KPC to host art academy, Youth Fine Arts Insitute

Education with art

Posted: Thursday, May 31, 2001

For people big and small, June is the month of arts education on the Kenai Peninsula. Week-long classes for teachers and other interested adults will be in session from Monday to June 8.

Kenai Peninsula College will host the fourth annual Alaska Alliance for Arts Education Summer Academy. The following week at KPC, June 11 to 15, the Youth Fine Arts Institute will be in session for those prekindergarten to sixth grade and two Saturday sessions for grades seven to 12.

This year's adult week is titled "Integrating the Arts with Integrity." The academy is the brainchild of Katherine Swartz, formerly of the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District, Kenai Peninsula College, and currently professor of arts education at James Madison University in Virginia.

See registration information and youth schedule on the InSide digest page.

"What education needs are methods and practices of teaching the arts," is the message and the vision of Swartz. "The institute teaches teachers to meet the Alaska standards by employing the tools used in the arts."

This year, Swartz is the project and institute director, and she is coming home to Kenai for the summer.

Lance Petersen of Kenai Peninsula College and Pier One Theatre in Homer is the executive director of the Arts Alliance.

 

Celia Anderson demonstrates a principal of visual arts to a class of teachers.

Photo by Jerry McDonnell

Three courses will be offered in the morning session and three courses offered in the afternoon sessions. One course will be offered in the evening session, Petersen said. Three graduate college credits will be offered for each course.

Some of the classes will be limited due to lab space. The evening course is in the computer lab and naturally the space can fill, Petersen said.

Gary Freeburg's photography classes for educators can only accommodate a limited number of people due to the capacity of the darkroom.

The classes are presented by master teachers.

"Kathy's vision is to have master teachers pass on their experience," Petersen said.

Some of this year's classes include cultural diversity; "Many Cultures, Many Medias," by Shala Dobson; visual arts, by Celia Anderson; music for educators, by Maria Allison; and literacy and the arts, by Elaine Larson.

The week immediately following the adult academy, the younger generations will be immersed in the arts at KPC. Saturdays -- June 9 and 16 -- one-day open studio workshops will be offered to grades seven to 12 for $30. From June 9 to 15, week-long sessions will be offered for students up to grade six for $125.

"The Youth Fine Arts Institute was started in 1998 as a one-year program but was so popular that it has become a permanent part of youth programming for Soldotna Community Schools," said Rosie Reeder, director of Community Schools and founder of the institute.

"Now the fourth annual, this youth institute is a collaborative effort of Soldotna Community Schools and the Alaska Alliance for the Arts. The number of participants has doubled since it began, and the number of instructors and class offerings has also doubled. Kenai Penin-sula College has hosted the program since its inception. We believe it is the perfect location," she said.

BYLINE1:By JERRY MCDONNELL

BYLINE2:Peninsula Clarion

For people big and small, June is the month of arts education on the Kenai Peninsula. Week-long classes for teachers and other interested adults will be in session from Monday to June 8.

Kenai Peninsula College will host the fourth annual Alaska Alliance for Arts Education Summer Academy. The following week at KPC, June 11 to 15, the Youth Fine Arts Institute will be in session for those prekindergarten to sixth grade and two Saturday sessions for grades seven to 12.

This year's adult week is titled "Integrating the Arts with Integrity." The academy is the brainchild of Katherine Swartz, formerly of the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District, Kenai Peninsula College, and currently professor of arts education at James Madison University in Virginia.

"What education needs are methods and practices of teaching the arts," is the message and the vision of Swartz. "The institute teaches teachers to meet the Alaska standards by employing the tools used in the arts."

This year, Swartz is the project and institute director, and she is coming home to Kenai for the summer.

Lance Petersen of Kenai Peninsula College and Pier One Theatre in Homer is the executive director of the Arts Alliance.

Three courses will be offered in the morning session and three courses offered in the afternoon sessions. One course will be offered in the evening session, Petersen said. Three graduate college credits will be offered for each course.

Some of the classes will be limited due to lab space. The evening course is in the computer lab and naturally the space can fill, Petersen said.

