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Letter to the editor: Limits for all

Posted: November 18, 2013 - 4:04pm  |  Updated: November 18, 2013 - 7:02pm

With all the discussion concerning the Kenai River King salmon I am surprised that the issue of excessive guide pressure has not been brought up. The” commercial” guide industry impacts the Kenai on two fronts. One being the sheer number of kings that this commercial fishery kills and the second is the adverse affects this industry has on the quality of life on this river.

One does not have to speak to many sport fishermen from south central Alaska to realize that many if not most have stopped fishing the Kenai for kings because of the overcrowding on the lower river. Between being squeezed out of the traditional holes and the excessive wakes generated as these”commercial” boats transfer clients from one hole to another the river takes on the picture of true “combat fishing”.

In terms of number of kings killed by the 400 or so boats the possibilities are staggering. If each boat killed 2 per day they would account for 800 per day total or 4,000 per wk. In 6wks they could account for 24,000 kings! One entrepreneur built a hotel along the banks of the river and runs a string of 6 or so guides to service his clients. This hotel owner can account for 12 dead kings each day or 60 each week!

The guide industry complains about the number of miles of net the set netters have out each fishing day. Yet if each guide boat had 4 clients out in a day they would account for 1600 hooks dragging the river each day. That number times an 8 hr day means 12,800 hook hours each day!

The point is that the guide industry needs limits imposed upon them just as the set netters have. The sheer numbers of permits needs serious reduction by whatever method the powers to be choose. One method of course is to treat the king as a trophy fish and issue drawing permits for the privilege of killing one.

 

Peter E. Cannava

Soldotna

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pengy
258
Points
pengy 11/19/13 - 04:55 pm
3
1
Good idea but you need to go

Good idea but you need to go further with in river restrictions. If guides are restricted there will still be a demand to fish for king salmon. This will spill over to more rental boats and private boats accessing the river. It needs to be a person cap, not a guide cap and the devil is in the details about percentages in each user group.

kenai123
1322
Points
kenai123 11/20/13 - 03:20 pm
1
3
Peter & pengy please call your local ADF&G office...

The mind-numbing ignorance of this article is absolutely spectacular. How could anyone be so confused on our statewide king salmon problem? You appear to be another commercial fisherman who is so interested in reversing the fingers pointing at him that you completely fail to see the science which is attempting to inform you that our king problems are not local, they are in fact statewide. Can it be that difficult to just pick up the telephone and make a single call to an AD&G office and ask them if our king problems are local or statewide? If you would have just spent a couple of minutes on the phone with our ADF&G, you would not of had to spend hours typing out your ignorant letter. We have many rivers in Alaska with zero anglers fishing them and those rivers also have a serious king problem like the Kenai River. Your co-conspirator the Clarion has also been working over-time basically pumping out only anti-angler articles which are also based on this same mistaken non-science belief. Please listen up, the Kenai River DOES NOT possesses some kind of special magical local king salmon problem. Again all rivers flowing into our ocean around Alaska are currently experiencing a serious kings salmon problem and that can only mean that we have in fact an very large ocean king salmon problem NOT A RIVER KING PROBLEM, THIS IS AN OCEAN KING PROBLEM! CALL THE ADF&G AND LEARN SOMETHING.

Suss
4183
Points
Suss 11/20/13 - 07:56 pm
3
1
123

I happen to know the good doctor spent many, many nights attending Kenai/Soldotna Fish and Game Advisory Committee meetings addressing these issues. He has earned and learned his right to speak out about fishing issues. So be careful when you throw around a word like ignorant, it might just land on your lap.

borninak
681
Points
borninak 11/20/13 - 08:34 pm
4
1
I called Fish & Game

I called Fish & Game and they were "amused" when I told them 123 said to call. They hide when they see him coming in the door. And they wouldn't support anything 123 spews. What a joke that 123 even thinks for a second that ADF&G agrees with ANY of his delusions. It might be that he has disparaged the department repeatedly in this forum and then wants everyone to believe they've some how got his back. And who is "reversing the finger pointing at them"? Talk about ignorant. ... Mr. Cannava has an insightful opinion, he shared it, most people agree so get over it 123. Sometimes the truth hurts.

