More to fishery issues than natural cycles

Our ADF&G is going to be needing lots of emergency orders for the future as they have commercially wiped-out our marine prey for juvenal king salmon. Ocean juvenal king prey has been reduced by 98 percent by commercial crab fisheries, therefore it is very likely that our kings are starving to death. Our ADF&G should know this but they do not. The ADF&G can only shout “It’s natural low abundance!” There is a low abundance of prey for our juvenal kings but it’s not natural, it’s ADF”&G caused by excess commercial fishing for herring and crab along with excess commercial by-catch on adult kings.

1950 lower 48 east coast commercial fisheries caught so many cod that they caused their cod fisheries collapse by 1970. 1930 depression era farmers plowed up the grassy prairies but caused The Great Dust Bowl. World War II era dam builders produced cheap electricity but killed most of their salmon. The lower 48 west coast timber industry cut so many trees that they eroded and silted their river thus killing most of their salmon. 1990 lower 48 west coast commercial salmon fisheries caught so many salmon that they help cause their salmon fisheries collapse by 2000. Before 1980 Florida had a massive tarpon resource but they allowed excess commercial harvest of tarpon prey like blue crab, pink shrimp and toadfish, thus causing their tarpon to collapse by 1990. Many claimed these losses were the result of “a natural cycle.” Excess commercial harvest has depleted Alaska’s herring, crab and now king salmon resources. Our ADF&G is claiming “a natural low abundance” but we are compelled to ask if this is in fact “a natural cycle” or the direct results of the same excessive commercial activities and mis-management which has plagued our past?

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