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King Conservation Alliance calls for fishery management changes

Posted: July 31, 2013 - 12:06pm  |  Updated: August 1, 2013 - 9:13am

It is a bit ironic, but the Salmon Policies Alliance op-ed piece (published above and last week in other publications) states, “… the Kenai River is not at risk or in crisis …” Really? The very next day, the Kenai River and the East Side Set Net (ESSN) fishery were closed for fishing due to a dismally low return of Kenai kings. While there is a big run of red salmon, the Kenai kings caught by the ESSN has put the Kenai king run in jeopardy.

The closing of the river last week by Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) was absolutely the right thing to do, it should have been much sooner. The seven largest kings ever caught came from the Kenai — each weighed over 90 pounds. Our Kenai kings are a world renowned national treasure. They must be protected. The extremely low return numbers of Kenai kings tell the tale — we must act now or these spectacular fish will be lost forever.

There are two means of commercial fishing for reds in Cook Inlet. There are about 640 Drift Fleet boats which fish two or more miles off shore. Last year, the drift fleet proved they could harvest the reds without catching Kenai kings. Other than interception of North District reds and silvers, we have little problems with the drift fleet, since they catch few Kings. Earlier this year, we pled with the Governor and the Commissioner to not use the ESSN, but use the drift fleet as they did so successfully last year. Then, they caught ninety-five percent of the State’s red harvest goal.

The second means of commercial harvesting reds is the fixed-in-place “set nets.” There are 750 set net permits in Cook Inlet — about 390 of them, known as the “East Side Set Netters,” who fish above and below the Kenai River — stretching from East Forelands to Ninilchik. This is over 70 miles of nylon nets forming gates 600 feet apart and stretching one and half to two miles off the beach. They are lethal traps, few fish can get past them, including the majestic Kenai kings who migrate along the beaches in shallower water on their way to spawn.

This year the nets killed approximately 3,000 “reported” kings and the ESSN is now ironically suing the ADF&G for more fishing time. We have enjoined on the side of the State to disallow that request.

In June, the ADF&G projected a minimal Kenai king run, even less than last year’s record low return. Knowing this, the Commissioner and Department, started off the season using the ESSN anyway. Our big question is: Why didn’t they use the Drift Fleet like last year? That wasn’t a biological decision, what kind was it? The responsibility for Kenai kings not making minimum escapement this year lies with ADF&G and on the desk of the Commissioner. Period.

The Salmon Policy Alliance piece refers to ‘economic factors.’ The following facts are clear. Per studies by the State of Alaska, U of A and others, more than 80 percent of the salmon harvest allocated to commercial fishermen generates less than 20 percent of the economic value to our communities. Cook Inlet anglers and dip netters get less than 20 percent of the fish and generate more than 80 percent of the economic value within our communities. In addition, the studies show the economic value to our communities of sports caught salmon is 8-15 times that of a commercially caught one. We anglers get a minimal share of the salmon harvest, but produce at least five times the value of the entire commercial catch in Cook Inlet.

We can all agree on one thing — we need new policies for sharing and preservation of our wonderful salmon fishery. And, it’s about time the public receive our fair share. Maybe it’s about time for a public initiative to do so.

Kenai King Conservation Alliance

Bob Penney, Founding Member

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jpblough
23
Points
jpblough 08/01/13 - 10:31 am
0
1
ecological impact

Mr Penny, Would you ever consider putting limits to the amount of anglers and guides who use the Kenai River? If we increase the sport fishing numbers like you purpose would be so financially beneficial do you have any ecological concerns for the river? If you are not able to abolish the ESSN would you consider compromises like reducing the depth of the nets for as you probably know Kings run deeper then Sockeye. Do you invision a Cook Inlet with zero commercial fisherman? I have enjoyed both commercial and sport fishing in Alaska on a yearly basis since 1985 and would love to help come up with a solution that perserves the rights of "all the public" and sustains the environment. Is there any organizations that have this attitude. Seems like you dont like the commercial fishing industry very much. Remember this was the primary industry that helped settle Alaska 100 years ago. I know sport fishing has been around for a while but the time line goes like this: subsitence, commercial and then the sportfishing/ tourism industry. Finally is there anyway you can define what exactly a "fair share" looks like?

akkindgirl
41
Points
akkindgirl 08/01/13 - 11:37 am
2
2
Your a joke!

