintenance of park and recreation sites. This summer’s tourism shortfall has been quite an eye-opener.

 

2. What, if anything, would you change about the city’s budget?

 

Bagley: I am OK with our budget, it has come a long way in the last few years and there have been a lot of positive changes in out the budget is presented to the Council, including a 5 year capital plan to help us get manage our operating and capital needs. I wish more people would participate in the budget process. A budget is the most important thing you can do as a council member.

 

Eoff: Nothing.

 

3. What parts of the city’s new comprehensive plan are you most excited about implementing?

 

Bagley: We need to be promoting economic development for the city of Soldotna. We currently have a boom of new construction in Soldotna, both public and private, but we need to continue to be supportive of new and existing businesses.

 

Eoff: Recreational master plan.

 

4. Does the city adequately balance commercial and residential development?

 

Bagley: Yes, but are running out of land in the core part of Soldotna for both types of development.

 

Eoff: Yes, especially considering the limited (7.4 square miles) area within the city limits.

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