Wave of rave reviews for 11th Kenai River Classic

Posted: Tuesday, July 13, 2004

There were 208 participants who fished in the Classic this year with 52 guide boats. Over the two days of fishing, a total of 227 fish were landed, with 167 being released and 60 fish being kept. Winner of the Ted Stevens Angler Award, which honors the participant who accumulates the most points in total inches caught, was Duane Gibson of Alaska Erosion. Duane reeled in a point total of 185.4 inches, with a 10% bonus for released fish. The Catch and Release Classic champion was Ben Hayes, of Maurice Sporting Goods, who released a 51.5 inch King. The Classic Champion Award, given to the angler who weighs in the largest fish, went to Patricia "Queen of Kings" Richards of Marathon Oil; her trophy tipped the scales at 69 pounds. The Senators Cup, awarded to the VIP guest who comes in with the longest fish, was awarded to U.S. Postmaster General Jack Potter, for his fish of 51 inches.

 

Senator Stevens presents the Classic Champion award to Patricia Richards of Marathon Oil for her 69-pound king.

In addition to awards given to participants and VIP's, Yamaha recognizes the top three guides for the event who register the most points in Kings caught. First place and the new Yamaha motor for the third year in a row went to Chuck Thomas, second place and $1,000 cash went to Bix Bonney, and third place with a $500 cash prize went to Shawn Friendshuh.

 

Men and women enjoyed a relaxing ride on the Kenai River

According to Ricky Gease, KRSA executive director, some $400,000 was infused directly into the local economy through Classic event expenses, which include accommodations, guides, tours and transportation. The remaining monies will fund 2005 KRSA programs and the endowment fund which covers future programs and on-going maintenance costs of river projects. "Over 100 dedicated volunteers make this event possible. On many levels, participants rave about our community and all our warmth, friendliness and hospitality, they site this event as their portal through which they gain experience and understanding of Alaska and its unique circumstances. Our community can be proud of the many people who make this event possible and such a great success," said Gease.

 

Sarah Whitaker receives her first fishing rod from Senator Ted Stevens at the River Classic

There were 208 participants who fished in the Classic this year with 52 guide boats. Over the two days of fishing, a total of 227 fish were landed, with 167 being released and 60 fish being kept. Winner of the Ted Stevens Angler Award, which honors the participant who accumulates the most points in total inches caught, was Duane Gibson of Alaska Erosion. Duane reeled in a point total of 185.4 inches, with a 10% bonus for released fish. The Catch and Release Classic champion was Ben Hayes, of Maurice Sporting Goods, who released a 51.5 inch King. The Classic Champion Award, given to the angler who weighs in the largest fish, went to Patricia "Queen of Kings" Richards of Marathon Oil; her trophy tipped the scales at 69 pounds. The Senators Cup, awarded to the VIP guest who comes in with the longest fish, was awarded to U.S. Postmaster General Jack Potter, for his fish of 51 inches.

 

A few of the 150 Kenai River Classic volunteers.

In addition to awards given to participants and VIP's, Yamaha recognizes the top three guides for the event who register the most points in Kings caught. First place and the new Yamaha motor for the third year in a row went to Chuck Thomas, second place and $1,000 cash went to Bix Bonney, and third place with a $500 cash prize went to Shawn Friendshuh.

According to Ricky Gease, KRSA executive director, some $400,000 was infused directly into the local economy through Classic event expenses, which include accommodations, guides, tours and transportation. The remaining monies will fund 2005 KRSA programs and the endowment fund which covers future programs and on-going maintenance costs of river projects. "Over 100 dedicated volunteers make this event possible. On many levels, participants rave about our community and all our warmth, friendliness and hospitality, they site this event as their portal through which they gain experience and understanding of Alaska and its unique circumstances. Our community can be proud of the many people who make this event possible and such a great success," said Gease.

There were 208 participants who fished in the Classic this year with 52 guide boats. Over the two days of fishing, a total of 227 fish were landed, with 167 being released and 60 fish being kept. Winner of the Ted Stevens Angler Award, which honors the participant who accumulates the most points in total inches caught, was Duane Gibson of Alaska Erosion. Duane reeled in a point total of 185.4 inches, with a 10% bonus for released fish. The Catch and Release Classic champion was Ben Hayes, of Maurice Sporting Goods, who released a 51.5 inch King. The Classic Champion Award, given to the angler who weighs in the largest fish, went to Patricia "Queen of Kings" Richards of Marathon Oil; her trophy tipped the scales at 69 pounds. The Senators Cup, awarded to the VIP guest who comes in with the longest fish, was awarded to U.S. Postmaster General Jack Potter, for his fish of 51 inches.

In addition to awards given to participants and VIP's, Yamaha recognizes the top three guides for the event who register the most points in Kings caught. First place and the new Yamaha motor for the third year in a row went to Chuck Thomas, second place and $1,000 cash went to Bix Bonney, and third place with a $500 cash prize went to Shawn Friendshuh.

According to Ricky Gease, KRSA executive director, some $400,000 was infused directly into the local economy through Classic event expenses, which include accommodations, guides, tours and transportation. The remaining monies will fund 2005 KRSA programs and the endowment fund which covers future programs and on-going maintenance costs of river projects. "Over 100 dedicated volunteers make this event possible. On many levels, participants rave about our community and all our warmth, friendliness and hospitality, they site this event as their portal through which they gain experience and understanding of Alaska and its unique circumstances. Our community can be proud of the many people who make this event possible and such a great success," said Gease.

Classic Fish Master Bill & Nicole Popp weigh-in the catch of the day.

Senator Stevens presents the Classic Champion award to Patricia Richards of Marathon Oil for her 69lb king.

A few of the 150 Kenai River Classic Volunteers.

Men and woman enjoyed a relaxing ride on the Kenai River.There were 208 participants who fished in the Classic this year with 52 guide boats. Over the two days of fishing, a total of 227 fish were landed, with 167 being released and 60 fish being kept. Winner of the Ted Stevens Angler Award, which honors the participant who accumulates the most points in total inches caught, was Duane Gibson of Alaska Erosion. Duane reeled in a point total of 185.4 inches, with a 10% bonus for released fish. The Catch and Release Classic champion was Ben Hayes, of Maurice Sporting Goods, who released a 51.5 inch King. The Classic Champion Award, given to the angler who weighs in the largest fish, went to Patricia "Queen of Kings" Richards of Marathon Oil; her trophy tipped the scales at 69 pounds. The Senators Cup, awarded to the VIP guest who comes in with the longest fish, was awarded to U.S. Postmaster General Jack Potter, for his fish of 51 inches.

In addition to awards given to participants and VIP's, Yamaha recognizes the top three guides for the event who register the most points in Kings caught. First place and the new Yamaha motor for the third year in a row went to Chuck Thomas, second place and $1,000 cash went to Bix Bonney, and third place with a $500 cash prize went to Shawn Friendshuh.

According to Ricky Gease, KRSA executive director, some $400,000 was infused directly into the local economy through Classic event expenses, which include accommodations, guides, tours and transportation. The remaining monies will fund 2005 KRSA programs and the endowment fund which covers future programs and on-going maintenance costs of river projects. "Over 100 dedicated volunteers make this event possible. On many levels, participants rave about our community and all our warmth, friendliness and hospitality, they site this event as their portal through which they gain experience and understanding of Alaska and its unique circumstances. Our community can be proud of the many people who make this event possible and such a great success," said Gease.



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