Current weather

  • Scattered clouds
  • 54°
    Scattered clouds

"The World Famous Alaska Highway: A Guide to the Alcan and other Wilderness Roads of the North"

Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2001

"The World Famous Alaska Highway: A Guide to the Alcan and other Wilderness Roads of the North," by Tricia Brown, is a major contribution to the travel literature already written about the Alaska Highway.

"Planning for months, traveling for weeks, remembering for a lifetime," begins the travel guide that combines common sense how-tos -- "Pack plenty of film and an extra camera battery" -- with other less thought of suggestions -- "Winter travelers need to consider the effect of static electricity on the film that's rewinding."

Brown covers topics from "Alaska speak" to wildlife. She touches briefly on insurance, metric conversion, road manners and even includes general fishing regulations for all the different provinces one drives through in Canada on the way to Fairbanks.

The author takes the reader on both the eastern route through Alberta and the western route through British Columbia to Mile 0 of the Alaska Highway at Dawson Creek. She does not present a mile by mile trip but features the cities and towns along the way.

A lodging and dining list is included for each place, complete with address, phone number, e-mail, if available, and a brief description. She also added campgrounds in the area and directions on how to get there.

Each section begins with a mileage synopsis. At Dawson Creek "Mile 0 of the Alaska Highway; to Fort St. John: 47 miles (76 km); to the Alaska border: 1,190 miles (1915 km); to Fairbanks: 1,488 miles (2395 km)."

A short history of each city is given, with recognition of its perception of itself: "Fort St. John calls itself the Energetic City, with a nod to the industries that power the city's economy: natural gas and oil extraction, hydroelectric power, forestry, agriculture and tourism."

The book is well arranged, presenting the areas as one would arrive at them from the south.

The "Alaska's State Highways" chapter is presented alphabetically. A table at the beginning of that chapter gives the length of the road, a route description that includes the general road condition, and the number of the highway that coincides with numbers on the map that accompanies the chapter.

Plenty of scenic pictures and maps are included in the book.

The author adds "Road Notes" that include driving hints: "The price of gas in Dawson Creek is usually higher than in the smaller towns ... and after Dawson Creek, the pump prices only go up."

Sidebars highlight a person or special place of the area.

Tricia Brown is a former editor of Alaska magazine. She wrote a travel guide to Fairbanks, and the award winning children's book, "Children of the Midnight Sun." She is the editor of Alaska Almanac. After 22 years in Alaska she currently lives in Scappoose, Ore.

"The World Famous Alaska Highway: A Guide to the Alcan and other Wilderness Roads of the North" will not replace the Milepost as the ultimate travel guide to Alaska, but Tricia Brown has written a fine supplement to the old standby.

HEAD:Highway guide makes for smooth sailing

"The World Famous Alaska Highway: A Guide to the Alcan and other Wilderness Roads of the North"

By Tricia Brown

Fulcrum Publishing

By VIRGINIA WALTERS

"The World Famous Alaska Highway: A Guide to the Alcan and other Wilderness Roads of the North," by Tricia Brown, is a major contribution to the travel literature already written about the Alaska Highway.

"Planning for months, traveling for weeks, remembering for a lifetime," begins the travel guide that combines common sense how-tos -- "Pack plenty of film and an extra camera battery" -- with other less thought of suggestions -- "Winter travelers need to consider the effect of static electricity on the film that's rewinding."

Brown covers topics from "Alaska speak" to wildlife. She touches briefly on insurance, metric conversion, road manners and even includes general fishing regulations for all the different provinces one drives through in Canada on the way to Fairbanks.

The author takes the reader on both the eastern route through Alberta and the western route through British Columbia to Mile 0 of the Alaska Highway at Dawson Creek. She does not present a mile by mile trip but features the cities and towns along the way.

A lodging and dining list is included for each place, complete with address, phone number, e-mail, if available, and a brief description. She also added campgrounds in the area and directions on how to get there.

Each section begins with a mileage synopsis. At Dawson Creek "Mile 0 of the Alaska Highway; to Fort St. John: 47 miles (76 km); to the Alaska border: 1,190 miles (1915 km); to Fairbanks: 1,488 miles (2395 km)."

A short history of each city is given, with recognition of its perception of itself: "Fort St. John calls itself the Energetic City, with a nod to the industries that power the city's economy: natural gas and oil extraction, hydroelectric power, forestry, agriculture and tourism."

The book is well arranged, presenting the areas as one would arrive at them from the south.

The "Alaska's State Highways" chapter is presented alphabetically. A table at the beginning of that chapter gives the length of the road, a route description that includes the general road condition, and the number of the highway that coincides with numbers on the map that accompanies the chapter.

Plenty of scenic pictures and maps are included in the book.

The author adds "Road Notes" that include driving hints: "The price of gas in Dawson Creek is usually higher than in the smaller towns ... and after Dawson Creek, the pump prices only go up."

Sidebars highlight a person or special place of the area.

Tricia Brown is a former editor of Alaska magazine. She wrote a travel guide to Fairbanks, and the award winning children's book, "Children of the Midnight Sun." She is the editor of Alaska Almanac. After 22 years in Alaska she currently lives in Scappoose, Ore.

"The World Famous Alaska Highway: A Guide to the Alcan and other Wilderness Roads of the North" will not replace the Milepost as the ultimate travel guide to Alaska, but Tricia Brown has written a fine supplement to the old standby.



CONTACT US

  • 150 Trading Bay Rd, Kenai, AK 99611
  • Switchboard: 907-283-7551
  • Circulation and Delivery: 907-283-3584
  • Newsroom Fax: 907-283-3299
  • Business Fax: 907-283-3299
  • Accounts Receivable: 907-335-1257
  • View the Staff Directory
  • or Send feedback

ADVERTISING

SUBSCRIBER SERVICES

SOCIAL NETWORKING

MORRIS ALASKA NEWS