Bob keep your money, big wigs, and corrupt paid off politicians where they belong. In Anchorage. I am a year around tax paying citizen on the Kenai and totally fed up with the rude sportsfishermen of whom you represent. Quit blaming the Kings on the ESSN. The information you provided here is very inadequate. Unless you have been on a drift boat to personally witness their catch throughout the commercial fishing season you are clueless by saying they don't catch kings. We locals talk and I can tell you every drifter I know catches kings in there nets so quit spreading lies. Also I find it amazing that you bash ESSN. The ESSN I know are fellow teachers who aren't paid very well to educate Alaska's future so they need to find a way to support their families during the summer months. Not only are they fellow teachers they are outstanding teachers that each of my children have had the pleasure of being taught by and list as one of the most influential and best teachers they have had as they have progressed through the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District. So shame on you for bashing this one group. Studying Fishing is not an exact science so I pose each user group affects the King run and to point the finger at one group is discriminatory.

Bob since you claim to know so much about the Kenai River king runs please answer the question as to why the Early run of kings are in such trouble and the ESSN don't even fish during this run and haven't for a long time? Obviously something other than the ESSN have destroyed this early Kenai salmon resource or this run should be in good shape.

Shame on you for misinforming the general public who has a lack of common sense. Your spending a lot of time and money to attack a group of hard working individuals who do a lot for our local communities. Your selfishness, rude, and big money mentality came through loud and clear in your article. You should be ashamed of yourself for fueling the fish wars on the Kenai. It doesn't go without notice to him who knows and sees all.

WRO
116
Points
WRO 08/01/13 - 01:15 pm
0
4
Ranting and Raving won't solve the problem

Akgirl,

The ESSN's play a role in the demise of the late run kings, same as the sportsfishermen and trawlers.

Just because they are school teachers does not change their or anyone's impact. The ER kings face different issues from Pollack bycatch, sportfish harvesting, and both runs face bad ocean conditions.

If you look where the money has gone, it has gone in large part for habitat restoration and studies..

And to bring god into your argument.... I think he left the kenai river salmon wars years ago when greed took over on all sides.

Carver
1133
Points
Carver 08/01/13 - 01:56 pm
3
2
The epitome of hypocrisy . . ?

Bob Penny's Letter-to-the-editor (Clarion, 8/1/13) is at best ill-advised and at worst the epitome of hypocrisy. How should we understand the man who has done more than any other to hype the very fishery that has decimated the big fish he professes to care for now whining about protecting them?

Kenai kings are not some "national" treasure as Penny extravagantly asserts, Kenai kings are nothing more than one part of a much greater whole, which is the mixed-stock fishery that is Upper Cook Inlet, and the whole of the UCI fishery is greater than the sum of its parts.

Moreover, the Kenai king fishery is, in the eyes of many, a disgrace, a size-matters, dog-and-pony show, which, if it weren't so short-lived would decimate the Kenai River itself with overbuilding, overcrowding, pollution, turbidity, erosion, and more.

It is economic lunacy and sheer selfishness beyond measure to suggest holding the benefits of our entire UCI mixed-stock fishery and management tools for sustained yield hostage to one species of fish and to the single, small user group that preys upon those fish.

19581958
77
Points
19581958 08/01/13 - 02:37 pm
4
1
Common Sense Rules

Over the years (Since State Hood and Before) we have commercially fished Alaska waters. We have achieved this by learning not to over fish these waters. When ever there was a slight chance that we might be over fishing, our hired professionals that we pay (State of Alaska Professionals) have come up with a sensible way to fix the problem. Examples would be IFQ's for Halibut, Buy Back for King Crab, and Limited Entry for commercially fishing salmon, just to mention a few. I agree with keeping all of Alaska's fisheries very strong, and be a good example to other parts of the world. Now with that said, when are we going to put restrictions on In River Guiding, and In River Dip Netting? Whats Good for the Goose is Good for the Gander. This could be an easy fix if we set aside all politics. Lets benefit both sides, and use Common Sense.

WRO
116
Points
WRO 08/01/13 - 02:45 pm
0
1
How can you say that

There are two runs of King Salmon in the world that have the genetics to consistently produce 75lb plus salmon, and hundreds of rivers world wide that produce Sockeye.

To treat them as a commodity is short sighted at best and a sad reflection on the user groups as a whole. To put 400 commercial fishermens part time job and an equal number of non conservation minded sportfishermen above a very unique strain of fish is a travesty.

