Letters to the Editor

Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2001

Big corporations don't realize how they hurt small businesses

I am very concerned about the recent invasion of corporations. These big companies have no idea what they are doing. These people sit in their offices in the states and think they have some sort of clue about what it is like in Alaska, especially Soldotna.

We don't need any more gas stations anymore than we need another stop light.

My family and I have operated a gas station for almost 13 years. A place where we have a strong return customer base. We enjoy what we do. We are one of the little guys. We are not corporate. We are just people trying to make our way through this world.

When companies come in and make it hard for us, they make it hard for everyone. We rarely shop at Fred Meyer's anymore because of their gas pumps. I know now how the campgrounds felt when Freddy's offered free, long-term parking to motor homes. They just don't care who they step on to make a buck.

And now, if Safeway starts in selling gas, no one will make a cent. It is not a matter of demand for supply. It is a matter of over running the community with a service that is already supplied.

I urge the community to shop as much as possible with the independent places. And ask yourself how would Safeway and Freddy's feel about another supermarket in Soldotna -- one that would undercut them and make them lose money. They will never understand the hurt of watching what we as private business owners have worked so hard to build, slowly crumble as a corporate big wig makes a killing in a small town.

Valerie Flake

Short Stop (K-Beach Road)

Soldotna

Coalition would divide fish without regard to Alaska law

Has anyone taken a good look at the Kenai Peninsula Resource Management Coalition mission statement? Well, I read it and I could not believe any responsible organization would put out such an outrageous, self-serving goal statement.

The KPRMC appears to have two main goals. The first appears to be to generate as much new hatred and strife as possible between common users. The second attempts to rebuild long-forgotten hatred and strife between common users. The KPRMC attempts to build this beautiful house of pain by targeting an individual common user and discriminating against it with regard to state natural resources.

The KPRMC believes that recreational common users are somehow inferior to all other forms of natural resource usage. The KPRMC desires to violate the Alaska Constitution by placing a closed fishery in front of an open fishery. It attempts this by desiring a commercial fishing allocation priority over recreational fishing.

Open fisheries like subsistence and recreational fisheries are constitutionally guaranteed professional and recreational resource access. Closed fisheries like commercial fisheries have no constitutional guarantee to resource access (Owsichek v. Alaska, 1988).

Limited entry fisheries are constitutionally designed to utilize surplus fishery stocks not needed by open public fisheries (McDowell v. Alaska).

The KPRMC has totally ignored this legal requirement and demands a limited entry priority over a recreational common user. This goal by itself shows that the organization has no respect for the Alaska Constitution, Legislature or the Supreme Court. KPRMC's goals seem to center on eagerly stacking every user group it can find directly in front of the resident recreational common user and then banishing nonresidents and even nonlocal residents to a far, far away land.

The KPRMC is not dealing with legal realities. Attempting to resolve long-term allocation disputes by ignoring Alaska law is not a viable method of problem solving. This organization needs to take a step back from self-serving mission statements and rethink its entire approach to the resource allocation issue.

Don Johnson

Soldotna

Earnings from permanent fund should pay for college education

I am writing on a matter of deep concern to me regarding education. I suggest you make a name for yourselves by dealing with my suggestions.

The permanent fund makes this state the richest in the union, and I can foresee problems with the federal government helping themselves to some of it someday. I have been advised it cannot, but I do not believe that for one minute.

You must all realize that interest of 5 percent on an investment of $26 billion per year realizes $1.3 billion. The use of interest earned each year alone would enable the state to forgive all outstanding student loan funds and initiate a program where all students choosing to go on to college could have all their expenses paid by the state from now and forever.

There must be rules, of course, to ensure the

education they acquire benefits the state. How this might be worked out I leave to the legislators who are far better equipped to deal with that than I.

I sincerely believe this is the greatest gift you can give to the youngsters of this state, and I believe it will be of great benefit to this state in years to come.

Please give my thoughts some consideration and allow me to remind you that personal education is the only thing someone cannot take from you. Thanks for your time; I am a 75-year-old dreamer.

Edward O. King

Soldotna

Judges earn praise for time

spent on youth essay program

On behalf of the members of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 10046 and its Ladies Auxiliary, we wish to express appreciation to the individuals who willingly donated their time to serve as judges for the VFW-sponsored Youth Essay Program this year. Students in grades seven and eight wrote an essay on the topic "What Does It Mean To Be Patriotic?" The judges read the essays and rated them on how well they addressed the theme, theme development and clarity of ideas.

Sincere thanks to the judges: Suzanne Little, executive director, Boys and Girls Club; Shana Loshbaugh, education reporter, Peninsula Clarion; Kim Mariman, visitor service manager, Soldotna Chamber of Commerce; Bonnie Nichols, director, marketing-public relations, Central Peninsula General Hospital; Terry Rahlfs, store director, Fred Meyer; and Shirley Warner, chief of police, Soldotna.

Thanks also to the parents, teachers, principals and counselors who encouraged and-or assisted the students in preparing their essays and to the staff of the Peninsula Clarion and Dispatch for publicizing and promoting the program. Your support of the Youth Essay Program is greatly appreciated.

