Current weather

  • Scattered clouds
  • 54°
    Scattered clouds

Natural beauty

Artist captures colorful surroundings on canvas

Posted: Thursday, March 08, 2001

The smell of the oil from paintings wafts through the air when the viewer first enters the Kenai Peninsula College Art Gallery to view the newest showing. But it doesn't take long before the smell is just an afterthought.

His name is Steve Gordon, and his pieces of art speak for themselves.

"Most people looking at his work would agree that it is quite colorful and quite catching of the eye, that is for sure," said KPC art professor and gallery director Gary Freeburg.

"His work goes beyond impressions because of its depth. You might be standing in front of a picture of a snow scene, but it still has a sense of warmth to it."

The Anchorage artist's works are a flurry of colors, all feeding off the natural hues of nature but expressing them in a heightened scene. Freeburg described it looking the way a scene would look just as the sun hits it after a light rainfall.

"He hasn't strayed very far from the real world," Freeburg said of Gordon's color scheme. "He takes the best of a scene and accentuates it a little bit. Most of the images give you a feeling that the sun is hidden but still fills the picture with color."

 

"Untitled"

One of Gordon's pieces, "The Arch, Halibut Cove," is an oil painting on canvas. The shimmering water reflecting the colorful sky is enough to make a viewer gaze a little longer at the work. If viewed with a keen eye, Gordon's work can almost make the viewer feel like they actually are there.

"He takes what people come to Alaska to see and puts them into his pieces," Freeburg said. "It is just sort of what you want Alaska to be. I don't see any mosquitoes or anything else, just a pleasing and enjoyable piece of Alaska."

Gordon's works, which will hang until March 30, vary from season to season but do not stray from the world of nature.

"I have followed his work for a number of years," Freeburg said. "He is a little closer to nature than he used to be, but I just enjoy his style. It is a pleasing expression that I receive from his work."

 

"Birch Shadows"

Freeburg said anyone coming to the show will get their time's worth.

"I don't think that anyone who comes and looks at the show will be

disappointed," he said. "It is quite a show."

Gordon's art has received a big boost from his artistic education.

"He has a tremendous education from one of the top art schools in the country," Freeburg said. "He got his masters of fine arts from the University of Iowa in Iowa city and his bachelors in biology from Dartmouth."

Gordon's work has graced the KPC gallery once before, Freeburg said.

 

"The Arch, Halibut Cove"

"He was shown in out gallery in 1992 or '93," he said. "He as been in Anchorage for a number of years and making a living as a painter. Many artists don't expect to make much profit, but apparently Steve Gordon has been doing pretty well."

Gordon has had the opportunity to show his work in a number of different places, including the Grant Hall Gallery, the Univer-sity of Anchorage Gallery, Site 250 Gallery in Fairbanks and has had around 25 one-man shows at the Artique Gallery in Anchor-age.

He also has worked at passing on his knowledge of painting, having been a teacher from 1986-99. He taught for the Alaska Pacific University's art program and as a University of Alaska Anchorage instructor.

The Kenai Peninsula College Art Gallery is open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

By SAM EGGLESTON

Peninsula Clarion

The smell of the oil from paintings wafts through the air when the viewer first enters the Kenai Peninsula College Art Gallery to view the newest showing. But it doesn't take long before the smell is just an afterthought.

His name is Steve Gordon, and his pieces of art speak for themselves.

"Most people looking at his work would agree that it is quite colorful and quite catching of the eye, that is for sure," said KPC art professor and gallery director Gary Freeburg.

"His work goes beyond impressions because of its depth. You might be standing in front of a picture of a snow scene, but it still has a sense of warmth to it."

The Anchorage artist's works are a flurry of colors, all feeding off the natural hues of nature but expressing them in a heightened scene. Freeburg described it looking the way a scene would look just as the sun hits it after a light rainfall.

"He hasn't strayed very far from the real world," Freeburg said of Gordon's color scheme. "He takes the best of a scene and accentuates it a little bit. Most of the images give you a feeling that the sun is hidden but still fills the picture with color."

One of Gordon's pieces, "The Arch, Halibut Cove," is an oil painting on canvas. The shimmering water reflecting the colorful sky is enough to make a viewer gaze a little longer at the work. If viewed with a keen eye, Gordon's work can almost make the viewer feel like they actually are there.

"He takes what people come to Alaska to see and puts them into his pieces," Freeburg said. "It is just sort of what you want Alaska to be. I don't see any mosquitoes or anything else, just a pleasing and enjoyable piece of Alaska."

Gordon's works, which will hang until March 30, vary from season to season but do not stray from the world of nature.

