Fried Coke: The unreal thing

Another fair idea hits the hot oil

Posted: Wednesday, October 10, 2007

HUTCHINSON, Kan. Deep-fried Coke is it.

  Joe Premont, co-owner of Granny's Foods, Cibolo, Texas, drizzles Coca-Cola syrup over bits of funnel cake made with batter infused with more Coke syrup to create fried Coca-Cola, a new food item that was served up at the Kansas State Fair this summer. BILL BLANKENSHIP/THE CAPITAL-JOU

 

Joe Premont, co-owner of Granny's Foods, Cibolo, Texas, drizzles Coca-Cola syrup over bits of funnel cake made with batter infused with more Coke syrup to create fried Coca-Cola, a new food item that was served up at the Kansas State Fair this summer.

BILL BLANKENSHIP/THE CAPITAL-JOU

Apparently, decadence in the world of deep-fried delicacies at the Kansas State Fair didn't reach its zenith when the first Twinkies were dropped in a vat of boiling oil at the 2002 fair.

Nor did it happen a year later when Oreos were added to the pantheon of products plunged into piping-hot oil.

What was missing from those calorie-laden, cholesterol-raising treats?

What could be added that could make dieticians and cardiologists shriek even louder in horror?

Caffeine, of course.

Not to worry. That missing ingredient could be found in fried Coca-Cola, which made its Kansas State Fair debut.

It was last October at the State Fair of Texas where Abel Gonzales, a Dallas computer analyst, introduced this innovative way of simultaneously getting a buzz while clogging your arteries.

Gonzales ran two stands at the fair and sold up to 35,000 fried Cokes over 24 days for $4.50 each and won a prize for coming up with "most creative" new fair food, according to Reuters.

Granny's Food, a concessionaire based in the San Antonio suburb of Cibolo, brought the new taste sensation north to the Kansas State Fair.

"We're not sure yet if it is just a fad," said Joe Premont, who operates the stand just south of Bison Arena with his wife, Brenda, and their "head chef" Tony Florez.

To make a fried Coke, they add Coca-Cola syrup to funnel cake batter, which is dripped into boiling oil and cooked until the little peanut-shaped bits are golden brown.

The Coke-laden bits of funnel cake are then dropped into a Coca-Cola cup before more Coke syrup is drizzled over them. The whole thing is then topped off with a dusting of powdered sugar.

So how does it taste?

A Wichita couple, Justine Fernandez and Brian Starr, shared one of the $5 cups of fried Coke. They took a couple of bites and then declared it tasted like funnel cake "dunked in warm, flat soda."

But they kept eating and kept smiling at every mouthful.

"I think it's great," Starr finally declared, with agreement from Fernandez, who suggested they follow their fried Coke with a deep-fried candy bar.



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