Pike-killing toxin a concern for humans

Your recent article on Stormy Lake and the pike “infestation” (Peninsula Clarion, May 27) bears correction. (I did attend one of the meetings regarding Stormy Lake.)

The use of the toxin, rotenone, was presented as a means of killing the pike in Stormy Lake. In your article, rotenone was cited as being “non-toxic to mammals and birds” and not a threat.” To the contrary, rotenone is used to introduce Parkinson’s disease in lab animals. Undetectable amounts were found to cause symptoms of this disease.

The dosage to cause Parkinson’s disease in humans is not known. (Obviously, a human study to determine dosage could not be undertaken.) A 2010 study from NIH lists rotenone as being positively associated with the mechanics of Parkinson’s disease and the EPA voiced its concern for the residues or rotenone in cold water. What happens to the loons, the ducks, the moose?

A foreign product (pike) was introduced into Stormy Lake. Now, should another foreign product (the toxin, rotenone) be introduced?

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