Applause

Posted: Thursday, March 08, 2001

Many contribute to success of state hockey tournament

The SoHi hockey booster club would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone involved in making the High School State Hockey tournament a huge success.

First we would like to thank First National Bank, our main sponsor. A big thank you to Coca-Cola and Bruce Hardy for supplying all the pop and powerade. Thank you to the Safeway bakery, Kaladi's Coffee, Mike at the Music Box for videotaping, and Mr. Mike Druce from SoHi for the music addition, It was great! Thank you to SoHi's Jeanna Carver and her foods class for making the wonderful food trays for our hospitality room.

We also thank Mr. Howard and Mr. Dusek for their endless hours at the rink, Mrs. Reynolds for her support, and the city of Soldotna for making this tournament possible to be held here.

Also, many thanks to Mr. Al Dettmer for his countless hours running the clock for the entire tournament, his continued support of SoHi hockey and also his delicious peanut brittle. We also appreciate our announcer, Mr. Dick Swarner, for his time and support of peninsula hockey. A huge thank you to both of these men.

Also, we would like to thank all of the sponsors and people for their continued support of SoHi hockey this past season.

Last, but not least, we would like to thank the Kenai booster club for its help, as well as all the past, present and future SoHi hockey parents -- without all of you this would not be possible.

Laura Sena and Tammy Newby

for the SoHi hockey booster club

Business donations help boost spirits of students taking exam

The students and faculty of Kenai Central High School appreciate the donation of snacks and bottled water from IGA Country Foods, Three Bears and Coca-Cola during the High School Graduation Qualifying Exams. The snacks and water lifted the energy levels and the spirits of those taking the exam.

Kenai Central is fortunate to have a community that supports the school and its activities and programs. The support of the community makes a great contribution to student success.

Sam Stewart, principal

Kenai Central High School

High school exit exam fails 'equal

consideration of interest' argument

Recent articles and opinions on the state of Alaska High School Graduation Qualifying Exam (HSGQE) have focused on the need for performance standards, fairness, legal problems, and delay or not to delay. Today, the Legislature is struggling to modify the HSGQE. I submit that these discussions are misdirected and that the HSGQE should be dropped as unethical under the "equal consideration of interest" argument. Before I continue let me say that those who passed the HSGQE legislation are not unethical. They believe that it is the right thing they are doing and therefore are operating under an ethical standard. I am just submitting that they did not consider a key ethical standard in the debate.

The basic principle of equal consideration of interests does not require equal or identical treatment; it requires equal consideration of each student's best interest. Equal consideration for different students may lead to different treatment and different rights.

Our society has historically provided equal consideration of interest in the educational environment. Students with special abilities or disabilities are not treated equally with other students, but their interests are given equal consideration. A student who needs extra help is allocated greater resources to meet that student's educational needs. Students who excel in physical abilities are provided opportunities in sports. Within the classroom, teachers evaluate each student's abilities and knowingly provide learning opportunities to meet the need of each student.

This is also demonstrated in a variety of testing and intervention plans. Course offerings provide a diversity of opportunities. Parents become involved as advocates of their own child's interests and have the opportunity to define an educational path, which meets those interests. Historically, high school diploma requirements speak to required courses and curriculums but allow flexibility in assessment and presentation in the classroom to meet each student's needs.

The HSGQE legislation does not give equal consideration of interest to each student. It treats all students as equal -- a position that is not defendable. Like it or not, we must accept that all students are not equal. They come in different shapes and sizes; they have different intellectual abilities and learning styles; they come with different capacities to experience pleasure or pain.

As the ethical writer Peter Singer notes: "There is no logically compelling reason for assuming that a factual difference in ability between two people justifies any difference in the amount of consideration we give to their needs and interests." Each is a student with a capacity to learn and develop. To require a single series of tests to pass high school does not recognize these differences and interests.

Instead, today we hear from some individuals, including school board members and public officials, that there is an acceptable failure rate. Is the interest of the student who fails being given equal consideration when we publicly accept a failure rate? If the HSGQE passage rate were 95 percent would there be discussions of a delay in testing? I maintain that no discussion would take place. Today, students are dropping out of high school because they fear they cannot pass the HSGQE. Is each student's best interest being given equal consideration when we force students to leave school for fear of a single test?

I submit that we are heading down a path that can only lead to harm. With the HSGQE we changed the philosophical approach to education -- a system which is punitive instead of educational, one which costs society far more than it will benefit, and one which does not give equal consideration to the interest for each human being.