kenai123
1322
Points
kenai123 11/21/13 - 04:12 am
1
3
borninak and Mr. Cannava are both plainly incorrect.

borninak, what an interesting way of providing readers with your enlighten fisheries prospective. You just BLAAA, BLAAA, BLAAA the internet with your personal opinion and as usual fail to post even a single fact. For your personal information our ADF&G has no persons back except their own and sometimes not even that but in the case of a local vs. non-local king problem they believed in a local king problem up to about 2003 - 2005 and then the mounting losses around the state began to make them look bad so they flipped to a non-local king problem. Also I specifically suggested that you call them and ask the local vs. non-local king problem question. I did not suggest that our ADF&G will support anyone on any issue, it just so happens that they also believe in a non-local king problem. You also know this now and that is why you did not list what they told you on the location of the problem. Do you really believe that people cannot see how you are trying to manipulate them?

Okay borninak, here you go, you deserve this.

I am very sure all readers have noted the claimed ADF&G contact and then also noted the total failure to list the results of that contact. I wonder what that means? This is how commercial fisheries attempt to manipulate public opinion. What about Tom Vania, Ray Beamesderfe, Ricky Gease, Kevin Delaney and Robert Begich, are you going to also declare that you know more than them also? I have listed below just some of the actual science out there regarding our king decline, which you appear to not be able to locate for some reason.
------------------------------------------------------
“The canary in the coal mine for me is the Nelson River,” Robert Begich said.
The river, also called Sapsuck, is on the Alaska Peninsula between Nelson Lagoon and Cold Bay. “They’ve closed the king fishing there the last couple of years and nobody sport fishes there,” Begich said.
http://juneauempire.com/state/2013-11-10#.Uo37sie0bxU
-----------------------------------------------------
Biologists: Alaska king salmon woes tied to ocean
http://www.newsminer.com/biologists-alaska-king-salmon-woes-tied-to-ocea...
-------------------------------------------------
Kenai Mayor Pat Porter, left, speaks to Alaska Department of Fish and Game Commissioner Cora Campbell following a news conference on July 20 in Anchorage. Porter attended a news conference led by Campbell and Alaska Gov. Sean Parnell to address actions the state can take in light of the poor king salmon run statewide, affecting both subsistence and commercial fishermen.
http://www.alaskajournal.com/Alaska-Journal-of-Commerce/July-Issue-5-201...
--------------------------------------------
Faced with a statewide king salmon crisis, state fish managers are banning Copper River dipnetters from keeping kings after midnight Sunday.
http://www.alaskadispatch.com/article/20130622/alaskas-prized-king-salmo...
--------------------------------------------
“The canary in the coal mine for me is the Nelson River,” Robert Begich said.
The river, also called Sapsuck, is on the Alaska Peninsula between Nelson Lagoon and Cold Bay.
“They’ve closed the king fishing there the last couple of years and nobody sport fishes there,” Begich said.
http://juneauempire.com/state/2013-11-10#.Uo37sie0bxU
----------------------------------------------
" From the 2012 symposium came a report by the ADFG Chinook Salmon Research Team that identified 12 indicator stocks from major river systems to portray the health of Alaska’s kings, and research priorities to better understand the forces at play. The problem is more complex than just blaming the poor returns on managers, and data suggests that the statewide king salmon decline may be outside of the realm of control for area biologists and attributable to ocean conditions such as changes in temperature, currents or food competition."
http://www.alaskastar.com/Alaska-Star/November-Issue-1-2013/Statewide-ki...
-------------------------------------------
"Tom Vania, Fish and Game’s regional fisheries management coordinator for Cook Inlet, says the new restrictions this year shouldn’t surprise people, noting that only four of 17 Cook Inlet-area streams met their state escapement goals in 2012."
http://articles.ktuu.com/2013-04-18/king-salmon_38654874
-----------------------------------------------
"We're in a period of low abundance and low returns, statewide, and whether it's from Southeast, Copper River, Cook Inlet, Kodiak, Nushagak, Yukon, we're just in this period of low productivity in the ocean," said Ricky Gease, a biologist and director of the Kenai River Sportfishing Association.
Biologist Tom Vania, the Cook Inlet regional coordinator for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, said the widespread failures of king salmon returns indicate the problem isn't freshwater-based, such as not enough adult spawners in the prior generation, or a loss of eggs from some kind of river catastrophe."
http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2012/06/24/153591/decline-in-king-salmon-is-r...
--------------------------------------
Decline in king salmon is rooted in the sea, state biologists say. What ever's plaguing state's salmon isn't in the rivers, experts say.
http://www.adn.com/2012/06/23/2517571/decline-in-king-salmon-is-rooted.h...
http://www.adn.com/2012/06/23/2517571/decline-in-king-salmon-is-rooted.html
------------------------------
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Poor king salmon returns have state biologists limiting fishing throughout Alaska and biologists have their eyes on the ocean as the problem.
http://washingtonexaminer.com/biologists-alaska-king-salmon-woes-tied-to...
-----------------------------------
ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Something in the ocean has been death to Alaska's king salmon. Decline in king salmon is rooted in the sea, Alaska state biologists say.
http://tdn.com/lifestyles/decline-in-king-salmon-is-rooted-in-the-sea-al...