Gary Freeburg's photography classes for educators can only accommodate a limited number of people due to the capacity of the darkroom.

The classes are presented by master teachers.

"Kathy's vision is to have master teachers pass on their experience," Petersen said.

Some of this year's classes include cultural diversity; "Many Cultures, Many Medias," by Shala Dobson; visual arts, by Celia Anderson; music for educators, by Maria Allison; and literacy and the arts, by Elaine Larson.

The week immediately following the adult academy, the younger generations will be immersed in the arts at KPC. Saturdays -- June 9 and 16 -- one-day open studio workshops will be offered to grades seven to 12 for $30. From June 9 to 15, week-long sessions will be offered for students up to grade six for $125.

"The Youth Fine Arts Institute was started in 1998 as a one-year program but was so popular that it has become a permanent part of youth programming for Soldotna Community Schools," said Rosie Reeder, director of Community Schools and founder of the institute.

"Now the fourth annual, this youth institute is a collaborative effort of Soldotna Community Schools and the Alaska Alliance for the Arts. The number of participants has doubled since it began, and the number of instructors and class offerings has also doubled. Kenai Penin-sula College has hosted the program since its inception. We believe it is the perfect location," she said.

HEAD:KPC to host art academy, Youth Fine Arts Institute

HEAD:Educating with art

CREDIT:Photos by Jerry McDonnell

CAPTION:Students in the Youth Fine Arts Institute emulate the composition of a work of art with body sculpture. This year's week-long session begins June 11 at Kenai Peninsula College.

CAPTION:Celia Anderson demonstrates a principal of visual arts to a class of teachers.

BYLINE1:By JERRY MCDONNELL

BYLINE2:Peninsula Clarion

For people big and small, June is the month of arts education on the Kenai Peninsula. Week-long classes for teachers and other interested adults will be in session from Monday to June 8.

Kenai Peninsula College will host the fourth annual Alaska Alliance for Arts Education Summer Academy. The following week at KPC, June 11 to 15, the Youth Fine Arts Institute will be in session for those prekindergarten to sixth grade and two Saturday sessions for grades seven to 12.

This year's adult week is titled "Integrating the Arts with Integrity." The academy is the brainchild of Katherine Swartz, formerly of the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District, Kenai Peninsula College, and currently professor of arts education at James Madison University in Virginia.

"What education needs are methods and practices of teaching the arts," is the message and the vision of Swartz. "The institute teaches teachers to meet the Alaska standards by employing the tools used in the arts."

This year, Swartz is the project and institute director, and she is coming home to Kenai for the summer.

Lance Petersen of Kenai Peninsula College and Pier One Theatre in Homer is the executive director of the Arts Alliance.

Three courses will be offered in the morning session and three courses offered in the afternoon sessions. One course will be offered in the evening session, Petersen said. Three graduate college credits will be offered for each course.

Some of the classes will be limited due to lab space. The evening course is in the computer lab and naturally the space can fill, Petersen said.

Gary Freeburg's photography classes for educators can only accommodate a limited number of people due to the capacity of the darkroom.

The classes are presented by master teachers.

"Kathy's vision is to have master teachers pass on their experience," Petersen said.

Some of this year's classes include cultural diversity; "Many Cultures, Many Medias," by Shala Dobson; visual arts, by Celia Anderson; music for educators, by Maria Allison; and literacy and the arts, by Elaine Larson.

The week immediately following the adult academy, the younger generations will be immersed in the arts at KPC. Saturdays -- June 9 and 16 -- one-day open studio workshops will be offered to grades seven to 12 for $30. From June 9 to 15, week-long sessions will be offered for students up to grade six for $125.

"The Youth Fine Arts Institute was started in 1998 as a one-year program but was so popular that it has become a permanent part of youth programming for Soldotna Community Schools," said Rosie Reeder, director of Community Schools and founder of the institute.

"Now the fourth annual, this youth institute is a collaborative effort of Soldotna Community Schools and the Alaska Alliance for the Arts. The number of participants has doubled since it began, and the number of instructors and class offerings has also doubled. Kenai Penin-sula College has hosted the program since its inception. We believe it is the perfect location," she said.



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