The fact that the ESSN's and guides fight each other while the commercial trawl by catch of Kenai bound salmon soars shows how shortsighted and misinformed both local groups are.

Carver
1133
Points
Carver 08/01/13 - 03:06 pm
5
2
Hmmmmmmmm . .

Everything is a commodity . . only the users differ, and Kenai kings are just another commodity, noteworthy simply for their relative size. If a "size-matters" angler really wants big fish, let them catch tarpon or billfish or tuna.

The ESSNs traditionally take none of first-run Kenai kings and about 15% of second-run Kenai kings. The sport harvest takes about 25%, and about 50% spawn.

Trawler by-catch is a whole 'nother issue . . all harvest of the earth's resources for human use unavoidably engenders some "by-catch." Relative to the metric tons of fish harvested by trawlers for human consumption, the by-catch is miniscule.

No this current "whine" is just one more blow in Penny's never-ending effort to decimate Cook Inlet's gill-net industry. Back in 2007, six years ago, Penny told the House Committee on Economic Development & Trade, ". . you put the fish in the river, and you put the fish in the inlet, and you give the opportunity for the public you'll see the economic engine run hard."

Penny's goal is the decimation of gill-netting in Cook Inlet in favor of sport-fishing. No management for sustained yield, no broad-based, economic benefit from commercial fishing and its support industry, no Cook Inlet fish for those Alaskans and Americans who get their fish from markets and restaurants.

Economic-engine-run-hard? Nor could Penny foresee the economic downturn that only makes it more foolish to put all our economic eggs in one basket.

There are plenty of fish for everyone except for those who want it all . .

. . they can never be satisfied.

WRO
116
Points
WRO 08/01/13 - 03:18 pm
0
2
Miniscule

"Trawler by-catch is a whole 'nother issue . . all harvest of the earth's resources for human use unavoidably engenders some "by-catch." Relative to the metric tons of fish harvested by trawlers for human consumption, the by-catch is miniscule."

80,000 King salmon a year is miniscule? Especially considering that our early and late run kings are highly susceptible due to the amount of time they spend in the ocean.. The chance for ocean take goes up exponentially each year a salmon spends in the ocean.

For example, on a river in Oregon.. The Jacks have less and a 5% ocean take in fisheries, where as the 5 year olds are taken at a 90%+ rate by trollers and trawlers.

"There are plenty of fish for everyone except for those who want it all . ."

Make sure your are looking in the mirror next time you say that...

WRO
116
Points
WRO 08/01/13 - 03:18 pm
0
2
Miniscule

"Trawler by-catch is a whole 'nother issue . . all harvest of the earth's resources for human use unavoidably engenders some "by-catch." Relative to the metric tons of fish harvested by trawlers for human consumption, the by-catch is miniscule."

80,000 King salmon a year is miniscule? Especially considering that our early and late run kings are highly susceptible due to the amount of time they spend in the ocean.. The chance for ocean take goes up exponentially each year a salmon spends in the ocean.

For example, on a river in Oregon.. The Jacks have less and a 5% ocean take in fisheries, where as the 5 year olds are taken at a 90%+ rate by trollers and trawlers.

"There are plenty of fish for everyone except for those who want it all . ."

Make sure your are looking in the mirror next time you say that...

19581958
77
Points
19581958 08/01/13 - 04:18 pm
1
0
We Need Professional Help

We have one of the best fisheries in the World, and its only getting more published thru out the world. We have expanded our airports to handle the increase in volume of fishing tourist. You all think its tough now, how about five, ten, twenty years from now. Think about it for just a minute. All the fish will be gone due to mismanagement, and greed. Oh ya the greeders can rely on the Pebble Mine income next.

spwright
1376
Points
spwright 08/01/13 - 04:01 pm
1
2
Do You Guys EVER Stop Fighting ?

8/1/13 These FISH WARS have been going on & on for GENERATIONS now. Endless bickering, fighting & backstabbing. You Guys couldn't agree If it is Day or Night.

Enough Already ! Find a Leader that can make some decisions then everyone follows those decisions.