We have an ethical obligation to consider each student's best interests and provide an educational path for that student. To knowingly do differently is unethical.

Kenneth E. Tarbox

Soldotna

Maybe time has come to register

snowmachines, license drivers

Within the city of Kenai there are thousands of acres of open country suitable for riding a snowmachine. There are probably many hundreds of miles of trails.

Within that same area there are 3 miles of groomed ski trails. The city of Kenai makes a valiant effort to keep the ski trails at the golf course groomed. But no sooner do they get them in condition than a snowmachine comes along and gouges the trail.

Perhaps it is time to require that snowmachines be registered and their drivers licensed. A large registration number could be required on the side so that those few riders who choose to disregard the rights and recreation opportunity of others can be identified.

I don't really want this to happen, nor do I believe it needs to happen yet. Perhaps snowmachine groups should set up education programs. Young riders, who seem to be the primary culprits at the golf course, might be a group on which to focus.

Those who ride should be aware that the increasing number of incidents between snowmachiners and others will eventually lead to regulation of your sport. Government regulation only becomes necessary when we don't consider the needs of others and regulate ourselves.

Phil North

Kenai

Many contribute to success

of state hockey tournament

The SoHi hockey booster club would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone involved in making the High School State Hockey tournament a huge success.

First we would like to thank First National Bank, our main sponsor. A big thank you to Coca-Cola and Bruce Hardy for supplying all the pop and powerade. Thank you to the Safeway bakery, Kaladi's Coffee, Mike at the Music Box for videotaping, and Mr. Mike Druce from SoHi for the music addition, It was great! Thank you to SoHi's Jeanna Carver and her foods class for making the wonderful food trays for our hospitality room.

We also thank Mr. Howard and Mr. Dusek for their endless hours at the rink, Mrs. Reynolds for her support, and the city of Soldotna for making this tournament possible to be held here.

Also, many thanks to Mr. Al Dettmer for his countless hours running the clock for the entire tournament, his continued support of SoHi hockey and also his delicious peanut brittle. We also appreciate our announcer, Mr. Dick Swarner, for his time and support of peninsula hockey. A huge thank you to both of these men.

Also, we would like to thank all of the sponsors and people for their continued support of SoHi hockey this past season.

Last, but not least, we would like to thank the Kenai booster club for its help, as well as all the past, present and future SoHi hockey parents -- without all of you this would not be possible.

Laura Sena and Tammy Newby

for the SoHi hockey booster club

Business donations help boost

spirits of students taking exam

The students and faculty of Kenai Central High School appreciate the donation of snacks and bottled water from IGA Country Foods, Three Bears and Coca-Cola during the High School Graduation Qualifying Exams. The snacks and water lifted the energy levels and the spirits of those taking the exam.

Kenai Central is fortunate to have a community that supports the school and its activities and programs. The support of the community makes a great contribution to student success.

Sam Stewart, principal

Kenai Central High School

HEAD: Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

High school exit exam fails 'equal

consideration of interest' argument

Recent articles and opinions on the state of Alaska High School Graduation Qualifying Exam (HSGQE) have focused on the need for performance standards, fairness, legal problems, and delay or not to delay. Today, the Legislature is struggling to modify the HSGQE. I submit that these discussions are misdirected and that the HSGQE should be dropped as unethical under the "equal consideration of interest" argument. Before I continue let me say that those who passed the HSGQE legislation are not unethical. They believe that it is the right thing they are doing and therefore are operating under an ethical standard. I am just submitting that they did not consider a key ethical standard in the debate.

The basic principle of equal consideration of interests does not require equal or identical treatment; it requires equal consideration of each student's best interest. Equal consideration for different students may lead to different treatment and different rights.

Our society has historically provided equal consideration of interest in the educational environment. Students with special abilities or disabilities are not treated equally with other students, but their interests are given equal consideration. A student who needs extra help is allocated greater resources to meet that student's educational needs. Students who excel in physical abilities are provided opportunities in sports. Within the classroom, teachers evaluate each student's abilities and knowingly provide learning opportunities to meet the need of each student.

This is also demonstrated in a variety of testing and intervention plans. Course offerings provide a diversity of opportunities. Parents become involved as advocates of their own child's interests and have the opportunity to define an educational path, which meets those interests. Historically, high school diploma requirements speak to required courses and curriculums but allow flexibility in assessment and presentation in the classroom to meet each student's needs.

