Chamber quintet to perform in Soldotna

Posted: Thursday, October 12, 2000

The Performing Arts Society will kick off the start of a new season on Saturday with a concert by the chamber music quintet Arioso at 7:30 p.m. at the Christ Lutheran Church in Soldotna.

The quintet is made up of principal players from the Anchorage Symphony Orchestra: Roxann Berry, flute; Kathryn Hoffer, violin; Sharman Jacques, oboe; Linda Ottum, cello, and Susan Wingrove, piano. The quintet formed in 1983.

Two other concerts are planned, Helena Emery and Loran Olsen on violin and piano will be featured in February and Dr. Scott Deal on electronic percussion in April. In addition to the concerts, some of the performers will offer master classes through the Performing Arts Society. For more information about the classes, contact Maria Allison.

This year is the third season of providing classical and jazz concerts to the Central Peninsula for the society. Ticket prices for the events are $15.

For more information about the concerts, call 262-4084.

CAPTION:Members of the group Arioso will perform at the Christ Lutheran Church in Soldotna Saturday at 7:30 p.m.

CREDIT:AP Photo/Sam Harrel

CAPTION:Sarah Brown, 11, of Fairbanks, a sixth-grader at Pearl Creek Elementary school, is going to New York City for winning an essay contest on how the Harry Potter books have changed her life. She is one of 10 winners of the essay contest sponsored by the Scholastic Inc., the American publisher of the wildly popular series.

HEAD:Fairbanks girl wins contest

HEAD:Sixth-grader's essay earns her trip to meet Harry Potter author

FAIRBANKS (AP) -- Sarah Brown is going on a Harry Potter-inspired adventure.

The sixth-grader at Pearl Creek Elementary school is going to New York City for winning an essay contest on how the Harry Potter books have changed her life.

Sarah has never been to New York City before.

She is one of 10 winners of the essay contest sponsored by the Scholastic Inc., the American publisher of the wildly popular series.

Her younger brother and parents will accompany her on the trip to New York next Thursday to meet J.K. Rowling. Sarah and the other winning essayists will appear with the British author on NBC's ''Today'' show Oct. 20 and eat breakfast with her.

Scholastic released the names of the contest winners Monday, but a representative of the publisher notified the Browns last week. The representative spoke first with Ann Brown, who handed the phone to her daughter.

''She was just dumbfounded,'' Ann said.

Alan Cohen, the marketing director for Scholastic, said Sunday that the publisher received about 10,000 contest entries. Readers were asked to submit 300-word essays describing how the Harry Potter books changed their lives.

Cohen did not know how many entries were from Alaska and Hawaii, which were originally excluded from the contest. An outcry from librarians and others, including the mayor of Ketchikan, led to the inclusion of Alaska and Hawaii and a contest extension.

In his letter to Scholastic, Ketchikan mayor Rob Weinstein concluded his appeal by saying, ''You can be like Harry Potter or Voldemort -- the choice is yours.''

Apparently not wanting to be like Voldemort (one mean wizard), the publisher extended its deadline to Sept. 18.

Fred Brown encouraged his daughter to write an essay after he read about the contest extension.

Sarah is excited about going to New York and wants to see the Statue of Liberty, the Empire State Building and a Broadway show -- either ''Annie Get Your Gun'' or ''Kiss Me Kate.''

She is a little nervous about being on national television and is still thinking about what to say to J.K. Rowling.

Sarah wants to be a fiction writer when she grows up. She said she likes the Harry Potter books because they are so imaginative.

''I think that Hogwarts sounds like a fun place. If it were real, I would really like to go to the school,'' she said.

Ann Brown said her daughter is a serious reader. She came home from school last year talking about the Harry Potter books, and has since read them all.

In the fourth book, Harry and his friends are found in a corridor at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry where Mrs. Norris, a tattletale cat, has been attacked.

''Snape pinned the attack on Harry, Ron and Hermoine,'' Brown wrote. ''The three try to lie to get out of trouble. Even though they really did nothing wrong, by lying they did do something they could get in trouble for. This is a good lesson for telling the truth no matter what.''

''I am wiser on how to deal with, and not deal with, difficult people,'' she wrote.

Asked for tips on dealing with difficult people, Brown said she ignores them.

''Everybody says, 'Ignore them,' but it's really true,'' she said.

'I think that Hogwarts sounds like a fun place. If it were real, I would really like to go to the school.'