Enough of the Endless Fighting Already. SPW

jpblough
23
Points
jpblough 08/01/13 - 04:26 pm
1
0
questions

I wonder if Mr Penny would you ever consider putting limits to the amount of anglers and guides who use the Kenai River? If we increase the sport fishing numbers like you purpose would be so financially beneficial do you have any ecological concerns for the river? If you are not able to abolish the ESSN would you consider compromises like reducing the depth of the nets for as you probably know Kings run deeper then Sockeye. Do you invision a Cook Inlet with zero commercial fisherman? I have enjoyed both commercial and sport fishing in Alaska on a yearly basis since 1985 and would love to help come up with a solution that perserves the rights of "all the public" and sustains the environment. Is there any organizations that have this attitude. Seems like you dont like the commercial fishing industry very much. Remember this was the primary industry that helped settle Alaska 100 years ago. I know sport fishing has been around for a while but the time line goes like this: subsitence, commercial and then the sportfishing/ tourism industry. Finally is there anyway you can define what exactly a "fair share" looks like?

Paul Dale
69
Points
Paul Dale 08/01/13 - 07:25 pm
4
2
Bob Penney

Every paragraph in Mr. Penneys' article save one, are simply incorrect as to facts. The one exception is his observation that the drift fleet harvested 95% of the sockeye return last year. He ponders why we shouldn't adopt this as an ongoing strategy. There are quite a few reasons why not, it would hardly be fair to a large group of setnet families who have been harvesting fish this way since before statehood with little adverse impact on Kenai river sportfishing, much less the resource. Secondly, those in the know understand that we were lucky last year to have had it work, the volumes were right, the entry pattern was right,and the winds were right, not likely repeatable. Those interested in the facts of the other seven paragraphs should contact a group such as the Alaska Salmon Alliance, where factual information on these subjects is available.

LHART11
75
Points
LHART11 08/02/13 - 09:24 am
4
2
Selfish, Selfish Penney and His Destructive Hypocrisy

As usual, Penney is trying to destroy the commercial fishery; a fishery vital to Alaska and the Peninsula; a fishery rich in the community’s social-economic well-being. Why? Because his vision is selfish and exclusive: one of a limitless, open-ended in-river sport fishery created to drive the economy and quench his own greedy personal interests; one of little regard for other user groups, and other fisheries; one that overflows the carrying capacity of the Kenai River and kills the largest Kings at their ultimate stage and most vulnerable environment - spawning.

Don’t be fooled by Penney’s “King Conservation Alliance”. We know from the past that his do-good monikers are a disguise for destruction, and more like code for, “All for me, none for you.” His tactics are evident in the Early Run, where even in the absence of the East Side Set Net (ESSN) fishery, his political push for in-river exploitation of the Kenai Kings has resulted in the worst returns in history. So much for blaming the ESSN’s. Then we have his Kenai Classic, where the State’s Attorney General caught his Kenai River Sport Fishing Association practicing unethical behavior on behalf of the Classic. Not to mention the Classic first exploited and ruined the May, then June, then July King fishery. Now it’s moved into the August Coho fishery. Go Figure.

Mr. Penney, your political antics and selfishness are the only things putting the Kenai Kings in “jeopardy.” “Lost forever” will have YOUR signature, not the ESSN’ers - they have fished and sustained the run for over a century, always putting enough Kings in the River for a good return. The only “initiative” the public needs, is one that removes YOU and your politics from having anything to do with the Kenai River. The jig is up. The “King Conservation Alliance” is anything but an attempt to conserve Kings. It is motivated by hate for other user groups, like the ESSN’ers.

WRO
116
Points
WRO 08/02/13 - 01:04 pm
1
1
In times of low abundance

Everyone should take their licks, the second Run should have been C&R from day one and the ESSN's severely limited. The Kenai run is tanking for numerous reasons and to blame one group or exonerate one group based on social feelings is pretty narrow minded.

The perception and message the commercial lobby puts out, is we don't care about the kings, all we care about is money and tradition. Read any pro ESSN post on here, they all say the same thing, its the guides and sportfishermen's fault, we've been doing this for years its our right to kill the last king.

Bob has some good points with regards to conservation, protecting the run, and allocation. All things that need to evolve to meet our changing society.

Paul brought up some interesting points, but their statement on KTUU killed any conservation credibility, saying we should just see how many we can kill and still get a return, thats a special kind of GREED right there.

http://www.ktuu.com/news/ktuu-conservation-groups-fish-game-seek-common-...

