Sports Briefs

Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2001

Kenai drivers fare well in Fairbanks

Three drivers from the Kenai Peninsula had a good showing Friday and Saturday at the Alaska Sprint Tour's stop at Mitchell Raceway in Fairbanks.

The Alaska Sprint Tour showcases open-wheeled, winged sprint cars on the state's dirt tracks.

In the 410 division, Kenai's Jackie McGahan second-place finishes in the Gold Rush Dash on both days of competition and posted a win in Heat 2 on Saturday.

Also in the 410 Division, Kenai's Randy Barnes took third place in Heat 1, Heat 2 and the Main Event Friday, then notched a win in Heat 1 Saturday and placed third in Saturday's Main Event. Nikiski's Elton McGahan took third in the Gold Rush Dash Friday and fifth in Heat 2 and the Main Event Saturday.

Alaska Sprint Tour results

Friday at Mitchell Raceway, Fairbanks

360 DIVISION

Gold Rush Dash -- 1. Bill Balog, Fairbanks; 2. Kurt McKinney, Fairbanks; 3. Tracy Anacker, Fairbanks; 4. Bob Violett.

Heat 1 -- 1. Kurt McKinney, Fairbanks; 2. Bill Balog, Fairbanks; 3. Bob Erdman, Wasilla; 4. Dave Hughes, Palmer.

Heat 2 -- 1. Tracy Anacker, Fairbanks; 2. Kurt McKinney, Fairbanks; 3. Bill Balog, Fairbanks; 4. Bob Erdman, Wasilla; 5. Dave Hughes, Palmer.

Main Event -- 1. Tracy Anacker, Fairbanks; 2. Bill Balog, Fairbanks; 3. Kurt McKinney, Fairbanks; 4. Bob Erdman, Wasilla; 5. Dave Hughes, Palmer.

410 DIVISION

Gold Rush Dash -- 1. John McDonald, Anchorage; 2. Jackie McGahan, Kenai; 3. Elton McGahan, Kenai; 4. Larry Frazier, Anchorage.

Heat 1 -- 1. Robert Hansen, Wasilla; 2. John McDonald, Anchorage; 3. Randy Barnes, Kenai; 4. Jackie McGahan, Kenai.

Heat 2 -- 1. John McDonald, Anchorage; 2. Robert Hansen, Wasilla; 3. Randy Barnes, Kenai.

Main Event -- 1. John McDonald, Anchorage; 2. Robert Hansen, Wasilla; 3. Randy Barnes, Kenai; 4. Larry Frazier, Anchorage.

Saturday at Mitchell Raceway, Fairbanks

360 DIVISION

Gold Rush Dash -- 1. Tracy Anacker, Fairbanks; 2. Bill Balog, Fairbanks; 3. Kurt McKinney, Fairbanks; 4. Bob Erdman, Wasilla.

Heat 1 -- 1. Tracy Anacker, Fairbanks; 2. Bill Balog, Fairbanks; 3. Kurt McKinney, Fairbanks; 4. Bob Erdman, Wasilla.

Heat 2 -- 1. Tracy Anacker, Fairbanks; 2. Kurt McKinney, Fairbanks; 3. Bill Balog, Fairbanks; 4. Bob Erdman, Wasilla.

Main Event -- 1. Tracy Anacker, Fairbanks; 2. Kurt McKinney, Fairbanks; 3. Bill Balog, Fairbanks; 4. Bob Erdman, Wasilla.

410 DIVISION

Gold Rush Dash -- 1. Robert Hansen, Wasilla; 2. Jackie McGahan, Kenai; 3. John McDonald, Anchorage; 4. Randy Barnes, Kenai.

Heat 1 -- 1. Randy Barnes, Kenai; 2. John McDonald, Anchorage; 3. Jackie McGahan, Kenai; 4. Robert Hansen, Wasilla.

Heat 2 -- 1. Jackie McGahan, Kenai; 2. John McDonald, Anchorage; 3. Robert Hansen, Wasilla; 4. Randy Barnes, Kenai; 5. Elton McGahan, Kenai.

