World pays tribute to victims Special ceremonies bring Americans across the globe to tears

Posted: Friday, September 14, 2001

LONDON -- A military band played the U.S. national anthem at an unprecedented Changing of the Guard ceremony at Buckingham Palace on Thursday, ordered by Queen Elizabeth II in a show of solidarity with the American people.

White House spokesperson Ari Fleischer called the British gesture ''very touching,'' and noted that Britain, too, lost citizens in the attack.

''The United States is not the only nation that mourns,'' Fleischer said. ''And so, it's a further expression of the wonderful solidarity that the world is showing with the United States.''

Across Europe and the world, nations mourned victims of Tuesday's terror attacks in the United States, ordering flags flown at half-staff, declaring national days of mourning and observing periods of silence.

 

A woman and a girl are part of a chain of candles and torches Thursday, Sept. 13, 2001 in the western German town of Duisburg during a memorial ceremony for the victims of Tuesday's terrorist attack in the U.S.

AP Photo/Michael Sohn

Paying tribute to the hundreds of American firefighters who died, firefighters in Hungary tied black ribbons on their vehicles and Polish fire trucks sounded their sirens in the afternoon.

In London, thousands of onlookers -- and hundreds of Americans -- stood eight deep at Buckingham Palace's front gates and lined the road to the queen's main residence. Some carried miniature U.S. flags.

''I want to be closer to home right now and this is the closest we can get,'' said 34-year-old Laura Esposito of Boston, who was wrapping up a vacation in Sweden when the terrorists struck and has been unable to return home.

Prince Andrew, the queen's second son, and U.S. Ambassador William Farish attended the 45-minute ceremony. Queen Elizabeth planned to return from her vacation in Scotland to attend a service Friday at St. Paul's Cathedral for Americans living in London.

 

Palestinian children hold placards and U.S. flags as they gather outside the U.N. headquarters in Gaza City in the Gaza Strip Thursday Sept. 13, 2001. Palestinians expressed their condolences for the victims of the the attacks on the United States on Sept. 11, 2001.

AP Photo/Adel Hana

After the anthem finished, the crowd applauded, then fell quiet to observe two minutes of silence.

''I think Americans should gather together at a time like this,'' said Monroe Haas, 67, of New York City, who had been scheduled to return home from vacation on Wednesday.

Jenny Lee, 31, of San Francisco, saluted and waved a cardboard flag she had made herself and others said they felt less isolated being surrounded by fellow Americans.

''I was really touched that the queen has done this,'' Lee said. ''Even though I'm so many miles from home, I feel that the U.K. is really with us on this one.''

Queen Elizabeth planned to return from her vacation in Scotland to attend a service Friday at St. Paul's Cathedral for Americans living in London.

Much of the world came together Thursday to remember victims of the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

Russian television and radio stations halted their broadcasts, church bells tolled across Austria and German leaders quietly gathered on the steps of the chancellory in Berlin.

''I am here to show that the German people feel for the American people,'' said 37-year-old Berndt Mattig, who joined hundreds in front of the U.S. Embassy in Berlin, amid a sea of flowers spread along the street leading up to the building.

Across Scandinavia, a minute of silence brought buses and trams to a temporary halt. Finnish tram driver Mika Savela, 31, said, ''Innocent people were killed, and we showed our respect for them and their families.'' Norway's King Harald V and Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg gathered in Oslo Cathedral for a memorial service, and flags in Turkey flew at half-staff.

The terror attacks also prompted unusual unity and an outpouring of sympathy from China.

Putting aside months of angry words over Taiwan and a spy plane collision, Chinese President Jiang Zemin offered help with rescue efforts.

In Japan, professional baseball players and 14,000 fans observed a moment of silence before their game at Osaka Dome.

In Iran, several dozen Iranians held a candlelight vigil in a public square in the capital, Tehran, ignoring police orders to disperse.

''We have gathered here to tell the American people that we, too, mourn the death of their innocent beloved ones. We feel as if our own beloved ones have lost their lives,'' said Mitra Sadeqi, 40, who wept as she lit a candle with her daughter.

International insurer Lloyd's of London rang a bell salvaged from British Frigate HMS Lutine in the 19th century that traditionally signals news of a missing ship, but has been rung to mark other tragedies, such as the death of Princess Diana.

Pope John Paul II said he shared in the grief of the American people and that he was praying for them, and Romania's Orthodox Church scheduled memorial prayers in all churches and monasteries on Friday.