" From the 2012 symposium came a report by the ADFG Chinook Salmon Research Team that identified 12 indicator stocks from major river systems to portray the health of Alaska’s kings, and research priorities to better understand the forces at play. The problem is more complex than just blaming the poor returns on managers, and data suggests that the statewide king salmon decline may be outside of the realm of control for area biologists and attributable to ocean conditions such as changes in temperature, currents or food competition."
http://www.alaskastar.com/Alaska-Star/November-Issue-1-2013/Statewide-ki...
-------------------------------------------
"Tom Vania, Fish and Game’s regional fisheries management coordinator for Cook Inlet, says the new restrictions this year shouldn’t surprise people, noting that only four of 17 Cook Inlet-area streams met their state escapement goals in 2012."
http://articles.ktuu.com/2013-04-18/king-salmon_38654874
-----------------------------------------------
"We're in a period of low abundance and low returns, statewide, and whether it's from Southeast, Copper River, Cook Inlet, Kodiak, Nushagak, Yukon, we're just in this period of low productivity in the ocean," said Ricky Gease, a biologist and director of the Kenai River Sportfishing Association.
Biologist Tom Vania, the Cook Inlet regional coordinator for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, said the widespread failures of king salmon returns indicate the problem isn't freshwater-based, such as not enough adult spawners in the prior generation, or a loss of eggs from some kind of river catastrophe."
http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2012/06/24/153591/decline-in-king-salmon-is-r...
--------------------------------------
Decline in king salmon is rooted in the sea, state biologists say. What ever's plaguing state's salmon isn't in the rivers, experts say.
http://www.adn.com/2012/06/23/2517571/decline-in-king-salmon-is-rooted.h...
http://www.adn.com/2012/06/23/2517571/decline-in-king-salmon-is-rooted.html
------------------------------
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Poor king salmon returns have state biologists limiting fishing throughout Alaska and biologists have their eyes on the ocean as the problem.
http://washingtonexaminer.com/biologists-alaska-king-salmon-woes-tied-to...
-----------------------------------
ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Something in the ocean has been death to Alaska's king salmon. Decline in king salmon is rooted in the sea, Alaska state biologists say.
http://tdn.com/lifestyles/decline-in-king-salmon-is-rooted-in-the-sea-al...
--------------------------------------
There are at least another ten or twenty of these out there on the web but borninak can't seem to locate them.

kenai123
1322
Points
kenai123 11/21/13 - 04:04 am
0
3
So why didn't the Clarion publish these king salmon articles?

