Good advice for the end of the world or any occasion

For most of us, fortunately, our world did not come to an end on Friday. Indeed, many of us draw hope from the winter solstice, looking forward to enjoying a few more moments of daylight in the coming days.

With all the hubbub over the end of the Mayan calendar, the Clarion surveyed some Kenai Peninsula residents on what they thought the end of the world might look like, and what advice they might have for coping. While our questions may have been asked a little bit tongue-in-cheek, we got some advice we think would be great to follow every day, whether the end of the world is imminent or not.

Living in a place where volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, wildfires and extreme weather events are somewhat regular occurrences, Alaskans tend to be better prepared than most for a large-scale disaster.

Ted Spraker, a longtime Fish and Game area manager and current Board of Game member, suggested that people talk with their families about “‘What if?’ and ‘What would we do?’” That’s good advice when preparing for any emergency situation.

If you haven’t already, make sure you have an emergency kit and a plan for your household. If it’s been a while since you’ve used it, make sure your fist aid kit is stocked and the batteries in the flashlights are fresh. Check your vehicle to make sure safety items for winter travel are stashed there, too.

You can find plenty of useful information and links to checklists on the Kenai Peninsula Borough’s Office of Emergency Management website, www2.borough.kenai.ak.us/emergency/default.htm.

Borough Mayor Mike Navarre said “there will, of course, be heroes and villains ... be a hero.” We agree, the world can always use another hero.

Kenai Mayor Pat Porter suggested mending bridges with others in your life — and having dessert first once in a while — just in case. Soldotna Mayor Peter Micciche said he’d spend a quality day with his family — sledding followed by a bonfire. Sounds perfect to us.

We’ll leave you with one final thought for Kenai City Manager Rick Koch: “Be good to each other and act like we should act all the time, like we act to each other on Christmas day.”

So, here’s wishing you a merry Christmas and happy New Year — no matter what the world may throw our way.

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