--Sarah Brown of Fairbanks

BYLINE1:By ANGELA CHARLTON

BYLINE2:Associated Press Writer

MOSCOW -- Like so many landmarks, Russia's Museum of Architecture is falling apart. Deep cracks slice through its floors, ceilings and windows. Subway trains whizzing below the 17th-century mansion rattle its sinking foundation.

Tavit Sarkisian, the museum's director, finds its dilapidated state ironic but unsurprising. Its archives bulge with records of famous buildings that are on the verge of collapse -- including prime spots in any tourist guide to Russia such as the Bolshoi Theater and the Hermitage Museum.

''And what about the other needy buildings? The thousands of estates throughout Russia that are just in ruins?'' Sarkisian asks.

Russia boasts a staggering 90,000 official architectural landmarks, including churches and palaces from every era in its history, according to the Culture Ministry -- and many are in danger of extinction. New York-based World Monuments Watch named seven Russian sites in this year's list of the world's 100 most endangered landmarks -- more than any other country.

The government's meager budget can offer little help for these monuments. Wealthy sponsors who support culture in richer nations are scarce. And most Russian landmarks lack money-minded managers aggressive and creative enough to resuscitate their crumbling facades.

There are bright spots: a few feisty curators raising funds through concerts and contests; tycoons refurbishing forgotten pre-revolutionary mansions into corporate headquarters; wood-domed churches trashed during the Russian Revolution undergoing stunning face-lifts.

But Russia's economic woes, pervasive corruption and enormous bureaucracy often mean that money that does get donated for cultural projects disappears into officials' pockets, Sarkisian says.

Sergei Mirozhanov, head of the landmark department at Russia's State Construction Committee, admits that the layers of approval for preservation projects can be stifling.

''We are doing what we can,'' he says. ''We have to maintain them but of course it requires huge, huge amounts of money. ... And there's always politics, internal politics.''

Sarkisian calls it ''wrenching'' to look everyday on the Pashkov House across the street, a lavish, columned -- and long-neglected -- mansion above the Kremlin.

Just a few hundred meters (yards) away, the enormous Grand Kremlin Palace recently enjoyed a controversial $300 million renovation. Swiss and Russian prosecutors are investigating whether Swiss firms involved in the construction paid kickbacks to Kremlin officials from the lucrative contracts.

Some landmarks have sought foreign help. UNESCO, which handles United Nations cultural projects, is soliciting funds for 12 sites in Russia, including the Bolshoi and the Hermitage. But most of the money it has raised is yet to be spent, as cultural leaders and bureaucrats debate where help is most needed.

The 1856 building in central Moscow that houses the Bolshoi has electrical wiring that dates from the 1940s. Chunks of engraved panels on its pink facade have fallen off. The government has been promising to renovate it since 1987.

The world-renowned Hermi-tage Museum in St. Petersburg followed a Western example and sought corporate support. IBM funded its Web site and computer-guided tours through the Winter Palace, home to the museum's vast collection.

Yet the biggest project will be shoring up the baroque green-and-white palace itself. Its windows overlooking the Neva River are thick with grime, and its wood floors sink in many spots under the daily crush of visitors.

Some landmarks are starting to raise money from the public. The Kolomenskoye museum, a tranquil enclave of cathedrals and traditional wooden buildings from around Russia, has boosted revenues with re-enactments of old Russian life.

The 1991 collapse of the atheist Soviet regime spawned renovations at hundreds of Russian Orthodox churches and a few mosques and synagogues. But most of those were privately funded, and thousands of other churches languish in disrepair. Most local parishes are small and poor, and renovations largely depend on volunteers and donated building supplies.

Attracting aid for forgotten landmarks far from the tourist destinations of Moscow and St. Petersburg is daunting.

World Monuments Watch cited the water damage threatening the fortress and historic core of Rostov Veliky, a city in western Russia that dates from 862 and once served as the country's spiritual center.

''The medieval town presents a spectacular array of vernacular wooden houses and ecclesiastical domes, ... (but) moisture has eaten away painted surfaces, ornamentation and entire foundations,'' the group says.

HEAD:Russian architectural treasures falling to ruin

BYLINE1:By ANGELA CHARLTON

BYLINE2:Associated Press Writer

MOSCOW -- Like so many landmarks, Russia's Museum of Architecture is falling apart. Deep cracks slice through its floors, ceilings and windows. Subway trains whizzing below the 17th-century mansion rattle its sinking foundation.