The HSGQE legislation does not give equal consideration of interest to each student. It treats all students as equal -- a position that is not defendable. Like it or not, we must accept that all students are not equal. They come in different shapes and sizes; they have different intellectual abilities and learning styles; they come with different capacities to experience pleasure or pain.

As the ethical writer Peter Singer notes: "There is no logically compelling reason for assuming that a factual difference in ability between two people justifies any difference in the amount of consideration we give to their needs and interests." Each is a student with a capacity to learn and develop. To require a single series of tests to pass high school does not recognize these differences and interests.

Instead, today we hear from some individuals, including school board members and public officials, that there is an acceptable failure rate. Is the interest of the student who fails being given equal consideration when we publicly accept a failure rate? If the HSGQE passage rate were 95 percent would there be discussions of a delay in testing? I maintain that no discussion would take place. Today, students are dropping out of high school because they fear they cannot pass the HSGQE. Is each student's best interest being given equal consideration when we force students to leave school for fear of a single test?

I submit that we are heading down a path that can only lead to harm. With the HSGQE we changed the philosophical approach to education -- a system which is punitive instead of educational, one which costs society far more than it will benefit, and one which does not give equal consideration to the interest for each human being.

We have an ethical obligation to consider each student's best interests and provide an educational path for that student. To knowingly do differently is unethical.

Kenneth E. Tarbox

Soldotna

Maybe time has come to register

snowmachines, license drivers

Within the city of Kenai there are thousands of acres of open country suitable for riding a snowmachine. There are probably many hundreds of miles of trails.

Within that same area there are 3 miles of groomed ski trails. The city of Kenai makes a valiant effort to keep the ski trails at the golf course groomed. But no sooner do they get them in condition than a snowmachine comes along and gouges the trail.

Perhaps it is time to require that snowmachines be registered and their drivers licensed. A large registration number could be required on the side so that those few riders who choose to disregard the rights and recreation opportunity of others can be identified.

I don't really want this to happen, nor do I believe it needs to happen yet. Perhaps snowmachine groups should set up education programs. Young riders, who seem to be the primary culprits at the golf course, might be a group on which to focus.

Those who ride should be aware that the increasing number of incidents between snowmachiners and others will eventually lead to regulation of your sport. Government regulation only becomes necessary when we don't consider the needs of others and regulate ourselves.

Phil North

Kenai

Many contribute to success

of state hockey tournament

The SoHi hockey booster club would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone involved in making the High School State Hockey tournament a huge success.

First we would like to thank First National Bank, our main sponsor. A big thank you to Coca-Cola and Bruce Hardy for supplying all the pop and powerade. Thank you to the Safeway bakery, Kaladi's Coffee, Mike at the Music Box for videotaping, and Mr. Mike Druce from SoHi for the music addition, It was great! Thank you to SoHi's Jeanna Carver and her foods class for making the wonderful food trays for our hospitality room.

We also thank Mr. Howard and Mr. Dusek for their endless hours at the rink, Mrs. Reynolds for her support, and the city of Soldotna for making this tournament possible to be held here.

Also, many thanks to Mr. Al Dettmer for his countless hours running the clock for the entire tournament, his continued support of SoHi hockey and also his delicious peanut brittle. We also appreciate our announcer, Mr. Dick Swarner, for his time and support of peninsula hockey. A huge thank you to both of these men.

Also, we would like to thank all of the sponsors and people for their continued support of SoHi hockey this past season.

Last, but not least, we would like to thank the Kenai booster club for its help, as well as all the past, present and future SoHi hockey parents -- without all of you this would not be possible.

Laura Sena and Tammy Newby

for the SoHi hockey booster club

Business donations help boost spirits of students taking exam

The students and faculty of Kenai Central High School appreciate the donation of snacks and bottled water from IGA Country Foods, Three Bears and Coca-Cola during the High School Graduation Qualifying Exams. The snacks and water lifted the energy levels and the spirits of those taking the exam.

Kenai Central is fortunate to have a community that supports the school and its activities and programs. The support of the community makes a great contribution to student success.

Sam Stewart, principal

Kenai Central High School



CONTACT US

  • Switchboard: 907-283-7551
  • Circulation and Delivery: 907-283-3584
  • Newsroom Fax: 907-283-3299
  • Business Fax: 907-283-3299
  • Accounts Receivable: 907-335-1257
  • View the Staff Directory
  • or Send feedback

ADVERTISING

SUBSCRIBER SERVICES

SOCIAL NETWORKING

MORRIS ALASKA NEWS