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Iditarod Standings

Sam's Line

Posted: Monday, March 05, 2001

Musher Chpt Dogs Time In Time Outt

1. R. Redington Skwentna 14 7:10 p.m. 7:33 p.m.

2. J. King Skwentna 16 5:46 p.m.

3. D. Govoni Skwentna 16 6 p.m.

4. M. Buser Skwentna 16 6:14 p.m.

5. S. King Skwentna 16 7:04 p.m.

6. J. Lanier Skwentna 15 7:28 p.m.

7. Ramy Brooks Yentna 16 2:58 p.m. 3:08 p.m.

8. P. Gebhardt Yentna 16 3:07 p.m. 3:12 p.m.

9. Ra. Redington Yentna 15 3:20 p.m. 3:30 p.m.

10. L. Fiedler Yentna 16 3:45 p.m. 3:51 p.m.

11. R. Bundtzen Yentna 16 4:07 p.m. 4:13 p.m.

12. J. Longo Yentna 16 4:48 p.m. 4:55 p.m.

13. J. Riley Yentna 14 3:14 p.m. 5:01 p.m.

14. T. Osmar Yentna 16 5:01 p.m. 5:07 p.m.

15. A. Church Yentna 16 5:07 p.m. 5:11 p.m.

16. W. Curtis Yentna 16 5:06 p.m. 5:12 p.m.

17. S. Lindner Yentna 16 5:11 p.m. 5:16 p.m.

18. N. Hahn Yentna 16 5:11 p.m. 5:17 p.m.

19. J. Baker Yentna 16 3:14 p.m. 5:26 p.m.

20. B. Chlupach Yentna 14 5:20 p.m. 5:27 p.m.

Other peninsula mushers

23. M. Seavey Yentna 16 3:12 p.m.

24. Danny Seavey Yentna 16 3:14 p.m.

25. J. Little Yentna 16 3:15 p.m.

34. Dan Seavey Yentna 16 3:57 p.m.

52. L. Mackey Yentna 16 5:31 p.m.

Standings are accurate through 8:45 p.m. Sunday

It's exciting, I'll be the first one to admit that now.

When I first learned of the sport of dog sled racing, I have to say I really was not too thrilled at the prospect. My opinion has changed now.

 

Dan Seavey from Seward, Alaska, heads down the starting chute of the restart of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race with Mount Foraker in the background Sunday, March 4, 2001, in Willow, Alaska, as he heads to Nome in the 1,100-mile sled dog race. Seavey is racing against his son, Mitch Seavey, and his grandson, Danny Seavey. This is the first time in the race's history that three generations are racing at the same time. Dan has run the race twice, Mitch four times and Danny is a rookie. (AP Photo/Al Grillo)

AP Photo/Al Grillo

I grew up in a little town called McFarland, Michigan. It is in the Upper Peninsula where our claim to fame happens to be our accents. Up there surrounded by the Great Lakes we have something else, too -- a 200-mile sled dog race called the U.P. 200 (U.P. stands for Upper Peninsula for all of you non-Yoopers).

For a mid-distance race it is not too bad to watch, though I have to say I was never truly thrilled by the idea. Even being interested in the results of the race was not an option for me -- I just never understood all of the buzz in the air about a little sled dog race.

Then I came here -- to Alaska.

I guess my opinion first changed after I spoke to Paul Gebhardt in an interview for the Copper Basin 300. Gebhardt's enthusiasm and general love for the sport really made me think about the pure adrenaline that must be involved.

 

Five-time Iditarod Trail Sled dog Race champion Rick Swenson, right, gives his girlfriend Kelly Williams a farewell kiss as he gets ready to start the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race on Sunday March 4, 2001, in Willow, Alaska. (AP Photo/Al Grillo)

AP Photo/Al Grillo

I couldn't even imagine that sheer talent it takes to be a true competitor in something like the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Not in a million years could I convince myself to try and do it -- my respect for these mushers grew and grew.

My final decision, which came to be a true interest in the sport, came after I spoke to other Kenai Peninsula mushers. Jon Little, Dean Osmar, Jack Berry, Dario Daniels and the 2001 Yukon Quest champion Tim Osmar. With each and every interview I came to realize what an intense and thought-provoking sport mushing actually was -- but now I know.

The thing that really intrigued me was comments about the possibilities of winning. Most just said that a win was the icing on the cake, that the most important reason they were out there was because they loved doing it. How often do you hear that in sports anymore? That is a true athlete. Heck, most even said that even if they were to take first that the money would just go back into their kennels to feed their dogs so they could do it all over again when the next year rolled around. I bet Ray Lewis wouldn't say that he was just going to put his salary into getting his equipment fixed so he could play again.

My best wishes and respect go with the peninsula mushers as they take on the elements and the grueling 1,100 miles that stretches out before them. Good luck and most of all -- have fun!

It's exciting, I'll be the first one to admit that now.

When I first learned of the sport of dog sled racing, I have to say I really was not too thrilled at the prospect. My opinion has changed now.

I grew up in a little town called McFarland, Michigan. It is in the Upper Peninsula where our claim to fame happens to be our accents. Up there surrounded by the Great Lakes we have something else, too -- a 200-mile sled dog race called the U.P. 200 (U.P. stands for Upper Peninsula for all of you non-Yoopers).

For a mid-distance race it is not too bad to watch, though I have to say I was never truly thrilled by the idea. Even being interested in the results of the race was not an option for me -- I just never understood all of the buzz in the air about a little sled dog race.

Then I came here -- to Alaska.

I guess my opinion first changed after I spoke to Paul Gebhardt in an interview for the Copper Basin 300. Gebhardt's enthusiasm and general love for the sport really made me think about the pure adrenaline that must be involved.

I couldn't even imagine that sheer talent it takes to be a true competitor in something like the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Not in a million years could I convince myself to try and do it -- my respect for these mushers grew and grew.

My final decision, which came to be a true interest in the sport, came after I spoke to other Kenai Peninsula mushers. Jon Little, Dean Osmar, Jack Berry, Dario Daniels and the 2001 Yukon Quest champion Tim Osmar. With each and every interview I came to realize what an intense and thought-provoking sport mushing actually was -- but now I know.

The thing that really intrigued me was comments about the possibilities of winning. Most just said that a win was the icing on the cake, that the most important reason they were out there was because they loved doing it. How often do you hear that in sports anymore? That is a true athlete. Heck, most even said that even if they were to take first that the money would just go back into their kennels to feed their dogs so they could do it all over again when the next year rolled around. I bet Ray Lewis wouldn't say that he was just going to put his salary into getting his equipment fixed so he could play again.

My best wishes and respect go with the peninsula mushers as they take on the elements and the grueling 1,100 miles that stretches out before them. Good luck and most of all -- have fun!



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