Tavit Sarkisian, the museum's director, finds its dilapidated state ironic but unsurprising. Its archives bulge with records of famous buildings that are on the verge of collapse -- including prime spots in any tourist guide to Russia such as the Bolshoi Theater and the Hermitage Museum.

''And what about the other needy buildings? The thousands of estates throughout Russia that are just in ruins?'' Sarkisian asks.

Russia boasts a staggering 90,000 official architectural landmarks, including churches and palaces from every era in its history, according to the Culture Ministry -- and many are in danger of extinction. New York-based World Monuments Watch named seven Russian sites in this year's list of the world's 100 most endangered landmarks -- more than any other country.

The government's meager budget can offer little help for these monuments. Wealthy sponsors who support culture in richer nations are scarce. And most Russian landmarks lack money-minded managers aggressive and creative enough to resuscitate their crumbling facades.

There are bright spots: a few feisty curators raising funds through concerts and contests; tycoons refurbishing forgotten pre-revolutionary mansions into corporate headquarters; wood-domed churches trashed during the Russian Revolution undergoing stunning face-lifts.

But Russia's economic woes, pervasive corruption and enormous bureaucracy often mean that money that does get donated for cultural projects disappears into officials' pockets, Sarkisian says.

Sergei Mirozhanov, head of the landmark department at Russia's State Construction Committee, admits that the layers of approval for preservation projects can be stifling.

''We are doing what we can,'' he says. ''We have to maintain them but of course it requires huge, huge amounts of money. ... And there's always politics, internal politics.''

Sarkisian calls it ''wrenching'' to look everyday on the Pashkov House across the street, a lavish, columned -- and long-neglected -- mansion above the Kremlin.

Just a few hundred meters (yards) away, the enormous Grand Kremlin Palace recently enjoyed a controversial $300 million renovation. Swiss and Russian prosecutors are investigating whether Swiss firms involved in the construction paid kickbacks to Kremlin officials from the lucrative contracts.

Some landmarks have sought foreign help. UNESCO, which handles United Nations cultural projects, is soliciting funds for 12 sites in Russia, including the Bolshoi and the Hermitage. But most of the money it has raised is yet to be spent, as cultural leaders and bureaucrats debate where help is most needed.

The 1856 building in central Moscow that houses the Bolshoi has electrical wiring that dates from the 1940s. Chunks of engraved panels on its pink facade have fallen off. The government has been promising to renovate it since 1987.

The world-renowned Hermi-tage Museum in St. Petersburg followed a Western example and sought corporate support. IBM funded its Web site and computer-guided tours through the Winter Palace, home to the museum's vast collection.

Yet the biggest project will be shoring up the baroque green-and-white palace itself. Its windows overlooking the Neva River are thick with grime, and its wood floors sink in many spots under the daily crush of visitors.

Some landmarks are starting to raise money from the public. The Kolomenskoye museum, a tranquil enclave of cathedrals and traditional wooden buildings from around Russia, has boosted revenues with re-enactments of old Russian life.

The 1991 collapse of the atheist Soviet regime spawned renovations at hundreds of Russian Orthodox churches and a few mosques and synagogues. But most of those were privately funded, and thousands of other churches languish in disrepair. Most local parishes are small and poor, and renovations largely depend on volunteers and donated building supplies.

Attracting aid for forgotten landmarks far from the tourist destinations of Moscow and St. Petersburg is daunting.

World Monuments Watch cited the water damage threatening the fortress and historic core of Rostov Veliky, a city in western Russia that dates from 862 and once served as the country's spiritual center.

''The medieval town presents a spectacular array of vernacular wooden houses and ecclesiastical domes, ... (but) moisture has eaten away painted surfaces, ornamentation and entire foundations,'' the group says.

The 1856 building in central Moscow that houses the Bolshoi has electrical wiring that dates from the 1940s. Chunks of engraved panels on its pink facade have fallen off. The government has been promising to renovate it since 1987.

You easily and accurately could call Connie Goltz's artwork eclectic, but you'd be missing the point if you stopped there. Goltz's wall hangings, on display at the Kenai Fine Arts Center through the end of the month, are more than mere displays of her talent as a quilter or passion as a collector of buttons, jewelry and literally countless odd items.

