Inspiration 'Written in Stone'

Some of the national anger with Lance Armstrong has to do with the fact that the inspiration he provided for so many transcended his sport — and that inspiration now seems as fraudulent as every yellow jersey hanging on his wall.

Fortunately, we are blessed here on the Kenai Peninsula with plenty of people from whom we can draw inspiration, people who are battling cancer themselves or supporting a friend or loved one in their fight. Indeed, they are living strong every day of their lives.

The community heard from some of those people last week, when Central Peninsula Hospital hosted its “Written in Stone” event in its new radiation oncology center. People were invited to write an inspirational message on the building’s concrete walls, which will be compiled in book to be given to patients treated there.

Words were written from the heart.

“Keep your smile, laughter, courage and positive attitude during this fight with cancer. Let them always be a part of you.”

“Believe, live every day like you mean it. Believe that anything is possible.”

“Let your faith be bigger than your fear!”

The American Cancer Society estimates that 1.6 million people will be diagnosed with cancer nationwide in 2013, including 3,290 in Alaska. Chances are, we all know someone who has been affected by the disease — friends, coworkers, neighbors, family. We’re glad to see the resources available for cancer treatment in our area expand.

We’re also glad to see that in our community, we can look to those same friends, coworkers, neighbors and family for support and inspiration. And we’re glad that they’re willing to share it.

Though the words from the “Written in Stone” event will eventually be covered during the next phase of construction, we hope the inspiration will remain.

More

Op-ed: Trump won the news conference

Donald Trump should do press conferences more often. Not for the country’s sake, certainly not for the media’s sake, but for his. He really shouldn’t have waited 167-plus days to hold one, because the man gives great sound bite. Although I’ve participated in probably thousands of these staged encounters as a reporter, they’re not my favorite way of getting news — you almost never get any. The guy at the podium controls the proceeding. He can get his message out with little challenge from the assembled journalists who are limited to a question and a follow-up, maybe. Politicians can bob and weave through that without any of us landing a blow. And that’s our job: to penetrate the canned responses to their version of the controversy du jour and get at whatever truth they are hiding. Besides, Trump — who uses contempt for the media as a weapon, his preferred way to discredit reporting that displeases him —has a wonderful forum to do that. At the very least he should hold these confrontations as a supplement to his Twitter tirades. And frequently. It’s his opportunity to hold the media hostage as they cover live his rain of abuse on them.

Read more

Good luck in Juneau

The 30th Alaska Legislature gavels in on Tuesday, and we’d like to take a moment to wish our Kenai Peninsula legislators good luck over the coming months in Juneau.

Read more

Ready to weather the storm

If there’s a bright spot in the recent headlines regarding Alaska’s economy, it’s this: on the Kenai Peninsula, the bad news isn’t nearly as bad as it could be.

Read more

Letters to the editor

Chuitna mine threatens Alaska way of life

Read more