Biologists: Alaska king salmon woes tied to ocean
http://www.newsminer.com/biologists-alaska-king-salmon-woes-tied-to-ocea...
-------------------------------------------------
Kenai Mayor Pat Porter, left, speaks to Alaska Department of Fish and Game Commissioner Cora Campbell following a news conference on July 20 in Anchorage. Porter attended a news conference led by Campbell and Alaska Gov. Sean Parnell to address actions the state can take in light of the poor king salmon run statewide, affecting both subsistence and commercial fishermen.
http://www.alaskajournal.com/Alaska-Journal-of-Commerce/July-Issue-5-201...
--------------------------------------------
Faced with a statewide king salmon crisis, state fish managers are banning Copper River dip netters from keeping kings after midnight Sunday.
http://www.alaskadispatch.com/article/20130622/alaskas-prized-king-salmo...
--------------------------------------------
“The canary in the coal mine for me is the Nelson River,” Robert Begich said. The river, also called Sapsuck, is on the Alaska Peninsula between Nelson Lagoon and Cold Bay.
“They’ve closed the king fishing there the last couple of years and nobody sport fishes there,” Begich said.
http://juneauempire.com/state/2013-11-10#.Uo37sie0bxU
----------------------------------------------
" From the 2012 symposium came a report by the ADFG Chinook Salmon Research Team that identified 12 indicator stocks from major river systems to portray the health of Alaska’s kings, and research priorities to better understand the forces at play. The problem is more complex than just blaming the poor returns on managers, and data suggests that the statewide king salmon decline may be outside of the realm of control for area biologists and attributable to ocean conditions such as changes in temperature, currents or food competition."
http://www.alaskastar.com/Alaska-Star/November-Issue-1-2013/Statewide-ki...
-------------------------------------------
"Tom Vania, Fish and Game’s regional fisheries management coordinator for Cook Inlet, says the new restrictions this year shouldn’t surprise people, noting that only four of 17 Cook Inlet-area streams met their state escapement goals in 2012."
http://articles.ktuu.com/2013-04-18/king-salmon_38654874
-----------------------------------------------
"We're in a period of low abundance and low returns, statewide, and whether it's from Southeast, Copper River, Cook Inlet, Kodiak, Nushagak, Yukon, we're just in this period of low productivity in the ocean," said Ricky Gease, a biologist and director of the Kenai River Sportfishing Association. Biologist Tom Vania, the Cook Inlet regional coordinator for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, said the widespread failures of king salmon returns indicate the problem isn't freshwater-based, such as not enough adult spawners in the prior generation, or a loss of eggs from some kind of river catastrophe."
http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2012/06/24/153591/decline-in-king-salmon-is-r...
--------------------------------------
Decline in king salmon is rooted in the sea, state biologists say. What ever's plaguing state's salmon isn't in the rivers, experts say.
http://www.adn.com/2012/06/23/2517571/decline-in-king-salmon-is-rooted.h...
http://www.adn.com/2012/06/23/2517571/decline-in-king-salmon-is-rooted.html
------------------------------
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Poor king salmon returns have state biologists limiting fishing throughout Alaska and biologists have their eyes on the ocean as the problem.
http://washingtonexaminer.com/biologists-alaska-king-salmon-woes-tied-to...
-----------------------------------
ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Something in the ocean has been death to Alaska's king salmon. Decline in king salmon is rooted in the sea, Alaska state biologists say.
http://tdn.com/lifestyles/decline-in-king-salmon-is-rooted-in-the-sea-al...

kenai123
1322
Points
kenai123 11/21/13 - 03:15 pm
1
3
So Everyone Is Wrong and Peter E. Cannava Is Right?

Wow Peter you sure have a lot of claims regarding our sport fish guides. I will attempt address each of them.

You desire limits for guides? Unfortunately these guides are common users and they cannot be limited like commercial fisheries. You should have known this, after all you are in the business.