"I have followed his work for a number of years," Freeburg said. "He is a little closer to nature than he used to be, but I just enjoy his style. It is a pleasing expression that I receive from his work."

Freeburg said anyone coming to the show will get their time's worth.

"I don't think that anyone who comes and looks at the show will be

disappointed," he said. "It is quite a show."

Gordon's art has received a big boost from his artistic education.

"He has a tremendous education from one of the top art schools in the country," Freeburg said. "He got his masters of fine arts from the University of Iowa in Iowa city and his bachelors in biology from Dartmouth."

Gordon's work has graced the KPC gallery once before, Freeburg said.

"He was shown in out gallery in 1992 or '93," he said. "He as been in Anchorage for a number of years and making a living as a painter. Many artists don't expect to make much profit, but apparently Steve Gordon has been doing pretty well."

Gordon has had the opportunity to show his work in a number of different places, including the Grant Hall Gallery, the Univer-sity of Anchorage Gallery, Site 250 Gallery in Fairbanks and has had around 25 one-man shows at the Artique Gallery in Anchor-age.

He also has worked at passing on his knowledge of painting, having been a teacher from 1986-99. He taught for the Alaska Pacific University's art program and as a University of Alaska Anchorage instructor.

The Kenai Peninsula College Art Gallery is open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

By SAM EGGLESTON

Peninsula Clarion

The smell of the oil from paintings wafts through the air when the viewer first enters the Kenai Peninsula College Art Gallery to view the newest showing. But it doesn't take long before the smell is just an afterthought.

His name is Steve Gordon, and his pieces of art speak for themselves.

"Most people looking at his work would agree that it is quite colorful and quite catching of the eye, that is for sure," said KPC art professor and gallery director Gary Freeburg.

"His work goes beyond impressions because of its depth. You might be standing in front of a picture of a snow scene, but it still has a sense of warmth to it."

The Anchorage artist's works are a flurry of colors, all feeding off the natural hues of nature but expressing them in a heightened scene. Freeburg described it looking the way a scene would look just as the sun hits it after a light rainfall.

"He hasn't strayed very far from the real world," Freeburg said of Gordon's color scheme. "He takes the best of a scene and accentuates it a little bit. Most of the images give you a feeling that the sun is hidden but still fills the picture with color."

One of Gordon's pieces, "The Arch, Halibut Cove," is an oil painting on canvas. The shimmering water reflecting the colorful sky is enough to make a viewer gaze a little longer at the work. If viewed with a keen eye, Gordon's work can almost make the viewer feel like they actually are there.

"He takes what people come to Alaska to see and puts them into his pieces," Freeburg said. "It is just sort of what you want Alaska to be. I don't see any mosquitoes or anything else, just a pleasing and enjoyable piece of Alaska."

Gordon's works, which will hang until March 30, vary from season to season but do not stray from the world of nature.

"I have followed his work for a number of years," Freeburg said. "He is a little closer to nature than he used to be, but I just enjoy his style. It is a pleasing expression that I receive from his work."

Freeburg said anyone coming to the show will get their time's worth.

"I don't think that anyone who comes and looks at the show will be

disappointed," he said. "It is quite a show."

Gordon's art has received a big boost from his artistic education.

"He has a tremendous education from one of the top art schools in the country," Freeburg said. "He got his masters of fine arts from the University of Iowa in Iowa city and his bachelors in biology from Dartmouth."

Gordon's work has graced the KPC gallery once before, Freeburg said.

"He was shown in out gallery in 1992 or '93," he said. "He as been in Anchorage for a number of years and making a living as a painter. Many artists don't expect to make much profit, but apparently Steve Gordon has been doing pretty well."

Gordon has had the opportunity to show his work in a number of different places, including the Grant Hall Gallery, the Univer-sity of Anchorage Gallery, Site 250 Gallery in Fairbanks and has had around 25 one-man shows at the Artique Gallery in Anchor-age.

He also has worked at passing on his knowledge of painting, having been a teacher from 1986-99. He taught for the Alaska Pacific University's art program and as a University of Alaska Anchorage instructor.

The Kenai Peninsula College Art Gallery is open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.



CONTACT US

  • 150 Trading Bay Rd, Kenai, AK 99611
  • Switchboard: 907-283-7551
  • Circulation and Delivery: 907-283-3584
  • Newsroom Fax: 907-283-3299
  • Business Fax: 907-283-3299
  • Accounts Receivable: 907-335-1257
  • View the Staff Directory
  • or Send feedback

ADVERTISING

SUBSCRIBER SERVICES

SOCIAL NETWORKING

MORRIS ALASKA NEWS