To appreciate her work, you have to step back and recognize its interactive nature, just as Goltz's cards next to each piece ask.

In addition to evoking images of attics and old sewing boxes, where you'd expect to find many of the components of her wall hangings, Goltz creates a challenge for her viewers in many pieces. They're not just art. They're puzzles.

"How many circles?" reads Goltz's card for her piece "Eyeballs Askew." Concentric circles made of odd bits and pieces arranged on a linear plane appear to number 52, but a closer look reveals that Goltz has woven more concentric circles, seemingly innumerable, into the fabric as well.

"How many buttons can you see?" reads her card for "Tiddly Winks." You can see plenty. You'll get dizzy if you look at them too long.

One young admirer attempted to count every one. Like the reporter who dared him to try it, he gave up after 50.

Goltz hails from Australia, originally, and now lives in Soldotna.

In her biographic profile, she calls her Australian-Alaska background "a strange combination, like my wall hangings."

Goltz insists she never follows a pattern when creating her odd amalgamations. The pieces "grow from a thought or articles that I find. I never know what the final result will be. The challenges and surprises are part of the excitement," states her profile.

Not all of Goltz's work is fun and games. There are serious pieces, too, like "Stepping out with Grandpa John," a burlesque theme piece that combines a folding fan, silk gloves, peacock feathers, and black lace over the white quilted material cut from a mattress. In the center is a black and white photograph of a well-dressed woman and boy. It's a curious mixture of the cheap and the fancy, the fine and the vulgar.

Another serious piece is "Grandma Torpey." Goltz's grandmother lived from 1893 to 1979, according to the card, and the piece is obviously a celebratory, if slightly reminiscent, visual chronicle of her life. There's a color photograph of Grandma Torpey, along with old pictures of her with an aviator, presumably her husband. There are wedding pictures, too. A badge sewn onto the fabric reads "Australian Commonwealth Military Forces." Other items in the piece include a silver spoon and the usual assortment of buttons and beads.

Some pieces, like "Mystical Moments," combine serious themes with the same light-hearted challenges of her other works.

"Mystical Moments" is one of a few diamond-shaped pieces. While its theme is spiritual, it's a playful spirituality Goltz presents. "Estimate the number of squares," her card reads.

The diamond pieces seem to share a subtle seriousness, an intimation of Goltz's intentions, without spelling them out plainly. "Prom Night," for instance, is made of tabs from soda or perhaps beer cans, surrounding

a CD. These objects speak of easy, lighthearted fun with friends, but the red and

black background also speaks of the nascent romance and anxious passion of sentimental girls and their lascivious dates, respectively, on prom night.

One of the most interesting pieces on display is "Iisha's Hunt," clearly inspired by Goltz's former Outback surroundings. It features a large goanna lizard, with patterns of buttons and beads on its back. Goltz's card reads, "A goanna is a large Aussie lizard ... the claws are from an echidna ... an Aussie monotreme. Follow the footprints up to the water hole ... discover the wildlife!"

Besides revealing Goltz's apparent enthusiasm for ellipses, the card invites viewers to a Australian adventure. Looking closely at the picture, you can find foot and hand prints, a turtle, water holes (more concentric circles) and fish.

Two departures from Goltz's often chaotic playfulness are "Woven Dreams" and "Legends of Light," which seem incredibly ordered in contrast to the other works. "Woven Dreams" consists of white, blue, green and pink squares of equal size, with a pearl at each corner of each square. It looks like a monarch's blanket. "Legends of Light" displays lines of gold- and white-colored objects on an orange background, surrounded by a heavy wood frame. It has an exotic Mediterranean look to it and is appropriately located next to a piece called "The Magic Curtain, or the Belly Dancer."

None of Goltz's wall hangings are for sale.

"My aim is to share and show them at schools, the library, offices such as the Blood Bank, doctor's offices, coffee shops and an odd gallery," according to the profile. (And by which, in the latter reference, you can assume Goltz is referring to any gallery, rather than calling the Kenai Fine Arts Center odd.)

She occasionally donates an older piece to a charity, which the charity can sell by auction or raffle. She recently donated "Family Treasures," which incorporates flowers made of cloth and buttons on a blue, red and yellow background, to the Blood Bank, which will hold a raffle to sell the piece. Raffle tickets are $3 each or two for $5. They are available at the Kenai Fine Arts Center.

The center, at 816 Cook Ave., is open Monday through Satur-day from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.



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