You claim guides are commercial? The legal definition of a sport fish guide in Alaska is a person which assists an angler in catching a fish. The legal definition of a commercial fisherman is a fisherman who catches and then directly sells a fish. Guides do not directly catch or sell fish, therefore they are specifically not classified by our legal system as commercial. You should have known this, after all you are in the business

You claim guides adversely affect the quality of life on the Kenai River? Each person who attempts to fish the Kenai River or Cook Inlet adversely affects the quality of life on the Kenai River, by either increasing or decreasing the amount of fish available for others to try to catch. Guides are common users and all common users are guaranteed EQUAL fisheries access by our constitution if a fisheries surplus is available. Both set netters and anglers adversely affects the quality of life on the Kenai River so if you want to rid the world of "adversity" on this issue I guess you would have to be in favor of removing both set netters and guides but you are not so you are illogical.

You claim people have stopped fishing the Kenai River for overcrowding? You are completely incorrect in this claim, these people stopped fishing the Kenai River because it takes them hundreds of hours of fishing to catch a single king salmon. The reasons for the effort increase are many but I can assure you that they would be fishing if they thought that they stood a good chance of catching a king salmon. You would know this if you fished the Kenai River much.

You claim excessive guide boat wakes? There is zero scientific information out there to support the claim that boat wakes equal a problem. There is substantial science out there which shows that river erosion equals additional spawning beds and therefore a positive factor. You would know this if you had been fishing the Kenai River for the past 30 years

You claim the kings killed by Kenai River boats are staggering? This is basically a meaningless claim because it is subjective to what an individual believes to be "staggering and non-staggering". Lacking a "staggering" definition, no person knows what you mean. You should have know this to be a meaningless claim and not generated it unless you wish to define the term.

You claim each boat kills two kings per day, 800 per day, 4,000 per week, 24,000 per year? Theses are the obvious ravings of a mad man who does not fish the Kenai River. Even back in the Kenai River hay-day 1985 -1995 we did not see every boat killing two kings per day. Now with many days showing 500 boats fishing an eight hour day and killing maybe a dozen kings, it is completely mindless and ill-responsible typing.

You claim a hotel owner kills 12 kings per day, 60 each week? Again ill-responsible calculations because there are no hotels killing these numbers of kings on the Kenai River, I know, I am out there everyday during the summer and no single business is doing this. You would also know better if you were out there everyday on the Kenai River.

You claim if each guide boat had 4 anglers x 400 boat makes 1,600 hooks dragging the river per day, an eight hour day gets 12,800 hook hours per day? First of all have you been watching the boat loads on the Kenai River lately, most of these boats are not carrying 4 anglers anymore because few people can expect to catch a king. Incorrect calculations again. And also if there are no kings in the Kenai River what difference does it make how many hooks are fishing the river? Really? A more important question would be the number of commercial nets fishing Cook Inlet? There are over 7 million liner feet of gill nets fishing the inlet during the average commercial fishing period. Hooks can be dodged or not bit but gill nets are instant death for anything that moves. Why would you be so concerned with zillions of hooks fishing fish-less water and so non-concerned with 7 million liner feet of guaranteed fish killing tackle? Gee I wonder?

You claim guides need to be limited like set netters? You claim guide numbers need to be reduced? You should know that guides are common users and as such are guaranteed equal fisheries access by our state constitution. You should know this is why guides have not had their numbers limited because it has been attempted many many times by person like yourself. You would know this if you spend anytime researching the facts before typing.

You claim kings should have a trophy designation with a permit to kill one? Well now you have stumbled onto something which I agree with you on. I agree we should have a trophy designation on kings and we should force ANYONE who kills one to have a permit to do so. This permit would be required for ANYONE to kill a king, set netter or angler alike. I am sure you would be all for that right?

Approximately 99% of your published claims are incorrect and demonstrate a general lack of understanding regarding our king salmon resource or the users who are attempting to access our fisheries. I suggest that you put in a little more time researching your ideas before publishing them.

