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Letters to the Editor

Posted: Tuesday, January 07, 2003

Casey Porter trying to turn life around; his death was unnecessary

I think that the headline for the article about Casey Porter was false -- "Man shot trying to run over trooper."

That is the most untrue statement and should not have been the headline. I personally knew Casey Porter, not for very long, but I did know him. I met Casey just a few days before his tragic death and would like everyone who reads this to know the real Casey Porter.

About a year ago Casey was in a bad accident, which broke his neck and back. The doctors said he would never walk again. After recovering he proved the doctors wrong by being able to walk with the use of a cane. The doctors considered him a paraplegic.

A day before his death,Casey was at our home talking about how he did have jail time ahead of him and he was prepared to do his time, and how he wanted to turn his life around and become a better person. He knew he could do it, now he can't. Casey wasn't the type of person to be scared of, he was very nice and caring. He could light up a room with his caring eyes and joyful smile.

I don't think the trooper should have shot Casey. I could understand shooting a tire out, but not a human being. I hope the trooper who did that to him realizes he killed an innocent person. Instead of jumping out of the way, he shot and killed a person who enjoyed life, who lived it to every moment.

In the paper it says that the troopers repeatedly asked Casey to step out of the car and asked him several times to keep his hands on the wheel. Any person who knew Casey knew he had a hard time getting around anywhere he went. It was not easy for him to do anything simple, it was always a big job for him.

Casey wasn't a bad person at all. He had his ups and downs with the law, but that doesn't make him a bad person. I think Casey Porter's death could have been prevented, and I hope the trooper who did it feels terrible. I hope you feel incredibly horrible and ashamed but most of all sympathetic to the family and friends who you have hurt by his death.

Jacquelyn Church , Kenai

Two wrongs result in man's death; trooper perverted justice

In response to Sunday's front page article, "Man shot trying to run over trooper": Only a trooper on drugs would put his body between a running "suspicious vehicle" and his own trooper car. If in fact this trooper takes drugs while on duty, he ought to work in the office and not carry a gun or operate machinery (trooper car).

It's a shame Casey Porter didn't comply with troopers. No matter how terrible of a criminal he may have been, he was (is) forgivable. Either way, the trooper who fired the fatal shot, used the law on his own behalf to pervert justice.

This poor-minded trooper who murdered Casey Porter should stop and think about life and forgiveness.

Robert L. Correia, Kasilof

Observations on Iditarod Trail and its use on Kenai Peninsula

The Dec. 29 Clarion tells us salvation has come to the Iditarod Trail. It seems government is investing to preserve an old link between Seward and Nome. I was surprised to learn that this trail was 5,000 years old.

Kenai Peninsula residents are probably most interested in the part of the trail on the peninsula. In her books, Mary Barry (who seems to know more than the average bear) tells how Seward started. The Russian American Company had a trading post there for a few years, but it was abandoned before the Russians sold out. Just before 1900, prospectors came. Some of these prospectors used the mountain passes to Turnagain Arm.

In "Transportation in Alaska's Past," Robert Spude reports that in 1908 the Army's Alaska Road Commission established the trail which later became known as the Iditarod. Working for the commission with a detachment of three men, Walter Goodwin blazed the trail from Seward to Nome.

Before 1900 neither Nome nor Seward existed. So why does a 5,000-year-old trail run between nonexistent places?

We might note that the Iditarod and the railroad take the same course from Seward to Girdwood. The railroad sputtered until it finally reached Anchorage in 1918. After that date most of the Kenai Peninsula portion of the Iditarod Trail was a choo-choo train. North of Girdwood, the trail existed but competing with trains must have been rough going.

The famous January 1925 serum run began at the Anchorage Railroad Hospital and went by train to Nenana. From there, dogs followed the Tanana and Yukon rivers to the Kaltag Portage. At Kaltag, the serum run must have joined the Iditarod Trail.

To sum up, we have a sum of government money to preserve some trail. The majority of the Kenai Peninsula portion of this trail was used for maybe 20 of the last 100 years. Prior to that the trail was never used as a unit, but the use of portions of it goes way back.

