Help is on the way!

Agencies work together to get program off the ground

Posted: Wednesday, May 04, 2005

 

  This ambulance was donated to the Kenai Peninsula College EMT curriculum by the Nikiski Fire Department this week. KPC EMT coordinator Paul Perry said his students have already been using the ambulance in training exercises, driving around the parking lot at KPC. Perry said the ambulance has left other KPC students somewhat puzzled as it circles the campus continually during exercises. The ambulance will have a mechanical checkup and makeover complete with decals and an insignia designed by the EMT III class. Photo by Layton Ehmke

This ambulance was donated to the Kenai Peninsula College EMT curriculum by the Nikiski Fire Department this week. KPC EMT coordinator Paul Perry said his students have already been using the ambulance in training exercises, driving around the parking lot at KPC. Perry said the ambulance has left other KPC students somewhat puzzled as it circles the campus continually during exercises. The ambulance will have a mechanical checkup and makeover complete with decals and an insignia designed by the EMT III class.

Photo by Layton Ehmke

An associate's degree program in paramedic technology came one step closer to reality last week when the Central Peninsula General Hospital Inc. board of directors agreed to the use of the hospital as a clinical education site for Kenai Peninsula College.

Classes for the EMT-paramedic program are scheduled to begin Aug. 29, according to KPC's paramedic coordinator Paul Perry.

Perry was present at the hospital board meeting when CPGH approved a memorandum of agreement to provide objectives of clinical education for the medic program.

"We'll put students at CPGH in the Emergency Department, the operating room, in labor and delivery and in intensive care," said Perry.

Prerequisites are that students already have Alaska Emergency Medical Technician I certification and have completed one full year of physiology and anatomy training.

EMT classes will be offered at the college this summer.

Perry, who has been a paramedic for 22 years and will be the primary instructor for the course, said he will be using doctors and nurses to augment what he can teach the students.

"Once the students complete three semesters of the course, they will go to the Lower 48 and work with (emergency responder) departments for six to eight weeks before returning to KPC," he said.

The Portland, Ore., Fire Department already has signed on with the Kenai Peninsula program, and departments in Austin, Texas, and Miami have shown interest, according to Perry.

"The goal is to place paramedics on the Kenai Peninsula," he said.

"We hope to place 15 students from the first class locally.

"(Central Emergency Services), Nikiski and Kenai all support the program," Perry said.

"In fact, Nikiski donated a surplus ambulance to the program. We're having it painted with our new logo," he said.

Applications are being taken for the new course of study. People may call 262-0378 for more information.



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