French and Polish leaders attended memorial services, while the leaders of Canada, Croatia, Albania, Czech Republic and South Korea declared Friday a day of national mourning. Greenland and Bulgaria also planned to hold a minute's silence on Friday.

CREDIT:AP Photo/Adel Hana

CAPTION:Palestinian children hold placards and U.S. flags as they gather outside the U.N. headquarters in Gaza City in the Gaza Strip Thursday. Palestinians expressed their condolences for the victims of the the attacks on the United States.

BYLINE1:By MARA D. BELLABY

BYLINE2:Associated Press Writer

LONDON -- A military band played the U.S. national anthem at an unprecedented Changing of the Guard ceremony at Buckingham Palace on Thursday, ordered by Queen Elizabeth II in a show of solidarity with the American people.

White House spokesperson Ari Fleischer called the British gesture ''very touching,'' and noted that Britain, too, lost citizens in the attack.

''The United States is not the only nation that mourns,'' Fleischer said. ''And so, it's a further expression of the wonderful solidarity that the world is showing with the United States.''

Across Europe and the world, nations mourned victims of Tuesday's terror attacks in the United States, ordering flags flown at half-staff, declaring national days of mourning and observing periods of silence.

Paying tribute to the hundreds of American firefighters who died, firefighters in Hungary tied black ribbons on their vehicles and Polish fire trucks sounded their sirens in the afternoon.

In London, thousands of onlookers -- and hundreds of Americans -- stood eight deep at Buckingham Palace's front gates and lined the road to the queen's main residence. Some carried miniature U.S. flags.

''I want to be closer to home right now and this is the closest we can get,'' said 34-year-old Laura Esposito of Boston, who was wrapping up a vacation in Sweden when the terrorists struck and has been unable to return home.

Prince Andrew, the queen's second son, and U.S. Ambassador William Farish attended the 45-minute ceremony. Queen Elizabeth planned to return from her vacation in Scotland to attend a service Friday at St. Paul's Cathedral for Americans living in London.

After the anthem finished, the crowd applauded, then fell quiet to observe two minutes of silence.

''I think Americans should gather together at a time like this,'' said Monroe Haas, 67, of New York City, who had been scheduled to return home from vacation on Wednesday.

Jenny Lee, 31, of San Francisco, saluted and waved a cardboard flag she had made herself and others said they felt less isolated being surrounded by fellow Americans.

''I was really touched that the queen has done this,'' Lee said. ''Even though I'm so many miles from home, I feel that the U.K. is really with us on this one.''

Queen Elizabeth planned to return from her vacation in Scotland to attend a service Friday at St. Paul's Cathedral for Americans living in London.

Much of the world came together Thursday to remember victims of the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

Russian television and radio stations halted their broadcasts, church bells tolled across Austria and German leaders quietly gathered on the steps of the chancellory in Berlin.

''I am here to show that the German people feel for the American people,'' said 37-year-old Berndt Mattig, who joined hundreds in front of the U.S. Embassy in Berlin, amid a sea of flowers spread along the street leading up to the building.

Across Scandinavia, a minute of silence brought buses and trams to a temporary halt. Finnish tram driver Mika Savela, 31, said, ''Innocent people were killed, and we showed our respect for them and their families.'' Norway's King Harald V and Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg gathered in Oslo Cathedral for a memorial service, and flags in Turkey flew at half-staff.

The terror attacks also prompted unusual unity and an outpouring of sympathy from China.

Putting aside months of angry words over Taiwan and a spy plane collision, Chinese President Jiang Zemin offered help with rescue efforts.

In Japan, professional baseball players and 14,000 fans observed a moment of silence before their game at Osaka Dome.

In Iran, several dozen Iranians held a candlelight vigil in a public square in the capital, Tehran, ignoring police orders to disperse.

''We have gathered here to tell the American people that we, too, mourn the death of their innocent beloved ones. We feel as if our own beloved ones have lost their lives,'' said Mitra Sadeqi, 40, who wept as she lit a candle with her daughter.

International insurer Lloyd's of London rang a bell salvaged from British Frigate HMS Lutine in the 19th century that traditionally signals news of a missing ship, but has been rung to mark other tragedies, such as the death of Princess Diana.

Pope John Paul II said he shared in the grief of the American people and that he was praying for them, and Romania's Orthodox Church scheduled memorial prayers in all churches and monasteries on Friday.

French and Polish leaders attended memorial services, while the leaders of Canada, Croatia, Albania, Czech Republic and South Korea declared Friday a day of national mourning. Greenland and Bulgaria also planned to hold a minute's silence on Friday.



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