The truth is that the actual science out there has confirmed that our STATEWIDE king salmon problems have their origins within the saltwater and not the freshwater, the evidence is over-whelming. Robert Begich believes it, Tom Vania believes it, Ray Beamesderfe believes it, Ricky Gease believes it and Kevin Delaney believes it. Are you attempting to declare that all these people are wrong and that you are right?

pengy
258
Points
pengy 11/22/13 - 06:26 am
0
2
Kenai123, I pointed out that

Kenai123,

I pointed out that all user groups would have to be reduced if the author wanted to affect the overall traffic on the river. You and I know this will never happen and that was my way of saying that reducing guide numbers is not a solution to correcting an ocean issue. Carry on.

Carver
1195
Points
Carver 11/22/13 - 06:34 am
2
0
Not even wrong . . .

"Please listen up, the Kenai River DOES NOT possesses some kind of special magical local king salmon problem."
******************

Oh, yes it does.

While the overall decline in chinook numbers is a state-wide phenomenon, the decline in the size of Kenai kings is not.

The selective targeting and harvest and the stress of C&R over and over again is successfully killing the goose (fish) that laid the golden egg for the commercial, in-river fishery.

Call your local ADF&G office . . they can explain it to you.

kenai123
1322
Points
kenai123 11/23/13 - 01:36 am
1
2
Carver, gill nets kill more larger kings than smaller ones.

Carver, so if you fail to locate facts which support your warped Kenai River perspective, you just make them up? We all know well that gill nets also kill more large kings than smaller ones because larger males have "dog-fanged teeth" which further prevent their escape like smaller kings. So if you have anglers and gill netters both killing higher percentages of larger kings, how would you be able to determine which factor was more significant? The response is simple, YOU DON'T. You just go around telling people that you somehow just magically know. In your case you also just happen to either not know or don't care to know that gill nets kill more large kings than smaller ones.

So where is the official ADF&G study proving your claim of missing large kings on the Kenai River and then the data which proves that gill nets could not of killed them? We both know that no such study exists because many local and non-local factors could have killed those larger kings. You are proclaiming your personal opinion on this issue and hoping that the general public will just take your word for it. NOTE, Please spare us regarding your religious belief that only anglers fish first runs because Kodiak gill nets also begin in the first week of June just like anglers. Every king headed to the Kenai River must also evade Kodiak gill nets.

So the next time you decide to just line up for your usual broad-side Kenai River attack, try posting some actual evidence, links or anything with a little bit of actual research behind it before typing.

It is always personally amazing to me to see the same people attempt to attack users over and over who are only able to impact a run by a factor of 5 - 10%, while ignoring the users who are able to impact a run by 80 - 90%. I wonder why they do this? Attack the minor player while ignoring the major player... Does anyone know why?

Carver
1195
Points
Carver 11/23/13 - 09:11 am
3
0
Fabricated nonsense and fairy tales . . .

". . gill nets also kill more large kings than smaller ones . . gill nets kill more large kings than smaller ones. . no such study exists . . spare us regarding your religious belief . . your usual broad-side Kenai River attack . . ignoring the users who are able to impact a run by 80 - 90%. . ."
********************

Not even wrong . . here you go:

Soldotna ADF&G—262-9368

Give 'em a call . . they'll set you straight.

Seafarer
1147
Points
Seafarer 11/23/13 - 02:21 pm
2
0
Well Said & Right On The Money!

Peter's math does not lie. The single most detrimental issue on the Kenai is the huge number of guides. There are so many, it's a wonder there aren't more collisions!

Reduce the guides by more than half or limit their participation by guides A-H guide one day, while guides I-Z the next. Or do a limited entry cull. Either way, too many guides are the bane and will be the ruin of the Kenai River. Hands down. True story. Mark my words.

kenai123
1322
Points
kenai123 11/24/13 - 09:19 pm
1
2
no nonsense, no fabrications and no fairy tales.