Bob Summers, commander

Rachel Jurco, auxiliary president

VFW Post 10046

New school board member looks

forward to challenges of position

I wish to express my appreciation to the people throughout the Kenai Peninsula that supported my bid to the vacant seat on the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District Board of Education. After a three-hour group interview with 11 other interested citizens, all with top-notch qualifications, the board approved my appointment at the Jan. 8 meeting. I will be seated at the Jan. 22 meeting and will serve until the next election on Oct. 2, 2001.

Over the next nine months, I believe my major duty is to communicate. As a board member, I represent the district as a whole although I live in Seward. Our community is excited and appreciative of having a hometown member on the board.

In addition, I look forward to visiting schools and meeting students, parents, educators and community residents throughout the district in our common pursuit of providing top quality education for all of our young people.

I am most accessible by e-mail at swassilie@kpbsd.k12.ak.us. I can also be reached at 224-3950 or P.0. Box 1576, Seward, AK 99664. I look forward to serving our district as I believe our communities are only as strong as our schools are.

Sandy Wassilie

Seward

The Peninsula Clarion welcomes Letters to the Editor. All letters should include the writer's phone number and address. Letters can be faxed to 283-3299 or e-mailed to clarion@alaska.net.

HEAD: Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

Big corporations don't realize

how they hurt small businesses

I am very concerned about the recent invasion of corporations. These big companies have no idea what they are doing. These people sit in their offices in the states and think they have some sort of clue about what it is like in Alaska, especially Soldotna.

We don't need any more gas stations anymore than we need another stop light.

My family and I have operated a gas station for almost 13 years. A place where we have a strong return customer base. We enjoy what we do. We are one of the little guys. We are not corporate. We are just people trying to make our way through this world.

When companies come in and make it hard for us, they make it hard for everyone. We rarely shop at Fred Meyer's anymore because of their gas pumps. I know now how the campgrounds felt when Freddy's offered free, long-term parking to motor homes. They just don't care who they step on to make a buck.

And now, if Safeway starts in selling gas, no one will make a cent. It is not a matter of demand for supply. It is a matter of over running the community with a service that is already supplied.

I urge the community to shop as much as possible with the independent places. And ask yourself how would Safeway and Freddy's feel about another supermarket in Soldotna -- one that would undercut them and make them lose money. They will never understand the hurt of watching what we as private business owners have worked so hard to build, slowly crumble as a corporate big wig makes a killing in a small town.

Valerie Flake

Short Stop (K-Beach Road)

Soldotna

Coalition would divide fish

without regard to Alaska law

Has anyone taken a good look at the Kenai Peninsula Resource Management Coalition mission statement? Well, I read it and I could not believe any responsible organization would put out such an outrageous, self-serving goal statement.

The KPRMC appears to have two main goals. The first appears to be to generate as much new hatred and strife as possible between common users. The second attempts to rebuild long-forgotten hatred and strife between common users. The KPRMC attempts to build this beautiful house of pain by targeting an individual common user and discriminating against it with regard to state natural resources.

The KPRMC believes that recreational common users are somehow inferior to all other forms of natural resource usage. The KPRMC desires to violate the Alaska Constitution by placing a closed fishery in front of an open fishery. It attempts this by desiring a commercial fishing allocation priority over recreational fishing.

Open fisheries like subsistence and recreational fisheries are constitutionally guaranteed professional and recreational resource access. Closed fisheries like commercial fisheries have no constitutional guarantee to resource access (Owsichek v. Alaska, 1988).

Limited entry fisheries are constitutionally designed to utilize surplus fishery stocks not needed by open public fisheries (McDowell v. Alaska).

The KPRMC has totally ignored this legal requirement and demands a limited entry priority over a recreational common user. This goal by itself shows that the organization has no respect for the Alaska Constitution, Legislature or the Supreme Court. KPRMC's goals seem to center on eagerly stacking every user group it can find directly in front of the resident recreational common user and then banishing nonresidents and even nonlocal residents to a far, far away land.

The KPRMC is not dealing with legal realities. Attempting to resolve long-term allocation disputes by ignoring Alaska law is not a viable method of problem solving. This organization needs to take a step back from self-serving mission statements and rethink its entire approach to the resource allocation issue.

Don Johnson

Soldotna

Earnings from permanent fund

should pay for college education

I am writing on a matter of deep concern to me regarding education. I suggest you make a name for yourselves by dealing with my suggestions.

The permanent fund makes this state the richest in the union, and I can foresee problems with the federal government helping themselves to some of it someday. I have been advised it cannot, but I do not believe that for one minute.

You must all realize that interest of 5 percent on an investment of $26 billion per year realizes $1.3 billion. The use of interest earned each year alone would enable the state to forgive all outstanding student loan funds and initiate a program where all students choosing to go on to college could have all their expenses paid by the state from now and forever.

There must be rules, of course, to ensure the

education they acquire benefits the state. How this might be worked out I leave to the legislators who are far better equipped to deal with that than I.

I sincerely believe this is the greatest gift you can give to the youngsters of this state, and I believe it will be of great benefit to this state in years to come.

Please give my thoughts some consideration and allow me to remind you that personal education is the only thing someone cannot take from you. Thanks for your time; I am a 75-year-old dreamer.

Edward O. King

Soldotna

The Peninsula Clarion welcomes Letters to the Editor. All letters should include the writer's phone number and address. Letters can be faxed to 283-3299 or e-mailed to clarion@alaska.net.



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