The "concern" is is just greed, nothing more nothing less. Most of the great red runs we've had of late have been off over escaped years. NOAA and others have come out recently in studies stating that over escapement is actually better for the runs because the added nutrients add to the overall fecundity of the run due to higher amounts of nutrients for the smolt.

Bottom line, the reason we are seeing low runs region wide, is that the ocean sucks for kings right now region wide. Evidenced by large returns of 1-3 ocean bucks, that coincidently don't provide for the overall fecundity of the run and shouldn't be counted in the adult spawner counts for SEG.

To take any of these fish and lose the genetic diversity seems short sighted at best.

Now back to your regularly scheduled hating of each other..

Carver
1133
Points
Carver 08/02/13 - 02:19 pm
1
0
Same ol', same ol', same ol' . . .

"Bob has some good points with regards to conservation, protecting the run, and allocation. All things that need to evolve to meet our changing society."
************************

Nothing new, WRO, it's the same rhetoric we've heard down here for years from Mr. Penny. Destroy Cook Inlet's gill-net industry, put all our economic eggs in one, sport-fish basket, "they-will-come," "economic-engine-run-hard," yadda, yadda, yadda.

It is precisely the in-river sport-fishery, commercial and private, that has decimated the BIG Kenai kings, the very fish Mr. Penny professes to care so much about.

The overall, statewide decline in chinook NUMBERS is due to unknown factors, nothing more.

Call the Soldotna office of ADF&G and talk to the biologists there . . 262-9368

kingsize
34
Points
kingsize 08/02/13 - 10:03 pm
1
1
Right on Target!

Cudo's Bob, great piece that says it all! My but there are a lot of commercial people in this forum that are upset! Read it all and enjoy the comments. Found some to be so old and worn out that I almost fell asleep. Let me try to answer some of the more obvious ones;

AKG--no ESSN fish the first run of Kenai River Kings so who is to blame there? Well certainly the Kodiak set nets fish the heck out it as well as the Southeast commercial fishermen who btw were restricted this year to only 175,000 King Salmon for all gear types,,,last year,,285,000 hhhmmmmm. And didn't the ESSN fishermen fish in June this year? Oh yeah, they fished that last Thursday of the month when the in river fishery was closed. Admitted to 300 kings killed,,,probably closer to 10% of the real number.

C--lets do some more carving here! ESSN take only 15% of the Kings and the Sportsfishery takes 25%,,,, huh not according to the factual data that ADF&G has on the books from the 80's. In 1988 the Sportsfishing harvest was put at 17,300 Kings, the Processors reported over 90,000 Kings from ESSN. There was a Kenai River Sportsfishery closure in 1990, the last 4 days of July and ESSN kept killing. The protests that came about from that issue changed the way ESSN disclosed the true amounts of Kings caught and it has never been truthfully told since. Let's look at it with some common sense,,,your going to actually tell me that a guy with a single hook on a rod and reel,,,ok 300 guys with a single hook and rod and reel take more Kings that a mile and a half of net,,,excuse me,,300 guys with several mile and a half of nets each,,,in a day??? Get real.

CSR--We have learned not over fish any commercial fishery,,,REALLY. My friend there is a word that conflicts with that idea in every commercial mind that loves that Red at $20 per fish or any other commercially caught anything for money,,,GREED. King Crab you mention,,,well let see the numbers,,this last Red King Crab commercial catch was just over 900,000 Red King Crabs. Take a look at the 1980's when they consistently caught over 100 million Red King Crabs. Ok then look at the East Coast of America and the commercial Cod fishery,,,,same thing,,,different ocean, greed.

PD--those in the know understand that we were lucky last year to have had it work, the volumes were right, the entry pattern was right,and the winds were right, not likely repeatable. Well PD, it worked again this year. In fact they out did last year, in terms of money.

JPB--would you consider compromises like reducing the depth of the nets for as you probably know Kings run deeper then Sockeye. J considered it in 1999 and it was rejected at the BOF by the ESSN. There was a test study done in Bristol Bay in 1997 and 1998 and it showed that the Kings in fact did run deeper, the commercial guys there went to 29 panes instead of 45 and walla, many more King Salmon did make it into the rivers. They are still fishing them today and there is no real shortage in rivers like the Nush. But ESSN did not want to change,,however to give some their due I hear a few are moving in that direction and that is a good thing.

WRO--19581958--I agree to much of what your comments say.

