Save struvite crystals for science

Posted: Sunday, June 24, 2001

Several weeks ago I wrote my column on struvite -- substances found in canned salmon that look like pieces of glass. I just learned of a research project being conducted at the Fish Tech Center in Kodiak regarding struvite. Researchers involved with this project have put out a call for struvite samples.

Kermit Reppond, research chemist with the National Marine Fisheries Service in Kodiak, said he would welcome struvite samples from home canned salmon and other seafood.

The samples can come from either cans or jars.

The study has two components: to improve the testing techniques for detecting the presence of struvite and to evaluate ways of reducing its incidence in canned salmon and seafood. In order to conduct this study they need an abundance of struvite samples.

Anyone finding struvite in home-canned salmon or other seafood can drop the samples by the Extension Office or send them directly to Kermit Reppond at FITC, 118 Trident Way, Kodiak, AK 99615.

Wrap the struvite crystals in paper, put them in a plastic zipper-closure bag and mail them in an envelope.

The struvite crystals can range in size from a small grain of sand to about one-half inch. Reppond said if someone finds a large crystal in a jar and wouldn't mind sending the jar and its contents the researchers might be able to detect small crystals that otherwise might be overlooked.

Help me spread the word about this need for struvite samples. This is a chance for home food preservationists to assist with research that could help improve our own products.

Currently according to the USDA's "Complete Guide to Home Canning," "There is no way for the home canner to prevent these crystals from forming."

Alaska home food preservationists could help change this situation.

For more information about freezing, canning, smoking and pickling fish, contact the Cooper-ative Extension Service at 43961 Kalifornsky Beach Road, or call 262-5824 or (800) 478-5824, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 to 5 p.m.

Linda Athons is an agent at the Alaska Cooperative Extension office on Kalifornsky Beach Road in Soldotna. She is a home economist and involved in the 4-H/Youth Development programs.

BYLINE2:The Home File

BYLINE1:Linda Athons

HEAD:Save struvite crystals for science

Several weeks ago I wrote my column on struvite -- substances found in canned salmon that look like pieces of glass. I just learned of a research project being conducted at the Fish Tech Center in Kodiak regarding struvite. Researchers involved with this project have put out a call for struvite samples.

Kermit Reppond, research chemist with the National Marine Fisheries Service in Kodiak, said he would welcome struvite samples from home canned salmon and other seafood.

The samples can come from either cans or jars.

The study has two components: to improve the testing techniques for detecting the presence of struvite and to evaluate ways of reducing its incidence in canned salmon and seafood. In order to conduct this study they need an abundance of struvite samples.

Anyone finding struvite in home-canned salmon or other seafood can drop the samples by the Extension Office or send them directly to Kermit Reppond at FITC, 118 Trident Way, Kodiak, AK 99615.

Wrap the struvite crystals in paper, put them in a plastic zipper-closure bag and mail them in an envelope.

The struvite crystals can range in size from a small grain of sand to about one-half inch. Reppond said if someone finds a large crystal in a jar and wouldn't mind sending the jar and its contents the researchers might be able to detect small crystals that otherwise might be overlooked.

Help me spread the word about this need for struvite samples. This is a chance for home food preservationists to assist with research that could help improve our own products.

Currently according to the USDA's "Complete Guide to Home Canning," "There is no way for the home canner to prevent these crystals from forming."

Alaska home food preservationists could help change this situation.

For more information about freezing, canning, smoking and pickling fish, contact the Cooper-ative Extension Service at 43961 Kalifornsky Beach Road, or call 262-5824 or (800) 478-5824, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 to 5 p.m.

Linda Athons is an agent at the Alaska Cooperative Extension office on Kalifornsky Beach Road in Soldotna. She is a home economist and involved in the 4-H/Youth Development programs.



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