Carver, you don't like my "gill nets are killing all our big kings projection? Very well, I have my own personal gill net impact study for you. My study will be simple as we will catch ten
60 pound male kings and ten 20 pound male kings. Then we will frame a 3X3 piece of standard gill net and release each king by initially pushing its head into the mesh the same amount. Then we will officially record which kings break free and which die in the mesh. I am willing to bet you any amount of money that more big kings die in the mesh than small kings. This is a real life wager, no nonsense, no fabrications and no fairy tales.

I personally know than no gill netter on this earth would take any part in this wager because they all know very well in their hearts what would in fact result and the ADF&G would not be able to help them. So either put up or shut up Carver.

kenai123
1322
Points
kenai123 11/24/13 - 10:25 pm
1
2
Seafarer, Peter and your math are both incorrect.

First of all both of you are incorrect regarding Kenai River guides. There were only about 300 guides on the Kenai River in 2012. 1995 was the last time we had only 300 guides on the Kenai. Those numbers will be close to 150 - 200 by 2014. So neither of you know what you are talking about. Welcome to reality...
http://www2.borough.kenai.ak.us/Econ/1S_P%20data/VisitorIndustry/KenaiRi...

Secondly if an elbow-room issue really exists on the Kenai River, it would have nothing to do with the people who operate the boats like guides. Guides have no official access to the Kenai River because they cannot fish, they only provide transportation to anglers who desire to fish the river. To allege that the boat driver is a problem but the angler in his boat is not, is absolutely insane. To prove my point what would you say if guides drove their boats around the Kenai River without anglers? We all know there would be no use, no impact and no issue, right? So I have proved that you in fact do not have a problem with guides, you in fact have a problem with the anglers in their boats.

Why would anyone who has a problem with anglers, instead claim that they have a problem with the guides driving the boat? This is the equivalent of thinking that way too many people are using the bus but you don't say that, instead you claim that there are to many bus drivers. Why would anyone do that? Why would you desire to reduce bus drivers instead of their passengers? If you reduce bus drivers, you then reduce bus traffic, if you reduce bus traffic each potential passenger would then need to drive their own car thus increasing the possible congested situation. Why would you want to increase the congestion situation when you claim that your plan helps that situation? Is anyone starting to see the smoke and mirrors going on here? These are fake issues to run anglers around in circles while commercial fisheries catch all their fish.

So how does Peter's math not lie Seafarer? Less guides like less bus drivers, mean more congestion. Limited Entry? Obviously you have not been paying attention. In order to qualify for limited entry you must both catch and sell a fish, commercial fishing only, so common user like guides or anglers do not qualify for your limited entry.

The way I see it Seafarer and Peter, you guys really need to give it a rest and try doing a little more fisheries research before typing.

beaverlooper
3242
Points
beaverlooper 11/25/13 - 10:06 am
1
0
guides are not common users

Guides are no more common users than pilots that fly for Alaska Air,Delta ,ERA or any of the other airlines.those guys are called commercial airline pilots.The people you take out are the common users. You get paid to do a particular service,that's called commerce.Do you not have to buy a commercial license to take people out?

borninak
681
Points
borninak 11/25/13 - 10:27 am
1
0
Do You Have A Business License?

Are you required to have a Business License in Alaska if you are going to be in the Guiding Business? You have to be delusional to take people's money for your services, buy a state business license, pay the borough taxes and insist that you are not commercial. Does the IRS know about your non-commercial business activities? Are you taking advantage of any business write offs, like say your fuel, boat depreciation, fishing gear? As usual, the spin never stops. Before you waste your time, do a little more research and less typing.

Beach Boss
124
Points
Beach Boss 11/25/13 - 10:56 pm
1
0
Kenai123

Kenai123 you are so wrong. ESSN target sockeye with the mesh size they use. Therefore they harvest a majority of the kings are smaller jacks. In fact 70% of our catch this season were 1.1 and 1.2 king salmon. How about you take a little bit of your own advice and call ADF&G and fact check that piece. Oh what you did and it didn't support your position of ESSN are the cause of everything wrong in the inlet??

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