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Letters to the editor

Posted: Friday, June 07, 2002

National missile defense system not only expensive, its bad idea

A traveling road show is rolling through communities between Homer and Fairbanks to alert folks about the potential dangers deployment of missiles, especially nuclear-tipped missiles, will have on Alaska and the rest of the world.

National missile defense is an expensive ($120 billion in taxpayer dollars and counting) and problem-plagued plan to "shield" the United States from nuclear attack. The idea has been blasted by the scientific community for its unrealistic objective, in effect: "hitting a bullet with a bullet."

For Alaska, missile defense means more contamination, more exposure to cancer-causing toxins, and the possibility of fallout. For the world, it means a new nuclear arms race.

Building missile silos in Fort Greely this month represents the United States' unilateral withdrawal from the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, a treaty called "the cornerstone of strategic stability."

To overcome a possible "shield," and to better protect themselves, countries such as China have already announced plans to build more, and more sophisticated, bombs.

To learn more, check out the road show when it comes through town or visit nonukesnorth.net.

Soren Wuerth, Girdwood, Citizens Opposed to Defense Experiments

Catch-and-release fishing perverts angling's purpose -- food for table

I rarely read the Clarion anymore, but happened to view the front page of the June 5 edition of the Clarion Dispatch. The front page article, "The big one that got away on purpose," left my jaw hanging in disbelief.

We are now rewarding people for hooking fish they do not intend to eat or use? Worse, we are training children to carry on this revolting habit? Is it now commendable to torment a beautiful Kasilof king salmon and call it sport?

When I was a child, I, too, enjoyed fishing. The biggest reward, though, was to have pride in my part of putting good food on the table. That is, after all, the most healthful use of our resource.

Why are so many willing to trade this nutritious, uncontaminated food for money to buy hormone-injected meat that is pumped full of antibiotics?

No one would support the idea of trapping a moose for fun. The practice of catch-and-release perverts the value of respect we should be seeking to develop in our children, while depriving them of good eating habits.

Stacy Correia, Kasilof

No easy solution to fish on beach, but surely there's a better way

I realize that the dumping of these halibut carcasses on the beach has no easy solution as the state of Alaska requires fish to be brought in whole so that limits can be verified.

One solution is for the charter operators to spread the carcasses over a wider area so as to minimize their concentration on the beach just south of the commercial boat launch (most of the small boats launch within one mile of the beach access). If their pickups could drive a few more miles down the beach, it would really help the smell and mess as campers, walkers and private small boat owners would not have to endure this increasing problem. This seems a small inconvenience and would help tremendously!

The charter operators are catching a public resource, making money off that resource and dumping it on a public beach in a very inconsiderate manner! It just does not seem right.

Bud Crawford, Kenai

National missile defense system

Letters to the Editor

National missile defense system not only expensive, it's bad idea

A traveling road show is rolling through communities between Homer and Fairbanks to alert folks about the potential dangers deployment of missiles, especially nuclear-tipped missiles, will have on Alaska and the rest of the world.

National missile defense is an expensive ($120 billion in taxpayer dollars and counting) and problem-plagued plan to "shield" the United States from nuclear attack. The idea has been blasted by the scientific community for its unrealistic objective, in effect: "hitting a bullet with a bullet."

For Alaska, missile defense means more contamination, more exposure to cancer-causing toxins, and the possibility of fallout. For the world, it means a new nuclear arms race.

Building missile silos in Fort Greely this month represents the United States' unilateral withdrawal from the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, a treaty called "the cornerstone of strategic stability."

To overcome a possible "shield," and to better protect themselves, countries such as China have already announced plans to build more, and more sophisticated, bombs.

To learn more, check out the road show when it comes through town or visit nonukesnorth.net.

Soren Wuerth, Girdwood Citizens Opposed to Defense Experiments

Catch-and-release fishing perverts angling's purpose -- food for table

I rarely read the Clarion anymore, but happened to view the front page of the June 5 edition of the Clarion Dispatch. The front page article, "The big one that got away on purpose," left my jaw hanging in disbelief.

We are now rewarding people for hooking fish they do not intend to eat or use? Worse, we are training children to carry on this revolting habit? Is it now commendable to torment a beautiful Kasilof king salmon and call it sport?

When I was a child, I, too, enjoyed fishing. The biggest reward, though, was to have pride in my part of putting good food on the table. That is, after all, the most healthful use of our resource.

Why are so many willing to trade this nutritious, uncontaminated food for money to buy hormone-injected meat that is pumped full of antibiotics?

No one would support the idea of trapping a moose for fun. The practice of catch-and-release perverts the value of respect we should be seeking to develop in our children, while depriving them of good eating habits.

Stacy Correia, Kasilof

No easy solution to fish on beach, but surely there's a better way

I realize that the dumping of these halibut carcasses on the beach has no easy solution as the state of Alaska requires fish to be brought in whole so that limits can be verified.

One solution is for the charter operators to spread the carcasses over a wider area so as to minimize their concentration on the beach just south of the commercial boat launch (most of the small boats launch within one mile of the beach access). If their pickups could drive a few more miles down the beach, it would really help the smell and mess as campers, walkers and private small boat owners would not have to endure this increasing problem. This seems a small inconvenience and would help tremendously!

The charter operators are catching a public resource, making money off that resource and dumping it on a public beach in a very inconsiderate manner! It just does not seem right.

Bud Crawford, Kenai



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