Where streets meet

Soldotna a tough location to miss

Posted: Monday, April 05, 2004

The city of Soldotna straddles the Kenai River at the junction of the Kenai Spur Highway and the Sterling Highway, called the "Y."

The river city offers fun for the entire family within its city limits but is also at the crossroads to more adventure.

Along the Spur Highway to the northwest is Kenai, Nikiski and Captain Cook State Recre-ation Area. Along the Sterling Highway to Homer is the scenic south peninsula.

Soldotna's two business districts one up the Kenai Spur Highway and the other on the Sterling Highway cater to every need a visitor may have, from custom salmon processing to galleries that specialize in Native art to tire repair.

This town of 3,944, which serves as the seat of the Kenai Peninsula Borough government, has much to offer those who take the time to explore its side roads.

Soldotna has 11 city parks totaling nearly 400 acres, with more than a half-mile of elevated boardwalks along the river and more than 200 campsites.

There is an $11 fee for overnight camping $5 fee for day use at Centennial, Swiftwater and Rotary parks, plus a 5 percent tax.

The town's recreation facilities include the Soldotna Sports Center, the Karen Street skateboard park, ball fields, rodeo grounds, a golf course, recreation trails, a public library, roller rink and an airport that hosts small planes and ultralites.

The highlight of summer events is Soldotna Progress Days, which features a parade, rodeo, community dinner and other family activities. This year's event will take place July 23 through 25.

The Soldotna Historical Society Museum offers a glimpse of the town's original settlement by postwar homesteaders. Displays include restored original cabins, indigenous wildlife, pelts and Native artifacts. You may reach the museum by turning north on Kalifornsky Beach Road from the Sterling Highway and then turn on Centennial Park Road. Summer hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and noon to 4 p.m. on Sundays. The museum is closed Mondays.

The Soldotna Visitor Information Center displays a 97 1/4-pound king salmon, the world's largest sport-caught chinook, landed on the Kenai River in 1985. The center offers free information about the community and viewing wildlife. It is open daily from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. from May 15 to Aug. 31 near the intersection of the Sterling Highway and Kalifornsky Beach Road by the Kenai River bridge.

The Soldotna Chamber of Commerce is open year-round in the visitor center building.

The city of Soldotna straddles the Kenai River at the junction of the Kenai Spur Highway and the Sterling Highway, called the "Y."

The river city offers fun for the entire family within its city limits but is also at the crossroads to more adventure.

Along the Spur Highway to the northwest is Kenai, Nikiski and Captain Cook State Recre-ation Area. Along the Sterling Highway to Homer is the scenic south peninsula.

Soldotna's two business districts one up the Kenai Spur Highway and the other on the Sterling Highway cater to every need a visitor may have, from custom salmon processing to galleries that specialize in Native art to tire repair.

This town of 3,944, which serves as the seat of the Kenai Peninsula Borough government, has much to offer those who take the time to explore its side roads.

Soldotna has 11 city parks totaling nearly 400 acres, with more than a half-mile of elevated boardwalks along the river and more than 200 campsites.

There is an $11 fee for overnight camping $5 fee for day use at Centennial, Swiftwater and Rotary parks, plus a 5 percent tax.

The town's recreation facilities include the Soldotna Sports Center, the Karen Street skateboard park, ball fields, rodeo grounds, a golf course, recreation trails, a public library, roller rink and an airport that hosts small planes and ultralites.

The highlight of summer events is Soldotna Progress Days, which features a parade, rodeo, community dinner and other family activities. This year's event will take place July 23 through 25.

The Soldotna Historical Society Museum offers a glimpse of the town's original settlement by postwar homesteaders. Displays include restored original cabins, indigenous wildlife, pelts and Native artifacts. You may reach the museum by turning north on Kalifornsky Beach Road from the Sterling Highway and then turn on Centennial Park Road. Summer hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and noon to 4 p.m. on Sundays. The museum is closed Mondays.

The Soldotna Visitor Information Center displays a 97 1/4-pound king salmon, the world's largest sport-caught chinook, landed on the Kenai River in 1985. The center offers free information about the community and viewing wildlife. It is open daily from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. from May 15 to Aug. 31 near the intersection of the Sterling Highway and Kalifornsky Beach Road by the Kenai River bridge.

The Soldotna Chamber of Commerce is open year-round in the visitor center building.



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