Courtesy, patience go a long way on Peninsula roads

Winter’s grip is receding around the central Kenai Peninsula, which means it’s time for that other season we have here in Alaska — construction.

For Peninsula drivers, that means it’s time to take a deep breath, because it very well might take a few extra minutes to get where you’re going from now until things freeze up again next fall.

There are a number of road projects slated for this summer across the Kenai Peninsula — some already under way. Remember to use caution in construction zones and follow flaggers’ directions. They are there for a reason — to keep drivers and construction workers safe.

For up to date information about road conditions and construction delays, check 511.alaska.gov before heading out.

While we’re on the topic of roads, now is a good time for a reminder that we’re about to start sharing our roads with a whole lot more users.

In addition to the visitors who will start flocking to the Peninsula in the coming weeks, there are plenty of other people getting out on what are quickly becoming ice-free roads. Motorcyclists who have been itching for a ride are revving up their machines. Bicycling continues to grow in popularity, both as a mode of transportation for the daily commute and as a way to get some exercise. Runners and walkers are emerging from winter hibernation, and many will have kids or pets in tow.

Indeed, summer driving on Peninsula roads requires just as much caution and attention as winter driving, if not more so.

We wish safe travels to everyone this spring and summer. Whether you’re traveling by motor vehicle or human power, learn and follow the rules of the road. Remember, a little courtesy and patience go a long way in making sure everybody gets where they’re going.

More

Op-ed: Trump won the news conference

Donald Trump should do press conferences more often. Not for the country’s sake, certainly not for the media’s sake, but for his. He really shouldn’t have waited 167-plus days to hold one, because the man gives great sound bite. Although I’ve participated in probably thousands of these staged encounters as a reporter, they’re not my favorite way of getting news — you almost never get any. The guy at the podium controls the proceeding. He can get his message out with little challenge from the assembled journalists who are limited to a question and a follow-up, maybe. Politicians can bob and weave through that without any of us landing a blow. And that’s our job: to penetrate the canned responses to their version of the controversy du jour and get at whatever truth they are hiding. Besides, Trump — who uses contempt for the media as a weapon, his preferred way to discredit reporting that displeases him —has a wonderful forum to do that. At the very least he should hold these confrontations as a supplement to his Twitter tirades. And frequently. It’s his opportunity to hold the media hostage as they cover live his rain of abuse on them.

Read more

Good luck in Juneau

The 30th Alaska Legislature gavels in on Tuesday, and we’d like to take a moment to wish our Kenai Peninsula legislators good luck over the coming months in Juneau.

Read more

Ready to weather the storm

If there’s a bright spot in the recent headlines regarding Alaska’s economy, it’s this: on the Kenai Peninsula, the bad news isn’t nearly as bad as it could be.

Read more

Letters to the editor

Chuitna mine threatens Alaska way of life

Read more