Brent Johnson, Clam Gulch

Casey Porter trying to turn life around; his death was unnecessary

I think that the headline for the article about Casey Porter was false -- "Man shot trying to run over trooper."

That is the most untrue statement and should not have been the headline. I personally knew Casey Porter, not for very long, but I did know him. I met Casey just a few days before his tragic death and would like everyone who reads this to know the real Casey Porter.

About a year ago Casey was in a bad accident, which broke his neck and back. The doctors said he would never walk again. After recovering he proved the doctors wrong by being able to walk with the use of a cane. The doctors considered him a paraplegic.

A day before his death,Casey was at our home talking about how he did have jail time ahead of him and he was prepared to do his time, and how he wanted to turn his life around and become a better person. He knew he could do it, now he can't. Casey wasn't the type of person to be scared of, he was very nice and caring. He could light up a room with his caring eyes and joyful smile.

I don't think the trooper should have shot Casey. I could understand shooting a tire out, but not a human being. I hope the trooper who did that to him realizes he killed an innocent person. Instead of jumping out of the way, he shot and killed a person who enjoyed life, who lived it to every moment.

In the paper it says that the troopers repeatedly asked Casey to step out of the car and asked him several times to keep his hands on the wheel. Any person who knew Casey knew he had a hard time getting around anywhere he went. It was not easy for him to do anything simple, it was always a big job for him.

Casey wasn't a bad person at all. He had his ups and downs with the law, but that doesn't make him a bad person. I think Casey Porter's death could have been prevented, and I hope the trooper who did it feels terrible. I hope you feel incredibly horrible and ashamed but most of all sympathetic to the family and friends who you have hurt by his death.

Jacquelyn Church , Kenai

Two wrongs result in man's death; trooper perverted justice

In response to Sunday's front page article, "Man shot trying to run over trooper": Only a trooper on drugs would put his body between a running "suspicious vehicle" and his own trooper car. If in fact this trooper takes drugs while on duty, he ought to work in the office and not carry a gun or operate machinery (trooper car).

It's a shame Casey Porter didn't comply with troopers. No matter how terrible of a criminal he may have been, he was (is) forgivable. Either way, the trooper who fired the fatal shot, used the law on his own behalf to pervert justice.

This poor-minded trooper who murdered Casey Porter should stop and think about life and forgiveness.

Robert L. Correia, Kasilof

Observations on Iditarod Trail and its use on Kenai Peninsula

The Dec. 29 Clarion tells us salvation has come to the Iditarod Trail. It seems government is investing to preserve an old link between Seward and Nome. I was surprised to learn that this trail was 5,000 years old.

Kenai Peninsula residents are probably most interested in the part of the trail on the peninsula. In her books, Mary Barry (who seems to know more than the average bear) tells how Seward started. The Russian American Company had a trading post there for a few years, but it was abandoned before the Russians sold out. Just before 1900, prospectors came. Some of these prospectors used the mountain passes to Turnagain Arm.

In "Transportation in Alaska's Past," Robert Spude reports that in 1908 the Army's Alaska Road Commission established the trail which later became known as the Iditarod. Working for the commission with a detachment of three men, Walter Goodwin blazed the trail from Seward to Nome.

Before 1900 neither Nome nor Seward existed. So why does a 5,000-year-old trail run between nonexistent places?

We might note that the Iditarod and the railroad take the same course from Seward to Girdwood. The railroad sputtered until it finally reached Anchorage in 1918. After that date most of the Kenai Peninsula portion of the Iditarod Trail was a choo-choo train. North of Girdwood, the trail existed but competing with trains must have been rough going.

The famous January 1925 serum run began at the Anchorage Railroad Hospital and went by train to Nenana. From there, dogs followed the Tanana and Yukon rivers to the Kaltag Portage. At Kaltag, the serum run must have joined the Iditarod Trail.

To sum up, we have a sum of government money to preserve some trail. The majority of the Kenai Peninsula portion of this trail was used for maybe 20 of the last 100 years. Prior to that the trail was never used as a unit, but the use of portions of it goes way back.

