Letter to the editor: More cooperation could heal divides

Abortion, and guns: the two most divisive topics in politics. Our current political climate is, to say the least, divided. But I’d like to propose a reconciling: instead of vilifying the “other” and embracing our politicians voting solely on party lines, what if we shift our focus to cooperation, compromise, and respectful conversation?

 

Our officials in Washington spend a disturbing amount of time meeting with lobbyists. The time not spent with lobbyists, they’re campaigning to get re-elected. This leaves little time to actually represent us. Which, as we’re electing them, should be the priority.

Despite political affiliations, the majority of Americans likely fall in the 95th percentile on a bell curve. This means that our similarities far outweigh our differences (minus extremist outliers). Yet we’re so busy pitting Blue against Red that we’ve become unconcerned that politicians receive big money from lobbyists, and cooperation across the aisle isn’t encouraged, much less the norm.

We, as a nation, would benefit far more from embracing difference of opinion, and having respectful conversation to reach a happy medium. These problems in Washington will not be solved overnight, but change starts with us realizing that we have more to lose divided than united, and big money has no place in our republic.

Lauren Jerew

Homer

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