Main Event -- 1. Robert Hansen, Wasilla; 2. John McDonald, Anchorage; 3. Randy Barnes, Kenai; 4. Larry Frazier, Anchorage; 5. Elton McGahan, Kenai; 6. Jackie McGahan, Kenai.

Foldager sets Run for the River record

Flip Foldager of Seward won the 5-kilometer Run for the River Saturday in Kenai. Foldager's time of 18 minutes, 0 seconds, was 1:20 faster than last year's winning time by Micah Mohler.

Kent Peterson, a cross-country ski coach at Skyview High School, took second overall by being the only other runner to break 20 minutes. Peterson ran 19:59 and took the division for men from ages 25 to 39.

The first woman to cross the finish line was Patti Foldager, who was sixth overall and finished in 20:51.

A total of 36 runners and walkers participated in the event, which is a fund-raiser for the Kenai River Festival. The race and festival are organized by the Kenai Watershed Forum, a nonprofit citizen's group focusing on watershed education, water quality monitoring and providing a forum for discussion of issues affecting the watershed.

The Foldagers each took home a $25 gift certificate to Mykel's Restaurant and Lounge for winning the race, while other prizes were furnished by River City Books, Veronica's Coffee House, Kaladi Brothers Coffee Company and Mackey Lake Company -- Lazer Engraving.

Run for the River

Saturday in Kenai

Boys 12 to 18 -- 1. Josh Reilly, 20 minutes, 43 seconds; 2. Ryan Crumpacker, 20:48.

Girls 12 to 18 -- 1 (tie). Katherine Amen, Elena Bird, 23:20; 2. Holly McCune, 31:48.

Women's 19 to 25 -- 1. Shiloh Reilly, 23:20; 2. Abby Popp, 25:39.

Men's 26 to 39 -- 1. Kent Peterson, 19:59; 2. Jeff Helminiak, 20:12; 3. M. Scott Moon, 23:24.

Women's 26 to 39 -- 1. Carolyn Roush, 23:48; 2. Michelle McGlasson, 27:18; 3. Melanie Noblin, 30:53; 4 (tie). Amy Anderson, Lori Goodman, 54:58.

Men's 40 to 49 -- 1. Flip Foldager, 18:00; 2. Dennis Ghormly, 23:30; 3. Ole Andersson, 23:44; 4. Mike Seynei, 29:55.

Women's 40 to 49 -- 1. Patti Foldager, 20:51; 2. Mary Stenga, 23:20; 3. Amy McVee, 25:20; 4. Maggie Reilly, 26:50; 5. Kim McCune, 31:48; 6. Phyllis Euchsen, 37:21; 7. Pat Leigh, 44:21; 8. Emily Binnian, 105:23.

Men's 50 to 59 -- 1. Charles Timison, 22:56; 2 (tie). Joe Donahue, Glenn Tinker, 24:45; 4. John Hildebrand, 25:24; 5. Alan Leigh, 44:21.

Women's 50 to 59 -- 1. Connie Wheat, 30:15.

Women's 60-plus -- 1. Kathy Bush, 35:44; 2. Betty Dean, 40:21; 3. Pat Reilly, 49:59.

Wheaties searches for everyday champs

To introduce a new cereal, Wheaties Energy Crunch will honor everyday champions from across the country and give five people the opportunity to appear on its packaging.

The search is for those who excel both athletically and in their communities. Through a nationwide grassroots search, Wheaties Energy Crunch will honor one everyday champion from each of the 50 states. The search will culminate in November, when one grand-prize winner and four other finalists will be selected to appear on the Wheaties Energy Crunch box in 2002.

Individuals can nominate themselves or others by submitting an essay of up to 300 words explaining how they or the person they are nominating is an everyday champion. Entries will be judged on how the individual demonstrates a balanced life while achieving compelling athletic accomplishments and outstanding volunteer community service; and the originality of the essay.

