Realizing a dream

The Clarion reported some wonderful news this week, that Central Peninsula Habitat for Humanity is nearing completion of its 18th home. The organization is shooting to have new homeowner Elaine Cunningham moved in for the holidays.

Central Peninsula Habitat for Humanity is affiliated with Habitat for Humanity International, a non-profit organization that provides opportunities for home ownership for low-income families. Recipients of a Habitat home must be in need of safe living arrangements; have a sustainable income and be able to make monthly payments on a no-interest mortgage; and contribute 500 hours of “sweat equity” to the home building process.

Cunningham was certainly in need of safe housing. She and her son lost their home to a suspected electrical fire. From there, they moved to the basement of a house that was foreclosed upon, and wound up in small trailer. She told the Clarion that owning her own home is “a dream come true.”

Unfortunately, there remains a need for safe, affordable housing for many residents of the Kenai Peninsula. Cunningham’s story is not uncommon. There are many families who, for one reason or another, find themselves in similar living situations. Some bounce from place to place, crashing with friends or family or staying in someone’s basement. Others find themselves living in structures that are unsafe, either because of their construction or location.

We’re grateful to have organizations like Habitat for Humanity — and its volunteers and contributors — helping to make dreams come true in our community.

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Op-ed: Trump won the news conference

Donald Trump should do press conferences more often. Not for the country’s sake, certainly not for the media’s sake, but for his. He really shouldn’t have waited 167-plus days to hold one, because the man gives great sound bite. Although I’ve participated in probably thousands of these staged encounters as a reporter, they’re not my favorite way of getting news — you almost never get any. The guy at the podium controls the proceeding. He can get his message out with little challenge from the assembled journalists who are limited to a question and a follow-up, maybe. Politicians can bob and weave through that without any of us landing a blow. And that’s our job: to penetrate the canned responses to their version of the controversy du jour and get at whatever truth they are hiding. Besides, Trump — who uses contempt for the media as a weapon, his preferred way to discredit reporting that displeases him —has a wonderful forum to do that. At the very least he should hold these confrontations as a supplement to his Twitter tirades. And frequently. It’s his opportunity to hold the media hostage as they cover live his rain of abuse on them.

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Good luck in Juneau

The 30th Alaska Legislature gavels in on Tuesday, and we’d like to take a moment to wish our Kenai Peninsula legislators good luck over the coming months in Juneau.

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Ready to weather the storm

If there’s a bright spot in the recent headlines regarding Alaska’s economy, it’s this: on the Kenai Peninsula, the bad news isn’t nearly as bad as it could be.

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Letters to the editor

Chuitna mine threatens Alaska way of life

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