King salmon managment history needs to be examined

2012 is a sad year for the Kenai Peninsula, both for the residents and the tourists, ie, few king salmon in the streams and rumors of mushy halibut in Cook Inlet will dramatically impact its economy. And all the second guessers are having a field day -- how could this catastrophe happen? Regarding ocean trawlers, the only incentive to reduce bycatch is to make bycatch part of the catch quota, with no catch high-grading allowed. Regarding king salmon river fishing: 1) The fisheries must be bank fishing or driftboat-fishing-only, with no anchoring or anchor dragging allowed! 2) Known in-river spawning beds should be closed. 3) Catch-and-release should stop. Stiff penalties must be imposed for violations and necessary law enforcement personnel added.

Sounds harsh, doesn't it? This event has been a long time coming! I recall the first Kenai River imposed-catch-and-release was circa 1989, with more since (and ever smaller fish) -- all indicators of a diminishing fishery, which no one would admit. There are too many managers of the ocean and Peninsula fisheries, and nobody is in charge! Serious change is required or the fisheries will disappear! Question: Why does one choose to disbelieve history?

More

Support the University of Alaska

It is time to speak up to support the University of Alaska. By 2025, 65 percent of the jobs in Alaska... Read more

Funding education is an obligation

I’m writing you all to express my concern over the proposed cuts to our education. I consider education to be our obligation to our youth.... Read more

Book sale proceeds benefit Kenai library, community

“Let us tenderly and kindly cherish, therefore, the means of knowledge. Let us dare to read, think, speak, and write.” –... Read more

Marijuana the safest of the vices

This article is mainly for Christians who adamantly oppose marijuana as I once did. Read more

Around the Web