People can enter either via the official search contest Web site at www.WheatiesEnergyCrunch.com, or by mailing their essay to Wheaties Energy Crunch Search for Everyday Champions, P.O. Box 2226, New York, NY 10116, by Sept. 14, 2001. Complete details and official entry rules also are available on the Web site.

The winner will receive $5,000 and Wheaties Energy Crunch will donate $25,000 to the winner's charity of choice. The four runners-up will have their image appear on the back of the Wheaties Energy Crunch box. They will also receive a check for $2,500, and $2,500 will be donated to their charity of choice.

Earnhardt widow: Releasing photos would cause pain

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- Dale Earnhardt's widow testified Tuesday that she has tried to stop the public release of her husband's autopsy photos to spare her family ''painful emotional distress.''

''The photographs are humiliating, disgusting and negative,'' Teresa Earnhardt said. ''That could be nothing but harmful and painful to anyone involved with my family, my company, our fans, anyone.''

A hearing into whether the photos can be made public was expected to continue Wednesday. A college newspaper, The Independent Florida Alligator, and a Deland-based Web site are seeking access to the autopsy photos.

Appearing slightly irritated under questioning from opposing lawyers, Earnhardt said she filed a lawsuit blocking the release of the photos to spare her family from ''humiliation and harm.''

Lawyers for The Alligator have suggested that NASCAR influenced Earnhardt's decision since the images could raise questions about safety at NASCAR races.

Earnhardt denied that NASCAR played a role in her decision.

Under questioning, she also said she didn't think the photos would show anything that could prevent driver deaths.

She added that her decision had nothing to do with her interest in protecting her company, Dale Earnhardt Inc., and Earnhardt's image as a revenue source.

''I don't think it has anything to do with sales. I think it has to do with personal feelings and privacy,'' Earnhardt said. ''It would affect our state of minds because we would be personally harmed.''

An attorney for The Alligator argued that the images should be made public to show whether investigators did an adequate job of determining what killed him.

''We don't know if the photographs are consistent with the autopsy report or inconsistent with the autopsy report,'' said attorney Tom Julin. ''It's an important check on the medical examiner's office and an important check on the police department.''

The Alligator and Websitecity.com were rebuffed in their first attempt to gain access to the photos.

Volusia Circuit Judge Joseph Will on Monday upheld the constitutionality of a new law forbidding the release of post-mortem photos unless allowed by a judge. Florida lawmakers passed the legislation following Earnhardt's death in a last-lap crash in the Daytona 500 on Feb. 18.

Will had ordered the photos sealed four days after Earnhardt's death. Teresa Earnhardt sought the order, saying her family's privacy would be violated.

Monday's ruling left the Alligator and Websitecity.com to argue that the law violates the state's public-records statutes.

Websitecity.com owner Michael Uribe said he wants to view the photos to prove the Volusia County medical examiner's office did a poor job of Earnhardt's autopsy. Uribe already has posted autopsy photos of drivers Rodney Orr and Neil Bonnett on his Web site.

Relatives of the dead drivers testified Tuesday that they were devastated by the posting of the photos on the Web site.

''I can't sleep at night,'' said Orr's father, Beacher. ''I lay down and I see him on the table there naked. That's what I see.''

Added Bonnett's daughter, Kristen, ''Every time I see a photo of my father, I'm reminded of the photos of him in a neck brace with intubation tubes in him.''

The new law forbids copying or inspecting autopsy photos and records. Breaking the law would be a third-degree felony with a maximum sentence of five years behind bars and a $5,000 fine.

The doctor who worked on Earnhardt after the crash testified Tuesday that he didn't think the autopsy photos revealed any information that couldn't be found in the autopsy report. Dr. Steve Bohannon was the only person to view the autopsy photos before they were sealed by Will.

''They depict images that are very personal,'' Bohannon said. ''To anyone other than a medical professional, they would be gruesome and inappropriate for public dissemination.''



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