So what are we to do? How about shutting down all commercial fisheries and all sportfisheries until we have the minimum King Salmon escapement goal attained in river? No good huh? Probably work for the 1st run but I can see how the commercial guys wouldn't like it because the reds would be gone by then in the 2nd run. Ok, how about the 2nd run, July Sports fishery closes until July 20th and remains open for Kings thru August 20th? Commercials close on August 1st. We know that 1/2 the 2nd run of Kings now comes in after August 1st. The Reds are pretty much done by then and would be if we let the commercials fish constantly in July. Kings that come back in August,,Spawn in August will return again in August. Probably give the ESSN a black eye in less than 10yrs as they would not be catching any Kings during that time period. Ok nobody likes that either I guess. How about ADF&G getting the governor to build a 30million dollar King Salmon hatchery across from the Moose River and enhance the King Salmon run. Take the wild Kings out of the river and raise them in the hatchery untill time to release them back into the river. British Columbia has been successfully doing it now for 3yrs and getting the same wild genetic strain and size of the wild Kings they take eggs from. ADF&G does it for the Reds, every drainage, every year! Just a thought.

Anyway, way to many short sighted people here, I may be one of them. I think that the dip net fishery is fine, it is for the RESIDENTS of ALASKA and I think they should/deserve to get their fish first. Besides, the money grab for the state that it is will ensure it never goes away, believe that! City dock launch a boat=$25,,car parking=$15,,tickets,,tickets,,camping fees,,the list goes on. Watch out ESSN, ADF&G's win in court will have lasting impacts on your fishery,,garranteed. With that win, they can pretty much do what they want in the future. Greed, it's a terrible thing,,,something that will never go away.

aksteelman
16
Points
aksteelman 08/03/13 - 10:12 am
1
0
Thank you King Salmon Conservation Alliance!!

Unfortunately the Kenai King has been under predation by users for TOO LONG and the only way to change things within Upper Cook Inlet is to limit the predation.
Sports fishing was closed last year to help solve the problem and so was the ESSN fishery. This is EXACTLY what was needed to preserve the prized Kenai King Salmon.

Sorry ESSN your "fable" that you tell the politicians and Fish and Game commissioner Cora Campbell that the department is over-escaping the river of kings is just that, a fable.
EVERYONE that has used the river for years and EVEN the ESSN group knows there are LESS KING SALMON returning every year, and over escapement is NOT PROVEN.

Being we have been hammering the kings for so long, isn't it time to TRY SOMETHING NEW???? Like maybe letting MORE kings in the river rather than lowering escapement goals in a play to allow set net fishing?

I'm sorry for the ESSN group, and the guides, and the people that use the river, no one wants anyone going out of business or making their riverside property worthless but the Kenai River King needs protection.
We all need to put our nets on the beach, put our fishing rods in the garage, and allow these fish to return and spawn.

By the way, I'm not some greenie that wants all fishing to stop,
I have a house on the river and 3 kids that HATE fishing now that there are NO FISH.

if its between, me stopping catching kings on the Kenai, ESSN group putting their nets on the beach and my kids getting an opportunity to catch a king sometime in the future,
then my vote is to put the nets up for a while and all suffer thru this problem we made.

robert white
378
Points
robert white 08/05/13 - 01:19 pm
0
0
kenai river

We're loosing the vary fish that made this river famous, will it be greed or the future stock? God save the King!!

19581958
77
Points
19581958 08/06/13 - 03:35 pm
0
0
Hold Onto Your Money

I had the pleasure to fish for Kings with my nephew Tom from his power boat on the Kenai River. I was waiting for a shaft bearing for my commercial Drift boat to arrive from Homer. I teached my nephew from Seldovia how to fish the Kenai River years ago. This was around the 20th. of July. I always try to get out with Tom at least once a year to fish for Kings. As you know we Drifters hardly ever catch a King in our nets because we mostly fish way out from the beach. Anyways we spent all day fishing for Kings and didn't see one net up in the air all day, really? The water was clear, the hundreds of guides were out in force, we worked the river from Sunken Island all the way down to the Lower Bluffs, and in between with nothing. I have fished and lived on this river since the early 70's and something is wrong with this picture. I can see not to long into the future that there will be a lot of river frontage property for sale at record low prices. So if you always wanted to own river frontage on the Kenai River hold onto your money because there will be a flood soon. More then likely it will be property owned by the hundreds, and hundreds of guides killing this river.

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