Enjoy the peace and quiet

Take a deep breath — after the frenzy that is July on the Kenai Peninsula, it’s time to relax.

To call July a busy month is an understatement. Powered by the long hours of sunshine and pleasant weather, we’ve been out fishing, hiking, biking, running, swimming, boating, floating, camping, golfing, four-wheeling, fishing some more — you get the picture. What’s more, as “Alaska’s playground,” we’ve been sharing our community with what feels like most of the rest of the state’s population, as well as visitors from the Lower 48 and the rest of the world. Needless to say, with all the traffic and people visiting, it has felt a little crowded around here lately.

But with the end of July also comes an end to the bulk of the madness. The Kenai River dipnet fishery is done; the one on the Kasilof is winding down. Most of the visiting sport fishermen have packed up and are headed back home. Things are quieting down and thinning out on the river. There’s now room to cast about — just in time for silver season. And the various hatches of mosquitoes have, for the most part, died off to tolerable levels.

It’s starting to get a little dark at night — we can start catching up on that sleep we’ve been putting off since the solstice.

Soon enough, we’ll be sending our kids back to school and we’ll be right back into the daily grind. After that, winter will be right around the corner.

But for now, take a few moments to enjoy the relative peace and quiet while it lasts.

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