Brent Johnson, Clam Gulch

HEAD: Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

Casey Porter trying to turn life around; his death was unnecessary

I think that the headline for the article about Casey Porter was false -- "Man shot trying to run over trooper."

That is the most untrue statement and should not have been the headline. I personally knew Casey Porter, not for very long, but I did know him. I met Casey just a few days before his tragic death and would like everyone who reads this to know the real Casey Porter.

About a year ago Casey was in a bad accident, which broke his neck and back. The doctors said he would never walk again. After recovering he proved the doctors wrong by being able to walk with the use of a cane. The doctors considered him a paraplegic.

A day before his death,Casey was at our home talking about how he did have jail time ahead of him and he was prepared to do his time, and how he wanted to turn his life around and become a better person. He knew he could do it, now he can't. Casey wasn't the type of person to be scared of, he was very nice and caring. He could light up a room with his caring eyes and joyful smile.

I don't think the trooper should have shot Casey. I could understand shooting a tire out, but not a human being. I hope the trooper who did that to him realizes he killed an innocent person. Instead of jumping out of the way, he shot and killed a person who enjoyed life, who lived it to every moment.

In the paper it says that the troopers repeatedly asked Casey to step out of the car and asked him several times to keep his hands on the wheel. Any person who knew Casey knew he had a hard time getting around anywhere he went. It was not easy for him to do anything simple, it was always a big job for him.

Casey wasn't a bad person at all. He had his ups and downs with the law, but that doesn't make him a bad person. I think Casey Porter's death could have been prevented, and I hope the trooper who did it feels terrible. I hope you feel incredibly horrible and ashamed but most of all sympathetic to the family and friends who you have hurt by his death.

Jacquelyn Church , Kenai

Two wrongs result in man's death; trooper perverted justice

In response to Sunday's front page article, "Man shot trying to run over trooper": Only a trooper on drugs would put his body between a running "suspicious vehicle" and his own trooper car. If in fact this trooper takes drugs while on duty, he ought to work in the office and not carry a gun or operate machinery (trooper car).

It's a shame Casey Porter didn't comply with troopers. No matter how terrible of a criminal he may have been, he was (is) forgivable. Either way, the trooper who fired the fatal shot, used the law on his own behalf to pervert justice.

This poor-minded trooper who murdered Casey Porter should stop and think about life and forgiveness.

Robert L. Correia, Kasilof

Observations on Iditarod Trail and its use on Kenai Peninsula

The Dec. 29 Clarion tells us salvation has come to the Iditarod Trail. It seems government is investing to preserve an old link between Seward and Nome. I was surprised to learn that this trail was 5,000 years old.

Kenai Peninsula residents are probably most interested in the part of the trail on the peninsula. In her books, Mary Barry (who seems to know more than the average bear) tells how Seward started. The Russian American Company had a trading post there for a few years, but it was abandoned before the Russians sold out. Just before 1900, prospectors came. Some of these prospectors used the mountain passes to Turnagain Arm.

In "Transportation in Alaska's Past," Robert Spude reports that in 1908 the Army's Alaska Road Commission established the trail which later became known as the Iditarod. Working for the commission with a detachment of three men, Walter Goodwin blazed the trail from Seward to Nome.

Before 1900 neither Nome nor Seward existed. So why does a 5,000-year-old trail run between nonexistent places?

We might note that the Iditarod and the railroad take the same course from Seward to Girdwood. The railroad sputtered until it finally reached Anchorage in 1918. After that date most of the Kenai Peninsula portion of the Iditarod Trail was a choo-choo train. North of Girdwood, the trail existed but competing with trains must have been rough going.

The famous January 1925 serum run began at the Anchorage Railroad Hospital and went by train to Nenana. From there, dogs followed the Tanana and Yukon rivers to the Kaltag Portage. At Kaltag, the serum run must have joined the Iditarod Trail.

To sum up, we have a sum of government money to preserve some trail. The majority of the Kenai Peninsula portion of this trail was used for maybe 20 of the last 100 years. Prior to that the trail was never used as a unit, but the use of portions of it goes way back.

Brent Johnson, Clam Gulch



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