Current weather

  • Scattered clouds
  • 54°
    Scattered clouds

Face lift: Giving gourds a good look

Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2007

With Halloween on the way, the Peninsula Clarion thought it might be fun to invite several artists to carve a pumpkin. The results were as varied as the artists themselves.

Back | Next
  JENNY NEYMAN, a freelance writer, shared this narrative regarding the creation of her jack-o'-lantern: "Being blessed with the hand-eye coordination God gave a garter snake, I was somewhat leery when the Clarion asked me to carve a pumpkin for this spread. But then I figured, when else do you get to be in the paper for stabbing something and have it be a good thing? Thus, Blinky von Gingivitis was born. I just hope the other pumpkins don't beat him up for not looking as cool as they do."

 

BRIANNA BOLTON and AMANDA McGAHAN are dancers with Peninsula Artists in Motion, and found it challenging to carve a dancer into a pumpkin. They created a pattern from the dance company's logo, and transferred it onto the gourd. "It was a little difficult, but a lot of fun. We were trying to be artistic," Bolton said. "It was fun to break away and do something in the Halloween spirit."

 

BUNNY SWAN GEASE, an artist, storyteller, singer and songwriter, said she drew her inspiration from the Dena'ina story "How the Raven Stole the Sun." She said she had the basic shape of her design in mind before she started carving; from there, it was a matter of finding a somewhat flat pumpkin to serve as her canvas, and carving in just the right amount of detail to bring the image to life. "It's simply another art form to tackle," Gease said of working with a pumpkin. "Food is art. I like painting and carving on almost anything. There isn't much in my world that's not a palette or an instrument."

 

CHRIS JENNESS, a graphic artist and cartoonist, took inspiration from the comic book world. "It was fun. I went with the whole comic book idea I've been doing a lot of. It was interesting to make that translate onto a pumpkin." Jenness said carving out letters was pretty straightforward, but figuring out how to do the intricate pattern of small circles was tougher. He used a drill and different sized bits to achieve the effect.

 

JENNY NEYMAN, a freelance writer, shared this narrative regarding the creation of her jack-o'-lantern: "Being blessed with the hand-eye coordination God gave a garter snake, I was somewhat leery when the Clarion asked me to carve a pumpkin for this spread. But then I figured, when else do you get to be in the paper for stabbing something and have it be a good thing? Thus, Blinky von Gingivitis was born. I just hope the other pumpkins don't beat him up for not looking as cool as they do."

 

BUNNY SWAN GEASE, an artist, storyteller, singer and songwriter, said she drew her inspiration from the Denaina story "How the Raven Stole the Sun."

She said she had the basic shape of her design in mind before she started carving; from there, it was a matter of finding a somewhat flat pumpkin to serve as her canvas, and carving in just the right amount of detail to bring the image to life.

"It's simply another art form to tackle," Gease said of working with a pumpkin. "Food is art. I like painting and carving on almost anything. There isn't much in my world thats not a palette or an instrument."



CONTACT US

  • 150 Trading Bay Rd, Kenai, AK 99611
  • Switchboard: 907-283-7551
  • Circulation and Delivery: 907-283-3584
  • Newsroom Fax: 907-283-3299
  • Business Fax: 907-283-3299
  • Accounts Receivable: 907-335-1257
  • View the Staff Directory
  • or Send feedback

ADVERTISING

SUBSCRIBER SERVICES

SOCIAL NETWORKING

MORRIS ALASKA NEWS